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Buying a Dutch style bike in the US?

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Buying a Dutch style bike in the US?

Old 02-11-21, 09:16 AM
  #26  
HarborBandS
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I have heard of people importing actual used Dutch bikes in to Canada for resale. New Dutch bikes can be found in certain metro areas, but they are thousands of dollars.
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Old 02-11-21, 09:22 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by HarborBandS View Post
I have heard of people importing actual used Dutch bikes in to Canada for resale. New Dutch bikes can be found in certain metro areas, but they are thousands of dollars.
Canada? You’ve got JC Lind right there in Chicago: https://www.jclindbikes.com/bikes/city-bikes/

Oh, I see you’re saying used bikes...
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Old 02-11-21, 09:31 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
Canada? You’ve got JC Lind right there in Chicago: https://www.jclindbikes.com/bikes/city-bikes/

Oh, I see you’re saying used bikes...
Yeah, he will have to go used to hit his budget.

I actually have two neighbors within a block of me that have real Dutch bikes. One moved here from the Netherlands and brought her bike with her. The other bought an Urban Arrow electric cargo bike, and uses it in place of a car for most shorter trips--even in our rough Chicago winters.
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Old 02-11-21, 09:40 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by JaccoW View Post
Nobody mentioned Veloretti yet? Aluminum frames so they are a lot lighter too. And sub €400 + shipping.

B2C with singlespeed coasterbrake as standard with fenders and a chainguard standard. Can be easily adjusted to fit your needs if you require more speeds or extra braking power.

Nice. I'd be interested in one of those if they shipped to the US.
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Old 02-11-21, 09:54 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by s5fskzfv View Post
I just saw a youtube video about Dutch style bikes designed for comfortable low maintenance basic transportation. They have upright seating, coaster brakes, internal gears, a kickstand that has support on both sides of the bike, and a step through frame. I use a bike to get groceries once a week so this sounds like a good match for my needs.

Are there any bikes like this that can be purchased in the US that are not too expensive (under $500?, under 300?)
Have you checked out Workman Cycles....."Made in America"
One of their Folding Bikes may also fit the bill......
https://www.worksmancycles.com/

Last edited by Speedway2; 02-11-21 at 10:12 AM.
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Old 02-11-21, 10:17 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
Hey, looks like we have a Dutch bike specialist in the house!
I'm by no means an expert. More of an enthusiast.

Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
Nice. I'd be interested in one of those if they shipped to the US.
They are pretty common around here. Unfortunately they don't ship to the US it seems.

As for OP, plenty of options but very few new ones that hit that price point. Only if you go used. And you could certainly find people willing to ship them to you in the US.
If you want a Dutch quality bike, expect to pay at least €400-1000 + shipping + taxes.
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Old 02-11-21, 10:41 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by Speedway2 View Post
Have you checked out Workman Cycles....."Made in America"
One of their Folding Bikes may also fit the bill......
https://www.worksmancycles.com/
Those are a nightmare! Old standard bits are hard to find and service, and almost everything is steel, rusts, and is insanely heavy. They’re the kind of bikes you buy for your summer house, only ride one weekend because it’s easier to push it up the drive than pedal it, and leave in the shed for 25 years until a teenager in the next generation dusts it off and rides a couple of weekends for that finishing touch on their “summer of ‘69” before it goes back in the shed for another 25 years.
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Old 02-11-21, 01:32 PM
  #33  
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chaadster.......appears you have experience with Workman bikes. I have zero but they seem to be built well and priced ok.
Op is looking for a once a week grocery getter.

I remember the "summer of '69" and enjoyed it....Wait, are you referring to the movie?
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Old 02-11-21, 03:11 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by Speedway2 View Post
chaadster.......appears you have experience with Workman bikes. I have zero but they seem to be built well and priced ok.
Op is looking for a once a week grocery getter.

I remember the "summer of '69" and enjoyed it....Wait, are you referring to the movie?
Ha ha...no, not really. I saw one once at a bike show in Detroit, and was just shocked that it seemed to be made like a 1950s bike, probably with iron salvaged from scrapped battleships! This was years ago, but it seemed to have no standard parts on it, and was just so old and low tech, I couldn’t believe it was a new bike, nor imagine who would choose it or for what purpose. I think the chain is from a ‘39 farm tractor PTO grist mill attachment...you know, in case the river runs dry.

I don’t know where I pulled summer of ‘69 from, but probably that John Cougar Mellencamp song, cuz I don’t think I know the movie reference and I wasn’t around then yet myself.
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Old 02-11-21, 04:51 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
I don’t know where I pulled summer of ‘69 from, but probably that John Cougar Mellencamp song, cuz I don’t think I know the movie reference and I wasn’t around then yet myself.
That’s a Bryan Adams tune, actually, though JMC could have done fine with it, I’m sure.

Otto
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Old 02-11-21, 04:58 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by ofajen View Post
That’s a Bryan Adams tune, actually, though JMC could have done fine with it, I’m sure.

Otto
Oops, haha! Yes, you’re right. Thanks!
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Old 02-11-21, 09:11 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
Ha ha...no, not really. I saw one once at a bike show in Detroit, and was just shocked that it seemed to be made like a 1950s bike, probably with iron salvaged from scrapped battleships! This was years ago, but it seemed to have no standard parts on it, and was just so old and low tech, I couldn’t believe it was a new bike, nor imagine who would choose it or for what purpose. I think the chain is from a ‘39 farm tractor PTO grist mill attachment...you know, in case the river runs dry.
It exactly is a 1950's bike. An industrial 1950's bike, that you'd use to get around a big factory or a shipyard, where it'd be a really long walk (and they hadn't invented golf carts yet)
Their 2-wheelers are built extra-heavy to put up with the abuse of being ridden and tossed around in non bike-friendly environments, and not needing much maintenance. You can actually buy them through the Grainger supply catalog.
They also make a couple different flavors of 3- and 4-wheel 'cart' bikes for carrying tools, mail or parts. They've been around for over 100 years, but they only started marketing the two-wheelers 'recreationally' for the whole made-in-the-USA 'old-school' niche.
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Old 02-12-21, 11:48 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by Reflector Guy View Post
Is Dutch "style" an actual style?
Yes, they are English designs between 90 and 120 years old almost unchanged. Dutch innovation have been limited to the cloth chain case, durable paint and rust proofing, lowering mechanical drag, more tubing for rigidity lilke double top tube and cross frames, taller bikes, more load and carrying capacity and a lot related to standard practical things like lighting, weather proofing, ring locks, gear shifter protection, toolfree adjustable handlebars, female anatomy friendly saddles, things like that.

Even the modern aluminum bikes often have basically the same geometry as the over a 100 year old English inspiration.

So the question is what from the Dutch bike @s5fskzfv wants.
If it's the geometry and therefore riding posture and handling, it's about the angles of the saddle, pedals and handlebars, swept handlebars and the trail. Dutch bikes want to go straight.

If it's the weather proofing a full chainc case helps, allthough chains have become less vulnerable.

If it's the durability it depends on the brand, but also the reputable brands like Gazelle don't build them anymore like they did. But they will still last.

If it's a bout heavy loads on the rear, you might want an old style rear rack, especially the 'PTT Post'- rack named after the postal services.

Here in Dutchland the Dutch bikes are much cheaper than oversees, but I wouldn't buy a 200-300 euro one because they will have the simplicity and weather proofing but not the durability, a 40 year old Gazelle will last longer. So I'd look for a used one from Gazelle, Batavus, Workcycles or Azor (the latter two the most durable these days) or pay up and with shipping you'll probably looking over a 1000 dollar while here you can get an Azor or Gazelle for about 600-700 with some extra's like gears and handbrakes.

This American has found the real deal:

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Old 02-12-21, 02:51 PM
  #39  
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In my view while it's true that the prices for Dutch style bikes seem high, they come with everything. Finding after-parts that actually fit a regular bike could end up costing even more. I know this because I've assembled a bike that's close enough, by accumulating cast-off parts over the years, but when I look at modern bikes and add up the cost to build the same from new parts, it really adds up.

I personally find the bolt-upright posture to be uncomfortable, especially on hills, but it's not obligatory on those bikes. Most are reasonably adjustable.

Germane to the comment about buying a 40 year old bike, city bikes with fenders and chainguards were common in the US at one time, albeit with different aesthetics, and one could be refurbished to function quite well for the intended use.
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Old 02-12-21, 02:55 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by Gresp15C View Post
Germane to the comment about buying a 40 year old bike, city bikes with fenders and chainguards were common in the US at one time....
This, exactly. Those of us of a certain age all had them. We didn't call them by a certain style though.
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Old 02-13-21, 01:45 AM
  #41  
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The best bikes in the world of this style of bicycle were the women's frame, Chicago electroforged SCHWINNS!

You have the women's frames of the 3 SPEED models (from about 1948, --circa 1950 or so UNTIL ABOUT THE CHICAGO END circa 1982)

You also have the women's frames of 5 SPEED COLLEGIATE from 1964 through 1977.

You also have the women's frames of 5 SPEED SUBURBAN (has 27 inch wheels ...32-630mm tire) from 1970 through 1976

(-----the Collegiate & Suburban do go beyond 1977 / 1976 but with FFS ,forward freewheel system----- so we won't discuss them but they are still fine bikes...)


*****************the 3 SPEED women's SCHWINNS from circa 1950 to circa 1980:
ALL OF THESE HAVE THE 597mm twenty six inch steel Schwinn wheels
(Yes, Schwinn did at times also offer the same model in both twenty six inch wheels and twenty four inch wheels----WE WILL LIMIT DISCUSSION TO 26 inch(597) ).
You see the 26 inch (597) 26 x 1 3/8 , 37mm-597mm tire models were available during every model year from about the late 1940's to the Chicago end circa 1982.

Basically Schwinn called these Women's 3 SPEEDS by various names, but they were the same bicycle. Let me explain with several examples.
1961 the Women's RACER had painted fenders and the Women's TRAVELER had chrome fenders, a headlight & generator , but essentially the same with just paint color differences
So you see, that they were much the same and in around 1961 and the early sixties, you probably only had the single 19" women's. frame.
1962: The women'sTRAVELER was the fancier version of the women's RACER.
1963: The CO-ED name replaces the women's RACER name...........women's TRAVELER still the fancier one.
1965: The BREEZE name replaces the name CO-ED..............women's TRAVELER still the fancier one, though there is also a Deluxe BREEZE which is fancy too.
1966: Last year of the women's TRAVELER..........The BREEZE is the name that will carry on through the late seventies
BY THE LATE SIXTIES, YOU HAVE TWO FRAME SIZE CHOICES in the BREEZE (choice of 17 inch or 19 inch)
1973 model BREEZE 3 speed has three frame size choices ( 17, 19, or 21 inch frames) (the women's Collegiate 5 speed had offered three frame sizes at least since the 1971 model year, but the Breeze didn't get the large 21" frame until 1973.
----Schwinn made the wall of the frame headtube thicker and stronger for 1966 model year, thus all 1966 and later Schwinn frames take a 21.1mm diam stem and the 1965 stem(22.2mm) will not fit a 1966 and vice versa......




The WOMEN's SCHWINN Five SPEEDS ( 1964 - 1977 COLLEGIATE) and (1970 - 1976 SUBURBAN 5 SPEED).
******All of these have 46 TEETH on the frontcrankChainwheel*******
1964 through 1969 COLLEGIATE has a 43 to 85 GEAR Range
1970 through 1977 COLLEGIATE has a 37 to 85 GEAR Range
1970 through 1976 SUBURBAN 5 SPEED (27 inch - 630mm WHEELS) has a 39 to 89 GEAR RANGE

1964-1969 has freewheel of 28, 24, 20, 16, 14
1970-1977 has freewheel of 32, 26, 21, 17, 14
Suburban 5 speed has the same Model J freewheel of the 1970 onward Collegiate.....32, 26, 21, 17, 14

The 1970 through 1973 and into early 1974 Collegiate/Suburban 5 speed HAS the SHIMANO built GT-100 REAR DERAILLEUR.
The 1974 onward Collegiate/Suburban 5 speed has the SHIMANO built GT-120 REAR DERAILLEUR
The 1964-1969 COLLEGIATE has the Huret Allvit rear derailleur.
Schwinn GT100 derailleur
The Schwinn Approved GT-100 derailleur
(NOTE: the disraeli.. site is WRONG as the GT-100 was introduced in 1970 and that it shifts a 32 cog, so thats obviously more than 28.)
(Note: the disraeli site is also WRONG as the GT-120 shifts a 32 cog which is obviously more than 28)
Schwinn GT120 derailleur
https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...-derailer.html
https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...ollegiate.html
https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...te-womens.html
https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...-branding.html

https://thecabe.com/forum/threads/sc...olume-2.81579/
https://thecabe.com/forum/threads/sc...olume-1.81415/

https://www.sheldonbrown.com/opc.html
https://www.bikeforums.net/singlespe...-question.html
https://bikeshedva.blogspot.com/p/cl...ce-cranks.html

https://waterfordbikes.com/SchwinnCa...0/1970_31.html
https://waterfordbikes.com/SchwinnCa...0/1970_16.html
https://waterfordbikes.com/SchwinnCa...0/1970_17.html
https://waterfordbikes.com/SchwinnCa...0/1971_20.html
(NOTE: Remember that the 3 SPEED SUBURBAN was only offered in 1970 and 1971......discontinued after 1971.....only the 5 speed and 10speed returned in '72.)

https://waterfordbikes.com/SchwinnCa...0/1972_23.html

You should browse through the Schwin Catalogs of the Sixties and Seventies.
You have some women's frame CONTINENTAL tourist and VARSITY tourist models of 10 SPEEDS in the Sixties.
The Varsity of the late sixties through the late seventies has the 52/39 front crank and the 28, 24, 20, 16, 14 freewheel ( Suburban 10 speed has same gearing).
Varsity tourist model was discontinued after 1969. Suburban 10 speed is essentially the varsity tourist with the tubular front fork of the Continental.
YOU CAN EASILY CONVERT A SEVENTIES ERA WOMEN'S VARSITY to UPRIGHT (you'll need the 7881 Schwinn handlebars and Weinmann or Diacompe tourist hand brake levers for 22.2(7/8") handlebar.......alternatively you can choose whatever tourist style handlebar from whatever-wherever as long as it fits the 25.4(1") stem clamp.....The $10 BELL Pitcrew600 replacement cable set has everything you'll need EXCEPT FOR A TOOL ( bicycleBrake Cable Cutter-pliers). Walmart.com, some Walmart stores, and ACE hardware's website, not in ACE stores.
Don't like the idea of a 10 SPEED.......heck you can turn the VARSITY into a 5 speed.........as easy as it is to remove/replace& service the two #64 (number sixty four) caged Crank Bearings................YOU CAN CHANGE THE CRANKWHEEL(s) out and you do not need a new crank....virtually any crankwheel, from any brand, not just Schwinn will fit as long as it came from a one-piece crank.............typically anything like 42, 43, 44, 46, or 48 should be good with the freewheel of fourteen to twenty-eight. You have the ability to go with smaller than 39 for the crank if you wish.....but you should be careful to calculate what might be most useful, before doing so.

Other than a used $5 copy from the bay of the old book "GLENNS COMPLETE BICYCLE MANUAL 338 pages by Clarence Coles & Harold T. Glenn.....You won't need much as the old Chicago Schwinns are extremely simple and extremely well built. Yes, a byproduct of that indestructible built like a tank quality that old Schwinns are famous for, comes a few more pounds of weight. On such a simple Dutch style, step-through Upright city cruiser, weight doesn't matter much because you're not gonna set any speed records, even with a really lightweight city dutch style bike. These ancient Schwinns ride great and their durability & reliability cannot be beat.
There are frame sizes and color choices that are sure to please anyone. The factory Schwinn Approved mattress seat probably weighs 4 pounds so you could install an aftermarket modern seat that probably weighs two pounds less. Stay thin ride a Schwinn. There are no better bicycles of this simply style of bicycle than those ancient Schwinns.
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Old 02-13-21, 03:24 AM
  #42  
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Whoa!

Vintage Schwinns have appealing virtues, but I wouldn’t get too carried away with it. A modern bike of the “simple style” is better in virtually every regard: they’re lighter, stop better, shift better with a wider gear range for better versatility and better efficiency. Parts are readily available, inexpensive, and servicing is much easier requiring fewer tools.

As a vintage Schwinn owner, I can appreciate their low cost, durability, and style— I picked up a sweet pair of his-n-hers Collegiates about 16 years ago at a garage sale for $20 each— but both my wife and I got sick of the low-quality ride; they just don’t go well by modern standards. Add cargo to the mix, and you’ve got a noodly mess of a bike to wrangle.

While a vintage Schwinn can suit some people’s needs well, I think the factors which make those bikes most suitable have nothing at all to do with their comparative qualities as bicycles, which is to say what I said before, namely that modern bikes of the same style are better in virtually every regard. But, if you don’t want to spend $600 or more, yes, an old Schwinn of this type is a great choice, especially if where you ride is flat.
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Old 02-13-21, 12:14 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by Gresp15C View Post
I personally find the bolt-upright posture to be uncomfortable, especially on hills, but it's not obligatory on those bikes. Most are reasonably adjustable.
I’d agree. It’s hard to deal with any situation where real work is needed if you are bolt upright. Even 10 or 15 degrees forward really lets you engage your core and arms and work hard if you need to and is still really comfortable.

I’ve taken to using touring bars and that cockpit seems optimal for my SS riding. I use a long stem and wrap the whole bar forward of the levers and grips, so it’s more like the cockpit of a Jones bike, with a really useful range of positions.

Otto

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Old 02-14-21, 09:32 AM
  #44  
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[QUOTE=s5fskzfv;21917847]

"Are there any bikes like this that can be purchased in the US that are not too expensive (under $500?, under 300?)?"

Used, or the actual Swiss Army Bike.

In Asia there are bikes that resemble circa 1930s everyman- bikes. I had one in Thailand back in the 60s. It weighed a ton.
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Old 02-14-21, 10:29 AM
  #45  
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"saw one once at a bike show in Detroit, and was just shocked that it seemed to be made like a 1950s bike, probably with iron salvaged from scrapped battleships!"

Reminds me of Navy shipyards and most military flight lines.

There used to be trikes and cruisers at different shops to run parts, tools, and mail around the base.

I don't know if it still is the case... but we got lots of cruiser time back in the 70s
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Old 02-15-21, 12:51 PM
  #46  
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Raleigh Sports

I'm seeing some road-bike mentality in these answers, what with all the focus on weight and steel-is-bad comments. The OP wants an urban grocery-getter. I'd look for the British equivalent of Dutch bikes, the Raleigh Sport. In fact I have looked for them; we have several, that we first bought as tweed ride steeds, but mine is now my absolute favorite neighborhood bike. Supremely comfortable. All steel, heavy yes but on flat neighborhood roads that makes zero difference. I paid $200 for my 1966, with new tires and every bearing already replaced. Some have factory racks, but they're easy enough to add if yours doesn't. A side kickstand is standard but that can be replaced by the 2-legged ones the OP mentions wanting. And for those who think they can't possibly ride more than a block on something like this, the photo below shows a whole flock of these on the annual "Three Speed Tour" of Lake Pepin, MN, which is a 2-day 80-mile ride limited, not surprisingly, to 3-speed bikes.
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Old 02-15-21, 12:51 PM
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Uncle G, I had a thai bike for a while, a "Hare", had a seat on the back with foot pegs. Geometry was too small.

Below is my current "Shopper", low gear is about 25 gear inches so I get a little workout on my back from the store.



Just back from the Safeway. Somewhere in there is a gallon of milk and 18 eggs. A mile downhill there. A mile uphill back.
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Old 02-15-21, 01:43 PM
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The problem I have with "Dutch Bikes" is that they are designed for a flat place,with no hills so they are heavy and have no climbing gears. Personally I lean towards a more German style with similar accessories but aluminum frames, wider gearing and disk or V brakes for better power. This is going to be more like $750-$1000 like the old Novara Gotham family, or just find a used hybrid and accessorize as needed. My utility ride is an older Kona hardtail with a rigid fork, rack and fenders that will grind up the steepest hills and cruise in comfort with moderate loads. The only thing missing is a chain guard
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Old 02-15-21, 01:59 PM
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Priority has some options, slightly out of the OP's $500 max, but they do have sales every now and then. The Priority Classic I bought, with fenders, rack, and front brake add-ons, didn't cost much more than that a few years back.

It got me back into cycling, but I ended up not riding it much after learning that the 3-speed upright tank style of bike (weight-wise it's under 30 lb, but handling is another story) wasn't that useful to get around non-flat Seattle. I realized that I much preferred to get to my destination as quickly as possible under my own power, because frankly there are hardly any bike routes connecting places people need to go (i.e., commutes and shopping) that are pleasant enough to enjoy at a leisurely pace.
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Old 02-15-21, 02:32 PM
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I know the OP has ghosted this thread, but for anyone following along who might be interested in Dutch-style options, here’s another which may be the low-cost leader:



That’s a $479 Civia Lowry 7spd. Yeah, it’s naked in a distinctly non-Dutch way, but one could pop a rack on and be right on top of $500USD. There’s also a single-speed version at $399.

I thought Civia kicked the bucket several years ago, but either I was wrong or they were revived, and they can be found in bike shops, too.

https://civiacycles.com/bikes/lowry-step-thru

EDIT: notably, Civia says weight is between 23 & 25lbs.

Last edited by chaadster; 02-15-21 at 02:46 PM.
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