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Copper Triangle Ride (Colorado)

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Copper Triangle Ride (Colorado)

Old 05-27-21, 10:24 AM
  #1  
Robert A
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Copper Triangle Ride (Colorado)

Anyone done this ride before? Is it well organized and worth doing? It's 75 miles, 6,500 feet of climbing (to 11,000 feet)

https://www.bikereg.com/coppertriang...ign=paidsocial
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Old 05-27-21, 12:20 PM
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It's really nice route, but I've always done it self supported, so I can't comment on the organization.
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Old 05-27-21, 12:21 PM
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I've ridden it many moons ago, and it's a route that's very doable outside the organized ride (I'd do it more often but it's always right around my son's bday). It's a great route, and don't let the 6500 ft of climbing fool you --Vail Pass in that direction at the end of the day is no picnic. Stunning scenery, good organizer, and a great route in general. It's definitely worth the trip -- if you can get out here a couple days beforehand to acclimate a little, that would be advisable. Elevation changes everything -- the low point of the ride is almost 2x the elevation of Mt. Baldy. Insider tip: don't overlook Battle Mtn. It's a 2mi climb stuck in the middle of the screaming descent from Tennessee Pass. It kinda stings.

https://www.rollmassif.com/coppertriangle/course/
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Old 05-28-21, 07:54 AM
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I worked at Copper Mtn Resort for 6 years, and have both supported the ride as a volunteer and ridden it. Great fun, great route, great people. Very much worth it.

as mentioned previously, if not used to altitude my suggestion is to get there a couple days in advance. Stay away from coffee and booze for the first day or so. Water, water, and more water. Just when you think you’re going to puke water, drink more water. It helps a ton to acclimate even if you don’t have any problems.

have fun!
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Old 05-31-21, 06:57 PM
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Originally Posted by robbyville View Post
I worked at Copper Mtn Resort for 6 years, and have both supported the ride as a volunteer and ridden it. Great fun, great route, great people. Very much worth it.

as mentioned previously, if not used to altitude my suggestion is to get there a couple days in advance. Stay away from coffee and booze for the first day or so. Water, water, and more water. Just when you think you’re going to puke water, drink more water. It helps a ton to acclimate even if you don’t have any problems.

have fun!

Actually, the science on altitude acclimatization indicates you want to either get to altitude a couple of weeks ahead, or if you can’t do that “helicopter” in at the
last moment. Coming in a few days early is the worst scenario; too late to acclimate, but long enough to get altitude sick.
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Old 05-31-21, 09:19 PM
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I live at sea level, and the soonest I can arrive is the Wednesday before the Saturday right (so three nights of getting used to the elevation). Should I not bother going?
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Old 05-31-21, 09:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Robert A View Post
I live at sea level, and the soonest I can arrive is the Wednesday before the Saturday right (so three nights of getting used to the elevation). Should I not bother going?
You should go; it’s a fun ride, but you’d be better off arriving Friday rather than Wednesday.
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Old 05-31-21, 10:00 PM
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Originally Posted by asgelle View Post
You should go; it’s a fun ride, but you’d be better off arriving Friday rather than Wednesday.
Why is that so?
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Old 05-31-21, 10:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Robert A View Post
Why is that so?
Post #5
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Old 05-31-21, 10:16 PM
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Originally Posted by tomato coupe View Post
Post #5
Post #5 just makes a statement, but doesn't shed any light on it. I've always been weaker the first 24 hours after arriving in altitude, and gradually get stronger as a few days go by. Why am I more likely to get sick as I acclimate?
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Old 05-31-21, 10:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Robert A View Post
Post #5 just makes a statement, but doesn't shed any light on it. I've always been weaker the first 24 hours after arriving in altitude, and gradually get stronger as a few days go by. Why am I more likely to get sick as I acclimate?
Sounds like you've got a plan. Enjoy the ride.
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Old 06-01-21, 07:20 AM
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Originally Posted by merlinextraligh View Post
Coming in a few days early is the worst scenario; too late to acclimate, but long enough to get altitude sick.
Coming in the night before is the worst scenario. Your body dumps a bunch of blood volume overnight, reducing the ability to pump blood.

I usually feel fine and able to ride hard after two nights at altitude, but that’s just me.

Last edited by terrymorse; 06-01-21 at 07:23 AM.
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Old 06-01-21, 10:57 AM
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Originally Posted by terrymorse View Post
Coming in the night before is the worst scenario. Your body dumps a bunch of blood volume overnight, reducing the ability to pump blood.
What does that mean?
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Old 06-01-21, 11:11 AM
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Originally Posted by terrymorse View Post
Coming in the night before is the worst scenario. Your body dumps a bunch of blood volume overnight, reducing the ability to pump blood.
Originally Posted by tomato coupe View Post
What does that mean?
It means you have less blood after the first night at altitude. Less blood means the heart has to pump faster to supply the same amount of oxygen to your muscles.
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Old 06-01-21, 11:15 AM
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Originally Posted by terrymorse View Post
It means you have less blood after the first night at altitude. Less blood means the heart has to pump faster to supply the same amount of oxygen to your muscles.
Where does it go?
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Old 06-01-21, 11:18 AM
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Originally Posted by terrymorse View Post
It means you have less blood after the first night at altitude. Less blood means the heart has to pump faster to supply the same amount of oxygen to your muscles.
Originally Posted by tomato coupe View Post
Where does it go?
It goes into the toilet. Expect to get up and pee several times during the first night.
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Old 06-01-21, 11:25 AM
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Originally Posted by terrymorse View Post
It goes into the toilet. Expect to get up and pee several times during the first night.
More questions:
-- Why does your body pee blood as a reaction to high altitude?
-- It's really easy to see a tiny amount of blood in urine. Would someone expect to see a lot of blood in their urine the first night?
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Old 06-01-21, 11:35 AM
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Originally Posted by tomato coupe View Post
What does that mean?
It means the poster doesn't know what he's talking about or can't express it properly. Blood volume may drop due to dehydration, but that just means the concentration of red blood cells in the remaining volume goes up. The heart has to pump less volume to get the same O2 carrying capacity.
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Old 06-01-21, 01:13 PM
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Originally Posted by asgelle View Post
It means the poster doesn't know what he's talking about or can't express it properly. Blood volume may drop due to dehydration, but that just means the concentration of red blood cells in the remaining volume goes up. The heart has to pump less volume to get the same O2 carrying capacity.
Imagine if you could make a drug that did that. I bet it would be very popular with cyclists.
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Old 06-01-21, 01:17 PM
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Originally Posted by tomato coupe View Post
More questions:
-- Why does your body pee blood as a reaction to high altitude?
It’s not blood that you pee out, but the fluid (mostly water) in your bloodstream.
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Old 06-01-21, 03:35 PM
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Originally Posted by terrymorse View Post
It’s not blood that you pee out, but the fluid (mostly water) in your bloodstream.
So, as Asgelle stated, you're really just talking about dehydration. I think there is any easy fix for that.
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Old 06-01-21, 03:47 PM
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Originally Posted by tomato coupe View Post
So, as Asgelle stated, you're really just talking about dehydration. I think there is any easy fix for that.
No, there is not an easy fix for reduced blood volume at altitude. If you drink more, you body will simply get rid of it.

The body concentrates the red blood cells in the bloodstream to maintain oxygen levels. It does that by dumping plasma through the kidneys.

General introduction to altitude adaptation and mountain sickness

The key elements in acclimatization aim at securing the oxygen supply to tissues and organs of the body with an optimal oxygen tension of the arterial blood. In acute exposure, ventilation and heart rate are elevated with a minimum reduction in stroke volume. In addition, plasma volume is reduced over 24-48 h to improve the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood, and is further improved during a prolonged sojourn at altitude through an enhanced erythropoiesis and larger Hb (hemoglobin) mass, allowing for a partial or full restoration of the blood volume and arterial oxygen content.
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Old 06-01-21, 04:04 PM
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Originally Posted by asgelle View Post
Blood volume may drop due to dehydration, but that just means the concentration of red blood cells in the remaining volume goes up. The heart has to pump less volume to get the same O2 carrying capacity.
Blood volume does drop at altitude, it's the fastest and most noticeable adaptation.

It does concentrate the red blood cells, but it impairs aerobic performance.

DEHYDRATION AND ITS EFFECTS ON PERFORMANCE

Even in cool laboratory conditions, maximal aerobic power ( .VO2max) decreases by about 5% when persons experience fluid losses equivalent to 3% of body mass or more.

Dehydration causes a fall in plasma volume both at rest and during exercise, and a decreased blood volume increases blood thickness (viscosity), lowers central venous pressure, and reduces venous return of blood to the heart.The main reasons dehydration has an adverse effect on exercise performance can be summarized as follows:

• Reduction in blood volume
• Decreased skin blood flow
• Decreased sweat rate
• Decreased heat dissipation
• Increased core temperature
• Increased rate of muscle glycogen use

-- Jeukendrup & Gleeson, Sport Nutrition-2nd Edition
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Old 06-01-21, 04:06 PM
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Originally Posted by terrymorse View Post
Blood volume does drop at altitude, it's the fastest and most noticeable adaptation.

It does concentrate the red blood cells, but it impairs aerobic performance.
In other words the opposite of what you originally wrote.
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Old 06-01-21, 04:10 PM
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Originally Posted by terrymorse View Post
No, there is not an easy fix for reduced blood volume at altitude. If you drink more, you body will simply get rid of it.

The body concentrates the red blood cells in the bloodstream to maintain oxygen levels. It does that by dumping plasma through the kidneys.
Is the reduction of blood volume a good thing or a bad thing?
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