Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Im going coast to coast!

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Im going coast to coast!

Old 03-22-21, 10:28 PM
  #1  
NW Cyclist
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Beaverton OR
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Im going coast to coast!

I've decided I'm finally going to ride coast to coast before I get too old I have 90 days to complete the ride and drive back. I plan to ride 60-65 miles a day with one day a week rest. I'd like to take a couple weeks to get back so when you calculate it out I can go about 3800-3900 miles. I'd like to start in Oregon/Washington coast. My biggest issue now is the route. I've spent a lot of time on the adventure cycling site and have a few options, but I thought it would best to ask experienced touring cyclists I'm going to be spoiled as my wife is going to be my SWAG wagon in an RV and friends will join me along the way. Any input would be greatly appreciated.
Chris
NW Cyclist is offline  
Likes For NW Cyclist:
Old 03-22-21, 10:38 PM
  #2  
10 Wheels
Galveston County Texas
 
10 Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: In The Wind
Posts: 32,067

Bikes: 02 GTO, 2011 Magnum

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1045 Post(s)
Liked 584 Times in 293 Posts
Try for 75 a day. You may not need a rest day.
__________________
Fred "The Real Fred"

10 Wheels is offline  
Likes For 10 Wheels:
Old 03-23-21, 12:24 AM
  #3  
jamawani 
Hooked on Touring
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 2,694
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 234 Post(s)
Liked 61 Times in 44 Posts
NWC -
Glad to hear you are going to ride X-USA, but you don't give us much to go on.
I doubt you are 19, but are you 45? 65? 85? It makes a difference.
Also, how much riding/touring experience do you have? The two are different, btw.
(But if you have a sag wagon, you probably won't carry more than a granola bar.)
When are you thinking bout doing this? Starting in May or August could mean different routes.

Although it's not a designated ACA route, one route with the most gradual climbing
starts in Westport, WA via Raymond, Chehalis, Packwood and White Pass.
Don't be fooled by the Columbia River - lots of climbing and fairly busy roads.
The TransAm also has a chunk of climbing getting over the Cascades.
If you don't overdo it the first week, you will settle in fine.

Best - J
jamawani is offline  
Likes For jamawani:
Old 03-23-21, 07:54 AM
  #4  
NW Cyclist
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Beaverton OR
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Im going coast to coast

Thank you for the reply. I am 57 years old. I want to leave in early June. I've done many 100+ rides and Seattle to Portland (STP) in a day 5 times so I enjoy long rides. My longest tour was to San Francisco (1100 miles). I remember exactly what you said about settling in when I went to SF. After a few days I got stronger as the ride continued but that was a few years ago

Originally Posted by jamawani View Post
NWC -
Glad to hear you are going to ride X-USA, but you don't give us much to go on.
I doubt you are 19, but are you 45? 65? 85? It makes a difference.
Also, how much riding/touring experience do you have? The two are different, btw.
(But if you have a sag wagon, you probably won't carry more than a granola bar.)
When are you thinking bout doing this? Starting in May or August could mean different routes.

Although it's not a designated ACA route, one route with the most gradual climbing
starts in Westport, WA via Raymond, Chehalis, Packwood and White Pass.
Don't be fooled by the Columbia River - lots of climbing and fairly busy roads.
The TransAm also has a chunk of climbing getting over the Cascades.
If you don't overdo it the first week, you will settle in fine.

Best - J
NW Cyclist is offline  
Old 03-23-21, 10:34 AM
  #5  
jamawani 
Hooked on Touring
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 2,694
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 234 Post(s)
Liked 61 Times in 44 Posts
Well, NWC -
You is still young.

If you are leaving early-ish - early to mid May -
You might consider driving east and starting from the Atlantic coast.
That way you might miss some late bad weather in the Pac NW
and miss the late summer heat in the East. (Which is brutal, btw.)

A later start makes sense west-to-east.
I am a big believer in water's edge to water's edge.
Preferably with ocean waves and sand.
Harder on the east coast than the west, but doable.

The sag wagon will come in handy many times.
But it precludes you from hiker/biker options in national parks.
Many park campgrounds are already booked solid for this summer.
It may require a more fixed itinerary than usually comfortable.

<<<>>>

One idea -

Since you have the sag wagon, cross at I-90 at Vantage.
Then shuttle to the boat landing at the bottom of the Old Vantage Highway.
Riding up thru the columnar cliffs is supreme.
(And I would think it qualifies a s"legit" X-USA.)
jamawani is offline  
Old 03-23-21, 06:01 PM
  #6  
Fuji1986
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2020
Location: Vermont
Posts: 19

Bikes: 1989 Miyata 618GT, 1986 Fuji Sagres, 1986 Fuji Touring Series III

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 7 Posts
Best wishes to you. I would double-check on services along the route since businesses have taken a beating in the past year, and plenty have gone under. Keep in touch with your progress; a cross-country ride is something special!
Fuji1986 is offline  
Old 03-23-21, 07:14 PM
  #7  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
indyfabz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 31,005
Mentioned: 199 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13727 Post(s)
Liked 6,566 Times in 3,348 Posts
Originally Posted by Fuji1986 View Post
Best wishes to you. I would double-check on services along the route since businesses have taken a beating in the past year, and plenty have gone under. Keep in touch with your progress; a cross-country ride is something special!
+1. And as noted, finding open spots at campgrounds could be tough in places. There are Walmart parking lots if necessary.
indyfabz is offline  
Old 03-24-21, 03:35 AM
  #8  
Tony Marley
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Houston area
Posts: 481

Bikes: Bike Friday Llama single; Bike Friday Tandem Tuesday; Easy Racers Ti-Rush recumbent; Catrike Expedition; Rans Seavo recumbent tandem

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 18 Times in 16 Posts
Where do you want to start, and where do you want to finish up? Obviously makes a difference in the route and distance. I did it twice: first time from the mouth of the Columbia River to Portland, Maine (by way of Ottawa, Canada), and the second time from Seattle to Rehoboth Beach, Delaware. First time with another guy; second time with my then 10-year old daughter on a tandem. Each vastly different.
Tony Marley is offline  
Old 03-24-21, 10:00 AM
  #9  
mev
bicycle tourist
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Austin, Texas, USA
Posts: 1,896

Bikes: Trek 520, Lightfoot Ranger, Trek 4500

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 291 Post(s)
Liked 87 Times in 66 Posts
Originally Posted by Tony Marley View Post
Where do you want to start, and where do you want to finish up? Obviously makes a difference in the route and distance.
Agreed. I think you can make a variety of different routes work pretty well, and depends a bit on where you want to travel.

I've gone across three times and once across Canada:
-- 1992: "Portland to Portland", though I started at the coast near Astoria. I went up the Columbia River Gorge, across to Lolo Pass and then across to the Twin Cities. I stayed in the US by going by way of the UP and then south of the Great Lakes and across New England to Portland.
-- 2001: San Jose to Jacksonville. Mostly on Adventure Cycling Southern Tier
-- 2002-2004: Sequence of eight one week trips: San Jose to Reno, Reno to Salt Lake City, Salt Lake City to Fort Collins, Fort Collins to Wichita, Wichita to Memphis, Memphis to Cincinnati, Cincinnati to Pittsburgh

A few general thoughts related to this:
1. Going in the summer doesn't make sense to do a Southern Tier, so more across the middle or northern US. I went West to East, but you'll want to work constraints on snowpack in western passes and potential hot/humid if you go too far south in later summer. Depending on timing/route an east to west might make more sense.
2. The Adventure Cycling route is nice for meeting others along the way, as well as knowing services. Because you have SAG support, both might become not as big of an issue.
3. I approached things a bit different between Western US and Eastern US:
- In the West, I tended to follow major US highway routes. There weren't as many choices and I could make most any of them work.
- In the East, there are more choices and I found myself working a bit more to find smaller roads but still going direct. This was also where Adventure Cycling or similar routes were sometimes helpful
4. The biggest factor affecting my routes were really some of the places I wanted to go along the way, as well as some artificial constraints like staying in the US, etc.
mev is offline  
Likes For mev:
Old 03-25-21, 07:49 AM
  #10  
pdlamb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 6,928

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1612 Post(s)
Liked 839 Times in 521 Posts
More random observations:
ACA Northern Tier, Washington 20: I'm glad I had two months' riding in my legs before I tackled four passes in four days.

ACA TransAm maps/route was invaluable getting across the Ozarks in Missouri and eastern Kentucky. (You are in a maze of twisty little passages, all different...) With some experience touring, you can probably pick out good routes most of the rest of the country.

I wonder how local police would respond to a request to park on the town square or park overnight in an RV. Probably depends on the town. I've heard some Walmarts now turn overnight RVs away, but a personal request to the manager might mitigate that.

Having a support vehicle would make it easier to ride an extra hour in the evening, knowing you can be picked up and taken somewhere else for the night. You could arrange a water resupply every 30 miles in the dry spots, too. But don't forget the local diner where you'll meet half the down for lunch!

There's probably a balance to be found between locating local attractions on your own custom-generated route and tying yourself down to a specific route when you find the road is under construction or there's a bridge out.
pdlamb is online now  
Old 03-28-21, 10:43 AM
  #11  
NW Cyclist
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Beaverton OR
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Im going coast to coast

So many choices! All such great information. Thank you very much. I wish I had more time. A 90 leave is all I could get from work! I agree with the ocean to ocean idea. Being an Oregon native I also was thinking Portland to Portland but that is too many miles for my time frame. I was thinking LA to New York. Thought that would cool. I can follow a variety of ACA routes and do it in ~3800 miles. Leaves me a couple weeks to drive back. I'm amazed some of you have done it MULTIPLE times. Impressive.
NW Cyclist is offline  
Old 03-28-21, 03:51 PM
  #12  
mev
bicycle tourist
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Austin, Texas, USA
Posts: 1,896

Bikes: Trek 520, Lightfoot Ranger, Trek 4500

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 291 Post(s)
Liked 87 Times in 66 Posts
Originally Posted by NW Cyclist View Post
I also was thinking Portland to Portland but that is too many miles for my time frame. I was thinking LA to New York. Thought that would cool. I can follow a variety of ACA routes and do it in ~3800 miles.
For what it is worth, my Portland to Portland ride was 3610 miles. The tail end gives stopping points and distances - Across the USA in '92

That was 1992 and I was a bit more intense than I would ride it now. Six weeks including 37 full days riding, two rest days underway and two days in Boston visiting friends before going up to Portland to finish.

If you are thinking of starting further south, I might suggest San Francisco as a starting point rather than Los Angeles. The deserts you cross after LA are lower in elevation and thus hotter in southern Nevada than crossing the middle of Nevada. You can see it if you compare climate averages between Las Vegas NV and Fallon NV: https://weatherspark.com/compare/y/2...gas-and-Fallon
mev is offline  
Old 03-31-21, 07:07 AM
  #13  
Tony Marley
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Houston area
Posts: 481

Bikes: Bike Friday Llama single; Bike Friday Tandem Tuesday; Easy Racers Ti-Rush recumbent; Catrike Expedition; Rans Seavo recumbent tandem

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 18 Times in 16 Posts
Remember to focus on enjoying the ride, not just surviving and completing the ride. So that should factor into your route planning. Pretty and/or interesting, but a little bit longer is better than miserable but shorter. That goes, too, for planning how far to ride each day. Allowing yourself time to stop and read historical markers, or eat at roadside fruit stands, and to enjoy the communities and diners in the evenings can be the best part of a cross-continent ride.

One of my most fun/interesting tours was a 10-day "tailwind ride." A friend and his daughter on their tandem, and my daughter and me on our tandem. Started in Garden City, Kansas. Basically the very center of the Great Plains. Each morning, we checked the weather channel and then rode whichever direction the wind was blowing. No plan other than that, just an interest to see where we'd end up after 10 days of tailwinds. Only repeated one section of the ride, and ultimately ended up in southern Nebraska, east and north of where we started.

Good luck, and hopefully tailwinds coast to coast....
Tony Marley is offline  
Old 03-31-21, 08:20 AM
  #14  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 8,448

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1966 Perfekt 3 Speed AB Hub, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2337 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 582 Times in 478 Posts
Keep your daily itinerary as flexible as you can. For example, my month long solo Iceland tour, there were two days that I quit early due to strong head winds. But there were two days that I had good tailwinds that I hated to waste, thus pushed on after I had reached my planned destination on those two days.

For example, one of the days that I quit early, I was unable to climb a hill and it was not that steep. But the headwind with gusty sidewinds, maybe I could have climbed that hill if there was a wide shoulder? But when you are pedaling up a hill at about 4 mph into a headwind and a strong sidewind gust tries to put you in the ditch, and there was no shoulder on a road with moderately busy traffic, there were many times on that hill when I came to a halt with both feet on the ground. I only went 10.6 miles that day before I turned around. The next day, hardly noticed the hill.

I assume you will be sleeping most nights in the RV. On my longer tours, I never planned a non-riding day very far in advance, if there was a day in the forecast that would have terrible riding weather, I tried to find a nice place to stop the night before that day in case I wanted to stay put for a day to sit out bad weather.

You have done enough long distance riding, I am sure you have the hardware figured out. But I am curious, how many bikes are you taking? If I was doing a trip like that where I am in an RV every night, I would have a low geared light weight bike for hills. And another bike that I like on flatter ground. One bike would have fenders for rain. One bike would have tires for rougher pavement. Or maybe one bike but with an option for clip on fenders and two wheel sets?
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Old 04-04-21, 11:35 PM
  #15  
NW Cyclist
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Beaverton OR
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Im going coast to coast

Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
Keep your daily itinerary as flexible as you can. For example, my month long solo Iceland tour, there were two days that I quit early due to strong head winds. But there were two days that I had good tailwinds that I hated to waste, thus pushed on after I had reached my planned destination on those two days.

For example, one of the days that I quit early, I was unable to climb a hill and it was not that steep. But the headwind with gusty sidewinds, maybe I could have climbed that hill if there was a wide shoulder? But when you are pedaling up a hill at about 4 mph into a headwind and a strong sidewind gust tries to put you in the ditch, and there was no shoulder on a road with moderately busy traffic, there were many times on that hill when I came to a halt with both feet on the ground. I only went 10.6 miles that day before I turned around. The next day, hardly noticed the hill.

I assume you will be sleeping most nights in the RV. On my longer tours, I never planned a non-riding day very far in advance, if there was a day in the forecast that would have terrible riding weather, I tried to find a nice place to stop the night before that day in case I wanted to stay put for a day to sit out bad weather.

You have done enough long distance riding, I am sure you have the hardware figured out. But I am curious, how many bikes are you taking? If I was doing a trip like that where I am in an RV every night, I would have a low geared light weight bike for hills. And another bike that I like on flatter ground. One bike would have fenders for rain. One bike would have tires for rougher pavement. Or maybe one bike but with an option for clip on fenders and two wheel sets?
I just finished my route and Iím going 60% ACA and 40% on my own. Itís 3600 miles and I average 62 miles a day so I have time to adjust and see some fun places and take longer if needed. I will be taking a spare bike. Didnít think about different tires. Expected good climbs in the Rockies but not so much in the northeast. I will be in great shape by then though. Haha. Thanks for all the terrific input. I canít wait to get started!
NW Cyclist is offline  
Old 04-05-21, 11:33 AM
  #16  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 8,448

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1966 Perfekt 3 Speed AB Hub, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2337 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 582 Times in 478 Posts
It is my understanding that some parts of the Appalachians can have very steep hills. My only experience in that area is GAP and C&O, those are fairly flat so I have no direct experience with the rest of the Appalachians.

That compares to Pacific Coast and the rockies where I have usually found max slopes in the 6 to 8 percent grade range.
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Old 04-05-21, 11:28 PM
  #17  
saddlesores
Senior Member
 
saddlesores's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Bangkok...and....Hainan
Posts: 3,305

Bikes: inferior steel....and....noodly aluminium

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 878 Post(s)
Liked 172 Times in 119 Posts
Originally Posted by NW Cyclist View Post
I've decided I'm finally going to ride coast to coast before I get too old I have 90 days to complete the ride and drive back. I plan to ride 60-65 miles a day with one day a week rest. I'd like to take a couple weeks to get back so when you calculate it out I can go about 3800-3900 miles. I'd like to start in Oregon/Washington coast. My biggest issue now is the route. I've spent a lot of time on the adventure cycling site and have a few options, but I thought it would best to ask experienced touring cyclists I'm going to be spoiled as my wife is going to be my SWAG wagon in an RV and friends will join me along the way. Any input would be greatly appreciated.
Chris
jinkies! why even bother planning? nothing to worry about here. you have a significant other following you in a mobile hotel, carrying all your luggage, gear, spares, tools, food....nothing for you to do but peddle. gosh, you even get a spare bike? you can choose road bike or mountain bike depending on terrain!

route too trafficky, unsafe, or too steep? load it into the rv! heck, you can skip the 200-mile boring sections of same-sameness.

tired and won't make your goal for the day? stop at the nearest rest area, wally world parking lot, or truck stop, sleep in the rv.

you don't need to do route planning like a self-supported tour. you're not limited to roads suitable for bikes. no worries about getting across restricted bridges, or that rough patch heading into detroit.
saddlesores is offline  
Old 04-08-21, 11:09 AM
  #18  
Radfield
Newbie
 
Radfield's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have a good route plan for Seattle to Boston

I have a plan on ride with GPS called
Seattle to Boston. EZ

hit me up if you would like to discuss. It is 3559 miles. Once out of Washington, Oregon it follows US HWY 20.

I am leaving 6/5 planning to arrive 90 days later (avg 45 miles a day)

my email is
radfield at att.net.
I would love to chat live if youíre interested

Rad Justice
Radfield is offline  
Old 04-08-21, 11:28 AM
  #19  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
indyfabz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 31,005
Mentioned: 199 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13727 Post(s)
Liked 6,566 Times in 3,348 Posts
Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
It is my understanding that some parts of the Appalachians can have very steep hills.
Sure can. And what I dislike the most is when you encounter sections with a good number of shorter, steeper climbs back to back to back...Had a some sections like that crossing PA last September. I think my ruling grade was 11.8%. I much prefer longer, more moderately graded climbs. It's nice to be able to get into a rhythm.
indyfabz is offline  
Old 04-08-21, 01:58 PM
  #20  
KPREN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2021
Location: Wadsworth, Ohio
Posts: 252

Bikes: 2008 S Works Stumpjumper FSR Carbon, 2016 E Fat Titanium Bike Custom built by me.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 94 Post(s)
Liked 106 Times in 71 Posts
Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
It is my understanding that some parts of the Appalachians can have very steep hills. My only experience in that area is GAP and C&O, those are fairly flat so I have no direct experience with the rest of the Appalachians..
That is an understatement. Here is a typical screen shot of Google Maps centered on eastern Kentucky and western West Virginia. The biggest answer you will get for asking directions will be "You can't get there from here" , If you can understand what they are saying and they are speaking about driving an automobile. These are main roads. What is in between you better have a good fat bike and a guide. There is generally no shoulders and few guard rails. Go there at look at street view and imagine a big coal truck or a logging truck barreling down on you with a bicycle. Bicyclist not on the main bicycle routes are considered by locals as someone whom lost their drivers license to DWI. You get respect accordingly. 15%+ grades are common
KPREN is offline  
Old 04-09-21, 07:25 PM
  #21  
Doug64
Senior Member
 
Doug64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Oregon
Posts: 6,140
Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1031 Post(s)
Liked 432 Times in 256 Posts
Originally Posted by Radfield View Post
I have a plan on ride with GPS called
Seattle to Boston. EZ

hit me up if you would like to discuss. It is 3559 miles. Once out of Washington, Oregon it follows US HWY 20.

I am leaving 6/5 planning to arrive 90 days later (avg 45 miles a day)

my email is
radfield at att.net.
I would love to chat live if you’re interested

Rad Justice
My wife and I rode Highway 20 from Newport, Oregon to Boston, Massachusetts. We were self supported, and it was a great ride. With a chase vehicle, it would also be a good ride. We were still working at the time, and did not have time for some of the inviting looking side trips. We managed to log close to 3700 miles. We still talk about going back and riding through Nebraska again. I also prefer riding through Yellowstone than driving through it. It is a completely different experience.

Cyclist are not a very common on this route, and people seem more friendly than on some of the established routes. In one small town they sent a "reporter" from the local news paper to interview and take some pictures of us at their city park where we were camped. I really think the reporter was really the paper owner's high school age daughter

Good luck on your venture.

Last edited by Doug64; 04-10-21 at 10:36 AM.
Doug64 is offline  
Old 04-09-21, 08:34 PM
  #22  
a_d_a_m
Senior Member
 
a_d_a_m's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Ohio
Posts: 299

Bikes: 2021 Kona Sutra, Ragley parts-cycle

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 89 Post(s)
Liked 686 Times in 174 Posts
Originally Posted by Radfield View Post
US HWY 20
If you are on 20 east of Cleveland, OH, you will be going right past my house. There are a few stretches that I would recommend bypassing US-20 due to narrow lanes and high traffic/high speeds. (Mostly between Mentor, OH and the PA state line)
a_d_a_m is offline  
Old 04-09-21, 08:42 PM
  #23  
Doug64
Senior Member
 
Doug64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Oregon
Posts: 6,140
Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1031 Post(s)
Liked 432 Times in 256 Posts
Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
Sure can. And what I dislike the most is when you encounter sections with a good number of shorter, steeper climbs back to back to back...Had a some sections like that crossing PA last September. I think my ruling grade was 11.8%. I much prefer longer, more moderately graded climbs. It's nice to be able to get into a rhythm.
This was the 4th hill at the start of the day. I just looked at it, and when I stopped the first time going up, I put on my running shoes and walked. This was in New York. Nothing in the west was near as hard as this. We were getting a little concerned about how many more of these we had to get over. Luckily, that was the last major hill for the rest of the trip. I did some major gearing changes when we got home.

It is actually steeper than it looks


This is an excerpt from our blog of the 2007 Highway 20 trip.

The last of the Pompey Hills. We didn't even pretend to try riding up this one. The picture doesn't really seem as steep as it did in real life. We didn't get to our motel until 7 pm - hot, tired, hungry, and pretty discouraged. The next day we talked to a motorcyclist who said that even they have trouble with this hill. The road followed a Native American trail and had never been re-routed.

Last edited by Doug64; 04-10-21 at 06:50 PM.
Doug64 is offline  
Old 04-10-21, 05:21 AM
  #24  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 8,448

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1966 Perfekt 3 Speed AB Hub, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2337 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 582 Times in 478 Posts
Originally Posted by Doug64 View Post
... when I stopped the first time going up, I put on my running shoes and walked.

.... I did some major gearing changes when we got home.
...
When I built up my Rohloff bike I had to decide what chainring size to buy. I decided that I wanted a cadence of 72 at 3.5 mph for my lowest gear. Calculated what chainring I needed based on that. If I could not maintain 3.5mph while keeping my heart rate in a reasonable level, I would walk instead. Been very happy with that decision.

This hill is in Canada, not where the OP is going. But I decided months before I got there that this hill would be walked, not ridden. No way was I going to pedal all the way up a tall hill at 13 percent grade.



That said, the OP will have his heavier stuff in the RV.
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Old 04-10-21, 06:04 PM
  #25  
Tandem Tom
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 2,295

Bikes: 1992 Serotta Colorado II,Co-Motion Speedster, Giant Escape Hybrid, 1977 Schwinn Super Le Tour

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 337 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 48 Times in 41 Posts
I laugh at hills!! Then I cry!😂😂😂😂
Tandem Tom is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.