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Which one should I keep?

Old 07-15-20, 08:44 PM
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gsulit@shaw.ca
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Which one should I keep?

I have a 1989 Miyata 618GT with original Suntour XCM components 3x6 speed with 11/25 cassette and bar end shifters in excellent condition and my size of 51cm. I also have a Trek 520 ( fairly new I do not know exactly what year ) at officially 53.5 cm but the seat tube is 51cm. The Trek 520 is 9 speed bar end shifters as well but has the nicer components, Deore LX derailleurs, Shimano Ultegra triple crank and Dura Ace shifters, and 11/32 cassette. The Trek is slightly heavier than the Miyata and slightly larger but fits me both well. I feel that the Miyata is faster and the size is textbook for me but theTrek is not bad and has better componenents and fits me well as well although not according to textbook. My vintage heart loves the Miyata but the Trek is the right one as far as technology and better components which will lasts longer and easily replaceable. One possibility is to swap the components and keep the Miyata. I guess I can keep both but for arguments sake, which one should I keep if I have to only have one. Thanks so much.


Last edited by gsulit@shaw.ca; 07-19-20 at 09:37 PM.
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Old 07-15-20, 09:06 PM
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Easy answer!

Keep both of those.

Sell the *third* bike in Canada that wasn't even worth mentioning.
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Old 07-15-20, 11:10 PM
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switch components? you'll wind up cutting
and pasting two vintage bikes into two frankenbikes.
3*6 and 3*9 will have different rear spacing.
quill vs threadless, different bar diameters.
keep the one that fits/rides the bestest.
sounds like the trek since it has the newer tech
that you can replace as needed.
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Old 07-22-20, 09:44 PM
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NO NO NO, do not switch components around, keep them stock.

Man, I would hate to have that decision.

You say the Miyata fits you better? Then that's the one to keep, your comfort is more important then newer technology. Besides that older Suntour stuff was bulletproof, more so than than the newer crap they make today. I would keep the Miyata, if the Accushift thing turns out to be a hassle simply go on EBay and buy a long cage Suntour Cyclone Mark II GT, or Mountech II GTL derailleur and swap the two out but keep the Accushift. With the Mountech you do have to keep the derailleur clean and not let dirt get into the pulleys, but it will reward you with the fastest shifting derailleur in the world in it's era for mountain bikes or touring bikes.
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Old 07-22-20, 10:16 PM
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I would look at the type of touring you intend. If you're doing weekend trips, the Miyata would be fine. Longer stints where you might use a front rack, the Trek would be a better choice.
But in the end: Fit and comfort. Which bike is the one you can ride all day?
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Old 07-23-20, 12:51 AM
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Originally Posted by greatscott View Post

You say the Miyata fits you better? Then that's the one to keep, your comfort is more important then newer technology.
I agree, and yea, the Trek seems a bit large for you in that you've had to move your saddle too far forward to deal with the longer effective top tube. If you do keep the Trek, I would suggest you move your saddle back to a more appropriate position and get a shorter stem, though you might be limited as your present stem is not very long.

Last edited by robow; 07-23-20 at 12:55 AM.
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Old 07-26-20, 06:40 AM
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I once made a decision to get a bike that was too small because of the better components and in retrospect that wasn't a good decision.

I remember thinking I could swap the components off it, but there were all sorts of reasons that didn't happen, as mentioned above--minor compatibility issues.
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Old 07-27-20, 06:16 AM
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Originally Posted by greatscott View Post
NO NO NO, do not switch components around, keep them stock.

Man, I would hate to have that decision.

You say the Miyata fits you better? Then that's the one to keep, your comfort is more important then newer technology. Besides that older Suntour stuff was bulletproof, more so than than the newer crap they make today. I would keep the Miyata, if the Accushift thing turns out to be a hassle simply go on EBay and buy a long cage Suntour Cyclone Mark II GT, or Mountech II GTL derailleur and swap the two out but keep the Accushift. With the Mountech you do have to keep the derailleur clean and not let dirt get into the pulleys, but it will reward you with the fastest shifting derailleur in the world in it's era for mountain bikes or touring bikes.
Originally Posted by MarcusT View Post
I would look at the type of touring you intend. If you're doing weekend trips, the Miyata would be fine. Longer stints where you might use a front rack, the Trek would be a better choice.
But in the end: Fit and comfort. Which bike is the one you can ride all day?
Originally Posted by robow View Post
I agree, and yea, the Trek seems a bit large for you in that you've had to move your saddle too far forward to deal with the longer effective top tube. If you do keep the Trek, I would suggest you move your saddle back to a more appropriate position and get a shorter stem, though you might be limited as your present stem is not very long.
Originally Posted by andrewclaus View Post
I once made a decision to get a bike that was too small because of the better components and in retrospect that wasn't a good decision.

I remember thinking I could swap the components off it, but there were all sorts of reasons that didn't happen, as mentioned above--minor compatibility issues.
From the 5 quotes above, I have decided to keep the Miyata. That is what I was leaning towards keeping but your sentiments just validated my decision. Thank you all. I appreciate it.
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Old 08-05-20, 03:35 AM
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The Miyata frame which fits well, with the Trek shifters, derailleurs, brakes and levers, and drive train would be a great bike too.

What else than spreading the rear end to 130 mm would have to be done?

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Old 08-20-20, 02:11 AM
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Originally Posted by imi View Post
The Miyata frame which fits well, with the Trek shifters, derailleurs, brakes and levers, and drive train would be a great bike too.

What else than spreading the rear end to 130 mm would have to be done?
You probably won't even have to have the rear triangle spread. I'd grab the rear wheel from the Trek and shove it in the Miyata. Decide if the amount of hand force you have to exert to get the wheel in will drive you nuts. If it does, spread the frame. If not, don't bother. All of the other parts should transfer just fine, except maybe the bottom bracket, if you want to swap the cranks, which you probably don't need to do.

Me, I'd put whatever parts I liked best on the frame I liked best, and then sell the other bike. But, then, in over thirty years of riding, every bike I've ever owned has been a frankenbike, including the only two I ever bought new. The OEM parts spec is always a compromise. Well, actually, the bikes I build are compromises too, but they're my compromises, not ones made by somebody else with different constraints, priorities, and preferences.

--Shannon
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