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Bike tool kit?

Old 06-30-22, 10:25 AM
  #1  
mlau
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Bike tool kit?

Dear Mechanics,

I usually hang out in the folding bike section. Recently, I was tuning up my Xootr Swift (repacking the hubs, changing the chain) and was really satisfied by how nicely it rides afterwards.
I have my tools scattered between a small Harbor Freight toolbox, a random box, another random tool box, and a wrench set.

Can you recommend components(tools)/consumables (lube/grease) for a solid bike tool kit for a wannabee home mechanic?

I'm thinking of organizing things in a fancy Tanos box with foam inserts.
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Old 06-30-22, 10:29 AM
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Following up:

I have the following:
- Bondhaus hex wrenches
- Gearwrench metric wrenches
- Park tools pedal wrench, chain whip, Cassette lockring tool, adjustable torque driver, grease, master link pliers, chain breaker, chain wear indicator
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Old 06-30-22, 11:08 AM
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I'll preface this by saying you may already have a lot of these tools in your home tool box (and I see that you do from the post above). Anyway...

--Set of metric open/box end wrenches up to 17mm;
--12" adjustable ("Crescent") wrench;
--Ball-peen hammer;
--Metal shop ruler (to measure chain stretch, etc.);
--Needle-nose pliers (to grab the cable when adjusting derailleur cable tension);
--JIS (Japanese) Phillips head screwdriver, probably No. 2 will cover you in most instances;
--Hex/Allen Tri-wrench in 4, 5, 6 mm;
--Socket Tri-wrench in 8, 9, 10 mm;
--Torx Tri-wrench (I have one but don't use it, because I don't have any Torx fasteners);
--Pedal Wrench (I have an older (Verma?) model that has both 15mm and 1/2" at either end);
--Set of good quality cone wrenches (I use Park);
--High-quality spoke wrench to fit your spoke nipples. Park makes these. Get the kind that looks like a hot-air-balloon with rubber grip. Don't cheap out on this tool!;
--Headset wrench specific to your headset if you use one. Park makes these as well;
--Chain Whip;
--Cassette lockring tool depending on cassette manufacturer (This will be used in conjunction with your chain whip and adjustable wrench);
--Bottom-bracket tools, depending on what you're using and the era;
--Fourth hand (Hozan makes an excellent one);
--Quality bike-cable-specific cable cutters (I use a discontinued Shimano version but the newer Park one seems quite capable);
--Metric Allen key set (the "L" shaped ones);
--Chain Tool (type depending on what you use--rivets, quick links, etc.);
--Tools specific to your bike--I need an extra long 6mm Allen key for my stem and a 8mm Allen for my cranks. I also have a specific tool for my chainring bolts and crank dust caps, and one to adjust my pedal bearings;
--Good quality oil (your choice; I use Tri-Flow);
--Good quality grease (your choice; I use Shimano Special Grease. Phil is good too);
--Good quality floor pump including good-quality chuck for your particular valves (I use a Silca Pista Plus with Hiro chuck for Presta valves);
--Tire valve core tool (I think these would be used if you are tubeless and need to remove the valve core);
--Decent floor stand if your bike can be lifted into one;

Fun tools but completely unnecessary: Angle gauge; digital bike (expensive) or luggage (cheap) scale.

This list is what I can think of off the top of my head, but should be a good start for most home shops. YMMV. There are of course very specialized tools like dropout alignment tools, headset cup and race removers/installers, etc. These can be pricy and not used very often, but many can be fabricated at home. I may add to this list as I think of things.

Last edited by smd4; 06-30-22 at 12:34 PM.
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Old 06-30-22, 11:22 AM
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If you have the tools to repack hubs and "do" a chain, you have a great start!
Just buy quality tools as you need them.
Avoid multi tools. Cheap ones will screw up fasteners and IF there are good expensive ones, you pay for bits you probably won't use.
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Old 06-30-22, 12:10 PM
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Wise people once told me to buy the quality tools that I specifically need for the bikes I have as and when I needed them. That advice has never let me down. I say take an inventory of the components of your bikes and match your toolkit accordingly. And yeah, buy the quality stuff: Park Tool (of course,) Pedro's (no-nonsense,) IceToolz (a bit underappreciated,) Uniche (look them up; their stepless tool is really great and they make a bunch of other great stuff.)
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Old 06-30-22, 01:11 PM
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Originally Posted by sjanzeir View Post
Wise people once told me to buy the quality tools that I specifically need for the bikes I have as and when I needed them. That advice has never let me down. I say take an inventory of the components of your bikes and match your toolkit accordingly. And yeah, buy the quality stuff: Park Tool (of course,) Pedro's (no-nonsense,) IceToolz (a bit underappreciated,) Uniche (look them up; their stepless tool is really great and they make a bunch of other great stuff.)
So you expect the advice to be different than what "the wise people" told you 6 years ago?
Are you inferring we're stupid now?
This is simply a rehash of what you already asked.
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Old 06-30-22, 01:18 PM
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Originally Posted by smd4 View Post
--Ball-peen hammer;
--JIS (Japanese) Phillips head screwdriver, probably No. 2 will cover you in most instances;
--Metric Allen key set (the "L" shaped ones);
--Chain Tool (type depending on what you use--rivets, quick links, etc.);
What do you use the ball peen hammer for?

FWIW, I've found I use a #1 Phillips more than a #2. That's mostly for derailer limit screws and canti brake lateral adjustment.

My wonderful daughter bought me a set of Wera hex wrenches for Christmas a few years ago. I'd never spend that much money on a hex wrench set (OK, I did ask her for them!), but whenever I see a major bout of Bicycle Mechanic about to start, I take them from the air-conditioned house out to the garage just for the pleasure of using them.

The Park CT-3(.x) chain tool beats the stuffings out of the puny CT-5. I bought the CT-3 when I needed to grab the handle of the CT-5 with locking pliers and turn the handle with another pair of pliers to shorten a new chain. Now I just grab the CT-3, put the chain in, and pop the rivet out.
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Old 06-30-22, 01:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
So you expect the advice to be different than what "the wise people" told you 6 years ago?
Are you inferring we're stupid now?
This is simply a rehash of what you already asked.
I know you have me on "ignore," but that's pretty harsh. BTW, sjanzeir would be "implying," you would be inferring.
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Old 06-30-22, 01:24 PM
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Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post
What do you use the ball peen hammer for?
We would use it, for example, to knock loose a stuck quill stem bolt (using a piece of wood to protect the bolt head). Quite a common occurrence in a shop. Besides, it's always wise to have a hammer in one's tool box; working with machines that are predominately metal makes a ball-peen a better choice than a claw hammer.
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Old 06-30-22, 01:32 PM
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Originally Posted by sjanzeir View Post
Wise people once told me to buy the quality tools that I specifically need for the bikes I have as and when I needed them.
I think for the most part, this is true. I already had most tools I need (I built my bike from the frame up), but a couple years ago, my right pedal loosened up. I had never thought about it until then, but I needed a specialized tool from Shimano that I didn't have. Was able to pick one up from eBay. When I wanted to change my gearing, I needed a chain whip. So some tools you use routinely, and some you add as you need them.
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Old 06-30-22, 01:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
So you expect the advice to be different than what "the wise people" told you 6 years ago?
Are you inferring we're stupid now?
This is simply a rehash of what you already asked.
So, what is it exactly that you're mad about? Is it that I'm rehashing good advice that I had been given by wise people six years ago, or that you weren't one of those people six years ago?
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Old 06-30-22, 01:57 PM
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Originally Posted by sjanzeir View Post
So, what is it exactly that you're mad about? Is it that I'm rehashing good advice that I had been given by wise people six years ago, or that you weren't one of those people six years ago?
Insanity is asking the same question and expecting different results.
I don't like insane people.
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Old 06-30-22, 02:00 PM
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Um, Bill--you do know that sjanzeir isn't the originator of this particular thread, right?
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Old 06-30-22, 02:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
Insanity is asking the same question and expecting different results.
I don't like insane people.
I'm not the one who started this thread. So you might wanna have your own sanity checked.

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Old 06-30-22, 02:02 PM
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Originally Posted by smd4 View Post
Um, Bill--you do know that sjanzeir isn't the originator of this particular thread, right?
Thank you!
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Old 06-30-22, 02:08 PM
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if you plan on doing majority of the work in the same area & very little if any mobile work, I'd invest in a roll around work cabinet/bench (49" length ballbearing drawers, woodblock topped) . To add that extra* bit to it, bolt down a 6" vice on top.

If you are doing repairs that require lugging around the tool sets, I'd invest in the easy stacking variable depth containers. With the right size, you could fit in a hefty BFH & some rather bulky contraptions.

With the above, you'll likely spend about the same to achieve one of those options, but if you know for certain the purpose you'll likely not regret the investment.


Regarding needing of a hammer... I've had relatives & friends question my tool inventory containing various hammers. Most of those same folks have stopped questioning it when they found themselves in need for a coercing tool in order to complete a task afterhours when the stores are closed & they have to finish a bathroom demo/brakes on there vehicle/free up a seat post, pop out a bushing.
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Old 06-30-22, 08:38 PM
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Always buy the absolute best tools you can cheap tools have no place in a useful toolbox unless you are loaded with money.

Park Tool makes OK hobbyist tools but any of their generic tools are not really worth it. There more specialist stuff is generally decently solid.

For the more generic tools, Wera, Wiha, Snap-On, Knipex, Felco, PB-Swiss, Vessel...(in no particular order) make some good stuff and they are well worth it.

Typically most bikes are metric and derailleurs use a JIS screw but a lot of modern screwdrivers are standardized as crosstip now so sort of a hybrid between all the stuff so it will work properly with JIS and Phillips and such.
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Old 07-01-22, 08:34 AM
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To be clear, I wasn't questioning "why a hammer?" but "why a ball peen hammer?" I've always found a handy claw hammer sufficient.
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Old 07-01-22, 08:41 AM
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Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post
To be clear, I wasn't questioning "why a hammer?" but "why a ball peen hammer?" I've always found a handy claw hammer sufficient.
You can use whatever hammer you want, though I doubt you'll find many claw hammers in bike shops. Traditionally, claw hammers are used for hammering nails and such; ball peen hammers are traditionally used for metal work. The peen can be used to massage the dents out of fenders or steel rims and things like that.

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Old 07-01-22, 08:53 AM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
For the more generic tools, Wera, Wiha, Snap-On, Knipex, Felco, PB-Swiss, Vessel...(in no particular order) make some good stuff and they are well worth it.
I'd say that even the brands that you can get at your local Home Depot of Lowes like Craftsman or Kobalt are more than sufficient.
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Old 07-01-22, 09:04 AM
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Originally Posted by smd4 View Post
You can use whatever hammer you want. Traditionally, claw hammers are used for hammering nails and such; ball peen hammers are traditionally used for metal work. The peen can be used to massage the dents out of fenders and such.
Or, you could do like we do in the Third World and use a valve hammer. What's a valve hammer, you ask? A valve hammer is big-ass intake valve out of a big-ass construction/mining/power generation engine with a piece of rebar welded to it. A valve hammer is most commonly used for bodywork repair, but it can and does work for other, undemanding, light-duty stuff as well.

You see, over here in the Third World, there are two kinds of people: Smart, masculine people and dumb, wimpy people. The smart people are the ones who make their own tools out of metal shavings and leftover aluminum foil as and when they need them. So when my mechanical engineer dad felt he needed a table grinding wheel, he just went ahead and built one

The wimps, on the other hand, are the fools who'd rather go to an actual hardware store and pay actual money for manufactured, mass-produced tools. So when I went to the store and bought me some new tools, I got marked for life as a wimpy fool because, you know, "you could've just stolen the stuff you needed! Or you could've just borrowed it from someone and just never given it back!" My dad tried to teach me how to be "smart" the hard way, and when he lost all hope (and I became numb from all the beatings) he just went ahead and kicked my mom and me out of the house, remarried and had three kids.

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Old 07-01-22, 06:42 PM
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having multiple types of hammers really can hammer a project home.
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Old 07-01-22, 07:33 PM
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Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post

FWIW, I've found I use a #1 Phillips more than a #2. That's mostly for derailer limit screws and canti brake lateral adjustment.
A No. 2 JIS is perfect for limit screws. Maybe not so much for a regular Phillips.
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Old 07-01-22, 08:20 PM
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Originally Posted by smd4 View Post
I'd say that even the brands that you can get at your local Home Depot of Lowes like Craftsman or Kobalt are more than sufficient.
I mean if you aren't working on your bike often then maybe. Especially hex wrenches and screwdrivers you want the best quality as you don't want to strip bolts and screws. The stuff at home despot and places like that are initially low cost but not really of much quality.

Maybe some tools that are rarely used would be fine as the cheap stuff but that is about it.
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Old 07-01-22, 08:29 PM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
I mean if you aren't working on your bike often then maybe. Especially hex wrenches and screwdrivers you want the best quality as you don't want to strip bolts and screws. The stuff at home despot and places like that are initially low cost but not really of much quality.

Maybe some tools that are rarely used would be fine as the cheap stuff but that is about it.
I guess I was referring to box/open end wrenches and such. Screw drivers and hex wrenches…absolutely.
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