Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Odd Request: Visual estimate of frame size etc.

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Odd Request: Visual estimate of frame size etc.

Old 11-06-21, 12:27 AM
  #1  
LeSexyFishorse
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 128
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 77 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 21 Posts
Odd Request: Visual estimate of frame size etc.

Hi,

So looking at buying a bike the only problem being seller is not being responsive about frame size or state of the seatpost/stem sticking. For the price it is currently still worth me taking the risk to bid imho so I would like to leverage the experience of you guys to guesstimate the size of this frame. All I have to go on unfortunately are photos. Those with experience guesstimating size from photos, what do you guys think the size of this frame is? I am looking for a 54 and up, how bad do you think 52 or 53 would be? Before you ask, yes I know its not good to buy something that isnt your size. What about the stem/seatpost, does this level of corrosion likely indicate frozen stem/seatpost?






LeSexyFishorse is offline  
Old 11-06-21, 12:32 AM
  #2  
DMC707 
Senior Member
 
DMC707's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Oklahoma City
Posts: 4,831

Bikes: Too many to list

Mentioned: 35 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1274 Post(s)
Liked 673 Times in 449 Posts
53-54 ish ---- up to 55 at most
DMC707 is offline  
Old 11-06-21, 12:39 AM
  #3  
LeSexyFishorse
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 128
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 77 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 21 Posts
Guy marked it as being 50. However from his post history he marks everything even those clearly much larger at 50. I was thinking around the 54 range would be possible too.
LeSexyFishorse is offline  
Likes For LeSexyFishorse:
Old 11-06-21, 02:18 AM
  #4  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 13,221

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 195 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4386 Post(s)
Liked 2,418 Times in 1,568 Posts
Yeah, 53-54cm.

I'd be concerned about frame damage based on the amount of oxidation visible in the aluminum parts. Check for rust if possible.

The selling price of that bike would need to be really cheap to make it worthwhile to clean up everything and make it worth replacing components that might be too far gone.
canklecat is offline  
Old 11-06-21, 02:35 AM
  #5  
LeSexyFishorse
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 128
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 77 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 21 Posts
Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
Yeah, 53-54cm.

I'd be concerned about frame damage based on the amount of oxidation visible in the aluminum parts. Check for rust if possible.

The selling price of that bike would need to be really cheap to make it worthwhile to clean up everything and make it worth replacing components that might be too far gone.
Its sitting at about 100 USD last I checked. There is frame rust for sure. Do you think its likely that stem or seatpost is stuck based on the corrosion of the parts? Looks like it was left outside for a long time (idk if this contributes to frame/seatpost sticking). Do you have experience with frame rust to this degree? Do you think it can be salvaged? I have no experience with this degree of rust and needing to take the frame to a builder to repair (corrosion I cannot solve without framebuilding knowledge) would be a dealbreaker for me. This is why I am concerned about stuck stems/seatposts because I dont want to deal with having to heat and cool the frame repeatedly if the problem is severe. I suppose im trying to use that as a frame damage marker. If you suggest any other markers to look for that would be appreciated. I understand this is currently terrible condition and am willing to do teardown/rebuild/repaint up to the point where no special "surgeries" need to be done for 100 USD and a nakagawa.
LeSexyFishorse is offline  
Old 11-06-21, 02:36 AM
  #6  
LeSexyFishorse
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 128
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 77 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 21 Posts
Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
"I knew a cyclist who was doored by a DeLorean. Set him back a few years."
This had me laughing btw
LeSexyFishorse is offline  
Likes For LeSexyFishorse:
Old 11-06-21, 02:56 AM
  #7  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 13,221

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 195 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4386 Post(s)
Liked 2,418 Times in 1,568 Posts
LeSexyFishorse , yep, for the right frame it might be worthwhile.

I've generally avoided bikes that needed a lot of cleanup. I would expect the corrosion to cause some sticking -- seat post, stem, bottom bracket.

There are lots of tips for techniques to unstick and clean up bikes like that, both on bike forums and YouTube. Check the channel for RJ The Bike Guy, the prince of low budget DIY but competent overhauls. He talks fast, moves fast... he's the Pulp Fiction "Winston Wolf" of bicycle repair tutorials. Occasionally I flinch watching him and wonder how many thumbnails and toenails he's lost to bike repairs (yeah, sometimes he's barefoot in his videos). But they're really helpful despite the occasional eyebrow-raisers, like using adjustable wrenches for stuff that demands a lot of cranking. But ya gotta do what ya gotta do.
canklecat is offline  
Likes For canklecat:
Old 11-06-21, 04:30 AM
  #8  
oneclick 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 1,818
Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 680 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 699 Times in 426 Posts
Originally Posted by DMC707 View Post
53-54 ish ---- up to 55 at most
I think bigger. I looked at a few pics of what that search engine shows for "vintage nakagawa bicycle 54" and the actual matches had head tubes that looked shorter than this.
oneclick is offline  
Likes For oneclick:
Old 11-06-21, 06:20 AM
  #9  
AngryFrankie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 577

Bikes: Trek 400 Elance, Losa Winner, 1994 Schwinn Paramount, Specialized Tarmac Pro, Miele SLX, Ibis Ripley, Colnago Oval CX, 84 Masi GC, 1986 Schwinn Voyageur, 1988 Schwinn Tempo, 1998 Schwinn Peloton, 1991 Paramount Ser3

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 127 Post(s)
Liked 50 Times in 31 Posts
55cm.
AngryFrankie is offline  
Old 11-06-21, 08:45 AM
  #10  
Hobbiano 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Baton Rouge La
Posts: 1,004
Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 312 Post(s)
Liked 220 Times in 152 Posts
Since all of my bikes are between 52 and 56, and I look at them every day, with 54 being just about perfect, I'd say that's a 55 (center to top of top tube), or, if you prefer, 54 center to center. But if it has a low or high bottom bracket, that could change it a little bit. I'm going by the distance between the top tube & the down tube at the back of the head tube.
Hobbiano is offline  
Likes For Hobbiano:
Old 11-06-21, 09:20 AM
  #11  
Reynolds 
Passista
 
Reynolds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 7,354

Bikes: 1998 Pinarello Asolo, 1992 KHS Montaña pro, 1980 Raleigh DL-1, IGH Hybrid, IGH Utility

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 787 Post(s)
Liked 482 Times in 275 Posts
53-54 C-C I guess.
Reynolds is online now  
Likes For Reynolds:
Old 11-06-21, 09:49 AM
  #12  
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 20,929

Bikes: 1959 Capo Modell Campagnolo; 1960 Capo Sieger (2); 1962 Carlton Franco Suisse; 1970 Peugeot UO-8; 1982 Bianchi Campione d'Italia; 1988 Schwinn Project KOM-10;

Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1137 Post(s)
Liked 674 Times in 474 Posts
Originally Posted by oneclick View Post
I think bigger. I looked at a few pics of what that search engine shows for "vintage nakagawa bicycle 54" and the actual matches had head tubes that looked shorter than this.
Depends on whether we are talking C-T or C-C -- makes almost a 1.5cm difference on a standard road frame.

In a classic road bike, and depending on frame geometry "squareness," 55cm C-T is my exact size (the Bianchi, the Carlton, and all 3 Capos), and the one pictured looks pretty good to me.
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Carlton: 1962 Franco Suisse, S/N K7911
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline  
Likes For John E:
Old 11-06-21, 10:15 AM
  #13  
LeSexyFishorse
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 128
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 77 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 21 Posts
Originally Posted by John E View Post
Depends on whether we are talking C-T or C-C -- makes almost a 1.5cm difference on a standard road frame.

In a classic road bike, and depending on frame geometry "squareness," 55cm C-T is my exact size (the Bianchi, the Carlton, and all 3 Capos), and the one pictured looks pretty good to me.
Originally Posted by Reynolds View Post
53-54 C-C I guess.
Originally Posted by Hobbiano View Post
Since all of my bikes are between 52 and 56, and I look at them every day, with 54 being just about perfect, I'd say that's a 55 (center to top of top tube)....
Thanks for all the estimates guys. I won the bid for 200USD. Will post pics and measurements when it arrives

Originally Posted by oneclick View Post
I think bigger. I looked at a few pics of what that search engine shows for "vintage nakagawa bicycle 54" and the actual matches had head tubes that looked shorter than this.
This is a great idea for visual estimates when I cant get any accurate ones. I will do this in the future.
LeSexyFishorse is offline  
Likes For LeSexyFishorse:
Old 11-06-21, 01:00 PM
  #14  
LesterOfPuppets
cowboy, steel horse, etc
 
LesterOfPuppets's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Valley of the Sun.
Posts: 39,359

Bikes: everywhere

Mentioned: 70 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8954 Post(s)
Liked 3,868 Times in 2,077 Posts
Originally Posted by oneclick View Post
I think bigger. I looked at a few pics of what that search engine shows for "vintage nakagawa bicycle 54" and the actual matches had head tubes that looked shorter than this.
Could be, as the fork does look kinda tall. Would probably push the size up a cm. I'd still guess 54cm...
LesterOfPuppets is online now  
Old 11-06-21, 01:04 PM
  #15  
LesterOfPuppets
cowboy, steel horse, etc
 
LesterOfPuppets's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Valley of the Sun.
Posts: 39,359

Bikes: everywhere

Mentioned: 70 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8954 Post(s)
Liked 3,868 Times in 2,077 Posts
Originally Posted by LesterOfPuppets View Post
Could be, as the fork does look kinda tall. Would probably push the size up a cm. I'd still guess 54cm...
Actually I think Japanese frames are typically Center to top, so maybe 55
LesterOfPuppets is online now  
Old 11-06-21, 01:06 PM
  #16  
repechage
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 17,254
Mentioned: 113 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2340 Post(s)
Liked 1,260 Times in 949 Posts
55 center to top would be my guess. Top tube probably 55 center to center.
A screaming deal at $100. but I assume it is an auction.
Some of these go where if there is a flurry of bids at the last few official minutes, the auction extends until there are no more bids for a specific period of time.

Long ago I bid a silly amount on a bike, the auction kept extending, over $1,000 beyond the time close price.
In retrospect, I was pleased that someone else bought the bike.
Many thanks to the proud bidder that just HAD to win.
repechage is offline  
Old 11-12-21, 04:36 AM
  #17  
LeSexyFishorse
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 128
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 77 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 21 Posts
Originally Posted by Hobbiano View Post
I'd say that's a 55 (center to top of top tube), or, if you prefer, 54 center to center.
Originally Posted by Reynolds View Post
53-54 C-C I guess.
Originally Posted by John E View Post
55cm C-T is my exact size (the Bianchi, the Carlton, and all 3 Capos), and the one pictured looks pretty good to me.
Originally Posted by LesterOfPuppets View Post
Actually I think Japanese frames are typically Center to top, so maybe 55
Originally Posted by repechage View Post
55 center to top would be my guess. Top tube probably 55 center to center.
Quick update photos from the packing and shipping company. Having them properly disassemble for shipping first. Last call for any size guess changes. Man I wish i could ride this thing tom. Even thought I know I will need to work on it before I can ride it, the excitement is UNREAL. This will be my first road bike too! There seems to be some corrosion on the right side chainstay however I feel that it could be a rotten chain protector rather than the actual frame going by the perfectly straight lines of corrosion and level of corrosion elsewhere on the frame. Fingers crossed! Does that suntour sprint look like it can be saved or should I start shopping for an old 105?

LeSexyFishorse is offline  
Old 11-12-21, 05:44 AM
  #18  
ollo_ollo
Senior Member
 
ollo_ollo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Soviet of Oregon or the NW Florida Redoubt
Posts: 5,154

Bikes: Still have a few left!

Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 415 Post(s)
Liked 238 Times in 143 Posts
Evap-o-rust is your friend here, predict you will be pleased with the final result. Provided the stem and seat post aren't too bound up.. Don
ollo_ollo is offline  
Old 11-12-21, 05:46 AM
  #19  
ollo_ollo
Senior Member
 
ollo_ollo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Soviet of Oregon or the NW Florida Redoubt
Posts: 5,154

Bikes: Still have a few left!

Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 415 Post(s)
Liked 238 Times in 143 Posts
Also, my vote is with the 55-56 cm CTT seat tube crowd. Don
ollo_ollo is offline  
Old 01-28-22, 01:53 PM
  #20  
LeSexyFishorse
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 128
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 77 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 21 Posts
Originally Posted by Reynolds View Post
53-54 C-C I guess.
Originally Posted by John E View Post
Depends on whether we are talking C-T or C-C -- makes almost a 1.5cm difference on a standard road frame.

In a classic road bike, and depending on frame geometry "squareness," 55cm C-T is my exact size (the Bianchi, the Carlton, and all 3 Capos), and the one pictured looks pretty good to me.
Originally Posted by LesterOfPuppets View Post
Actually I think Japanese frames are typically Center to top, so maybe 55
Originally Posted by repechage View Post
55 center to top would be my guess. Top tube probably 55 center to center.
A screaming deal at $100. but I assume it is an auction.
Some of these go where if there is a flurry of bids at the last few official minutes, the auction extends until there are no more bids for a specific period of time.

Long ago I bid a silly amount on a bike, the auction kept extending, over $1,000 beyond the time close price.
In retrospect, I was pleased that someone else bought the bike.
Many thanks to the proud bidder that just HAD to win.
Originally Posted by ollo_ollo View Post
Also, my vote is with the 55-56 cm CTT seat tube crowd. Don
She finally arrived and is a 54 C-T! Top tube is a 53 C-C surprisingly. Well I guess since these are custom frames they are made to the spec of the owner. Fork rake is as sharp if not ever so slightly slacker than my Bridgestone Keirin bike so I expect she will be quite agile (esp given the Zunow influence on the builder). She needs a lot of love but the frame seems to be intact and chromed! Will be starting a new thread on C&V for the build with pictures later today or tom. Super excited!
LeSexyFishorse is offline  
Likes For LeSexyFishorse:
Old 01-28-22, 01:58 PM
  #21  
Inusuit
Senior Member
 
Inusuit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: SE Wyoming
Posts: 311

Bikes: 1987 Diamondback Ascent, 1995 Specialized Rockhopper,1989 Specialized Rock Combo, 2013 Specialized Tarmac Elite

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 97 Post(s)
Liked 275 Times in 133 Posts
Well, congratulations on your new bike. Stop keeping us in suspense. Was the seat post stuck or not? I would have bet on stuck, but would like to know.
Inusuit is offline  
Old 01-28-22, 08:47 PM
  #22  
obrentharris 
Senior Member
 
obrentharris's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Point Reyes Station, California
Posts: 3,840

Bikes: Indeed!

Mentioned: 79 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1138 Post(s)
Liked 1,797 Times in 644 Posts
Nakagawa makes fabulous bikes. You have a real jewel in the rough there!
I would love to see photos of the various frame details when you get a chance.
Brent
obrentharris is offline  
Likes For obrentharris:
Old 01-28-22, 09:26 PM
  #23  
wrk101
Thrifty Bill
 
wrk101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Mountains of Western NC
Posts: 23,018

Bikes: 86 Katakura Silk, 87 Prologue X2, 88 Cimarron LE, 1975 Sekai 4000 Professional, 73 Paramount, plus more

Mentioned: 88 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1050 Post(s)
Liked 527 Times in 382 Posts
1. Unless you know otherwise, a weathered bike like that will likely have stuck steam and seat posts. As far as secret methods to get them out, everything works sometimes. I had to cut the stem out of my last one. I was able to eventually get seatpost out without cutting it out.

2. how are they going to pack this bike without removing seat post and stem?

Last edited by wrk101; 01-28-22 at 09:29 PM.
wrk101 is offline  
Likes For wrk101:
Old 01-29-22, 01:00 PM
  #24  
LeSexyFishorse
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 128
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 77 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 21 Posts
Originally Posted by Inusuit View Post
Well, congratulations on your new bike. Stop keeping us in suspense. Was the seat post stuck or not? I would have bet on stuck, but would like to know.

Originally Posted by wrk101 View Post
1. Unless you know otherwise, a weathered bike like that will likely have stuck steam and seat posts. As far as secret methods to get them out, everything works sometimes. I had to cut the stem out of my last one. I was able to eventually get seatpost out without cutting it out.


2. how are they going to pack this bike without removing seat post and stem?
Originally Posted by Inusuit View Post
Well, congratulations on your new bike. Stop keeping us in suspense. Was the seat post stuck or not? I would have bet on stuck, but would like to know.

Originally Posted by wrk101 View Post
1. Unless you know otherwise, a weathered bike like that will likely have stuck steam and seat posts. As far as secret methods to get them out, everything works sometimes. I had to cut the stem out of my last one. I was able to eventually get seatpost out without cutting it out.


2. how are they going to pack this bike without removing seat post and stem?
You guys are both right, I took the risk (pretty much expected) that the seat post or stem was stuck and that they would be a nightmare to get out. for 200 USD (final bid) I figured it was worth the risk since these bikes opening bid of upwards of 1500 USD here (pristine condition of course). When I did the math, the cost to restore seemed worth it to me. Big surprise was that they were not! seatpost, stem, BB, drivetrain etc., while they all looked horribly corroded (Seat post had caked/jellied grease at the end of it) they functioned 100%. I was scratching my head trying to find something wrong with it. My conclusion is that someone years ago loved this machine and took the time and effort to add grease or do this or that where necessary. Even the wheels were perfectly true. The only issue that made it unridable aside from the tires being too old was that the chainrings had expanded and warped from the corrosion and I had to manually break them off. As for the packing, they did not remove stem or seatpost so it got packed super large and cost more than it should have. Still under the mark tho so I am happy. What I did to offset the cost was buy all the other small parts I wanted for my keirin bike and consolidate them since the box had lots of space.

Here are some pictures. Be warned the images you are about to see may be offensive to some.



The frame seems to be chromed, and the blue seems to be some sort of beautiful electric blue that the initial photos didnt do justice. I was thinking of emailing Nakagawa for the pantone so I could have it matched here. The chainstay "rust" that I thought might have been a cover is actually rust on the bare chrome. He didnt put a chainstay cover, it just isnt painted in that section and has exposed chrome. Chainstays also seem to be done using the Pentagla style? I guess this shouldn't be surprising since its a Zunow (taken from De Rosa iirc) that Mr. Nakagawa probably picked up.





Some more photos of the pantographs






There is a Cinelli logo under the rear brake block. Bottom bracket is smooth and unstamped. Nitto handlebars have been internally cabled (looks to be done as a mod).








This is what was left of the chainring. It was coming off in pieces. It felt like something that you would see on a wreck dive. Luckily there was a handy youtube video to show me how to remove the bolts that got messed up using a wrench and allen key.




So as it stands I have removed the components from the frame and the printing shop has taken photos and measurements of the decals and should give me a sample set next week. I went to 2 shops to see who can match the colors as closely as possible. As for the other components front and rear shifting were crisp and braking performance seems solid. I am currently looking up ways to restore them as they are rusty as all hell. They currently sit in a bath of WD40. Will post a follow up since I am limited to 10 photos.
LeSexyFishorse is offline  
Likes For LeSexyFishorse:
Old 01-29-22, 01:04 PM
  #25  
LeSexyFishorse
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 128
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 77 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 21 Posts
1. Wheelset Issues

My problem is I do not have Suntour tool to remove the cassette. So I will try to clean off the corrosion while it remains on the wheel using wd40. Any ideas on manual removal without the tool? How likely will this thing need servicing and what kind? As for the wheelset, they seem to be sealed bearings which is prob why they still run very well. Not as nice as my Superbe Pro track ones but still quite good. Is it worth replacing the bearing cartrige or is that unnecessary? Spokes nipples also horribly corroded, fine or risk of snapping them off? I have never rebuilt a wheel but I guess I could learn . Aside from this I intend to do the WD40 and steel brush dance dance on those hubs to clean them up. Then maybe some sandpaper for polishing.






2. Brakes Issues

Mostly just rust problems here, I intend to strip them down and soak the rusted parts in white vinegar then wash it off with paint thinner or WD40. Maybe use a wire brush if necessary. If the current WD40 bath its in manages to remove the rust I might skip to just sanding and polishing. If you guys know of a better way to restore these please let me know.


3. Drivetrain Issues

Shopping around on 2nd hand marketplace here for old 53/42 chainrings to use. Saw a NOS shimano 105 53T chainring with the same 130BCD. Do you think this would work? I would like to to a 55 chainring if possible. Do you forsee any issues with a 55/42 setup? Any suggestions on some good quality modern chainrings that dont cost the price of the bike?

RD has been tricky to find videos or instruction for. So far I am going of RJ the Bike guys vid on Suntour Seven disassembly. Not the same I know. If anyone knows of instructions pref in video format for Suntour Sprint specifically or a previous RD with a closer build please let me know.






Also, what do you guys do with the little rubber parts here and there? For example the rubber seals on the brakes or the RD guide wheels. Do you replace them or just add some oil and re-use?

So its cleaning and restoring the parts plus deciding on a paint scheme for the next few days until I am satisfied with the decals. Once I have decals I will stage the build by rebuilding with existing components and riding for a few weeks or months to iron out kinks and pay my respects to the original color. Then I plan to teardown the parts, replace what I need to replace and have her re-painted.


Please feel free to provide input if you see anything jump out at you. This is my very first road bike and my very first restore. I am sure there are finer details that I am missing that a more experienced eye can show me.
LeSexyFishorse is offline  
Likes For LeSexyFishorse:

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.