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Multi-tool and saddle bag contents…what is really needed?

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Multi-tool and saddle bag contents…what is really needed?

Old 07-19-21, 04:11 AM
  #1  
kosmo886
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Multi-tool and saddle bag contents…what is really needed?

What do people keep in their saddle bags? And what multi-tool functions are worth the weight? Not that I car much about weight. Do spoke wrenches, disc spreads, chain tools really matter? I know more is better to always be prepared, but how many times are chains breaking on the road?

What about co2 vs. pump and/or pump? Just trying to redo my setup. Thinking the following:

Multi-tool - not sure which but looking at Topeak 30 as most full featured
tube - i run tubeless
Tubeless plugs
pump
thinking about co2
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Old 07-19-21, 04:46 AM
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All I carry is a multitool with hex keys and a screwdriver, my ID and some cash. Tubeless has worked so well for me that I don’t carry plugs or even a pump. But I’m not usually more than about 15 miles from home in any one direction.
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Old 07-19-21, 05:04 AM
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I carry with me a Topeak Ratchet DX with the unecessary bits removed; it has a chain tool and I put in a spare quick link (saved my ride once when I had to break and shorten a chain), and also carry a couple of zip ties, a micro pump and typically a "inflate and repair" cartridge, which might be superflouous. I find the ratcheting type of tool is more practical to use than the typical multitool format.

The whole toolkit is pretty light (less than 500 grams with the saddlebag), very compact, and is sufficient to sort out most problems you could possibly run into. Don't carry a tube or levers anymore, tubeless with run flat inserts really takes out the need for that.
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Old 07-19-21, 05:42 AM
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Timely thread, it's been awhile. I'd add a spare shifter cable, cleat bolt and some zip ties.
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Old 07-19-21, 06:25 AM
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Old 07-19-21, 06:29 AM
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Originally Posted by GlennR View Post
That's about all you need right there.
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Old 07-19-21, 06:35 AM
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If your bike is decent condition, there is no reason to carry any tools whatsoever, (aside from tire irons).
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Old 07-19-21, 06:41 AM
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I started carrying a multitool with an integrated chainbreaker several years ago after seeing how time-consuming not having one could be. Within the first month of carrying one I was able to rescue two people's rides ...and, since they were on a group ride with me, I was rescuing my ride as well. That's a nice feeling, and whatever weight it adds to the tool is a small penalty to pay for being The Guy Who Saved Our Ride.

That being said, the chainbreakers that are integrated into my multitools suck as chainbreakers go; I'd much rather use a dedicated chainbreaker to break a chain. So definitely for emergency use only.

One thing I've been doing lately: All my saddlebags have a full-featured multitool in them...but then I throw a simpler multitool that only has 6 or 7 hex keys on it in my jersey pocket, because those are the most common Ugh-I-Need-To-Center-My-Brakes kinda fixes that I typically encounter mid-ride, and it's so much easier to just reach into my pocket than to unzip the saddlebag and try to wrestle the tool out without shredding the tubes or losing the tire levers. You can practically fix stuff while waiting for a traffic light to change, no need to stop the ride and go into Fix-It mode.

Yesterday I needed a Phillips head screwdriver to tighten up a taillight mount, so if I had a tool with 6 or 7 hex keys and a screwdriver that'd be ideal.
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Old 07-19-21, 07:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Bob Ross View Post

Yesterday I needed a Phillips head screwdriver to tighten up a taillight mount, so if I had a tool with 6 or 7 hex keys and a screwdriver that'd be ideal.
Perfect for 99% of use cases is the SKS Tom7, and includes a T25 which is now more prevalent for a number of parts:


A lot of what should be carried depends on what your rides look like. Are you going to remote places where there's no civilization or towns that have bike shops, or areas where there is no cell service? Are you doing point to point rides or doing a loop to return to where you started (in which case you're never further than half your ride distance from where you started or home)? Carry more if these circumstances exist. Carry less if there are other options that in a rare instance could be relied upon (Ubers, bike shop fix, etc).
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Old 07-19-21, 07:50 AM
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Originally Posted by headwind15 View Post
If your bike is decent condition, there is no reason to carry any tools whatsoever, (aside from tire irons).
My bikes are in better than new condition since i maintain them, but you never know. In almost 30,000 miles i've never needed the tool for myself. But I have stopped helped others so the minimal weight is worth the good karma.
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Old 07-19-21, 08:00 AM
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I carry stuff to fix flats (spare tube, levers, CO2 and a tubeless plug kit) and a multi-tool. I've used the multi-tool a few times to help out other people, but never needed it on my own bike. Still, it barely takes up any space in my bag, so why not?
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Old 07-19-21, 10:51 AM
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I carry a 3, 4, 5mm allen wrench. I carry two spare tubes, no patch kit. I carry 1 co2 cartridge with chuck but I also have a Lezyne Mini pump strapped to one of the bottle cages bolts. I normally just pump a flat with the Lezyne has no trouble getting to 95-100 psi which is what I ride although it will take about 200 strokes but not difficult. I would use the CO2 in a hurry or on a ride with someone but I am soloist 99% of the time. CO2 is ok but it can sometimes get out before you get things all in order and I require an endless supply of air to be cautious. They fit in a small saddle bag. If a chain breaks I use my cell phone and I have broken a spoke too. I have not broken a chain yet but that can happen. In some cases you must make the dreaded call for help.
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Old 07-19-21, 12:01 PM
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On a typical ride not too far from home I'll bring just tire levers and a tube, maybe a patch kit, and a pump mounted to the bike or in a rear pocket. If you bring a patch kit, but rarely need it, check that there's still glue in the tube before you leave. It's sad trying to patch a flat, only to squeeze the tube of glue and find that nothing comes out. For a longer ride, I'll add in a small hex set, a small Swiss army knife, and as someone else suggested, a cleat bolt, and a spoke wrench and a chain tool even though I've never needed either one on the road.

I've also started bringing a spoon (wrapped in a plastic bag to keep it clean), so that when I stop for ice cream on the way home, I don't have to throw out yet another disposable utensil.
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Old 07-19-21, 12:08 PM
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Tire/tube servicing tools & materials
Shoe "adjustment" tool & walking cleats
Some greenbacks
Always bring some water.
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Old 07-19-21, 02:29 PM
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Originally Posted by headwind15 View Post
If your bike is decent condition, there is no reason to carry any tools whatsoever, (aside from tire irons).
I'd rather have it in the 0.01% of the time I needed it than to try and save a few ounces in a saddlebag.

I keep the following in my bag:
  • Spare tube
  • Tire levers
  • 2x CO2
  • CO2 head
  • Multi-tool
  • Stick on patch kit (in case the spare tube also meets an untimely end)
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Old 07-19-21, 04:39 PM
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  • Topeak multi-tool with some hex bits and 2 aluminum tire levers (discontinued)
  • Performance Lunar Light inner tube
  • 2 1 g CO2 cartridges
  • 1 CO₂ inflation head
I'm playing with the idea of adding in:
  • 1 oz container of sealant
  • valve core remover
This could speed up roadside puncture (had one on Saturday) repair substantially.
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Old 07-20-21, 01:59 AM
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I use a Lezyne Road Caddy on my carbon fiber bikes, the most cost effective minimalist bag I've found. Hard to beat for the price, and they're durable and easy to strap tightly to the saddle rails with that wide, stout velcro strap. It has just enough room for:
  • A spare tube, usually a Continental Race 28 Light.
  • CO2 kit, with some kind of tiny inflator doodad.
  • Plastic tire lever, don't recall the brand, but it's really tough.
  • Spare quick link.
  • Lezyne patch kit with two or three kinds of self-adhesive patches. I prefer the Lezyne patches but they're hard to find now, so I carry a few from Park and a couple other makers. The Lezyne kit came in a thin plastic envelope smaller than a credit card and nearly as flat. That goes in the slip pocket in the lid of the Road Caddy.
  • Hero Kit multi-tool, the most compact I've found that includes a chain tool, valve wrench, etc. That also goes in the slip pocket in the lid.
  • A Mylar packet of DripDrop electrolyte powder, if I remember.


That bulky Planet Bike CO2 kit has moved to my Serfas wedge bag on the steel road bike.


My steel road bike and hybrid wear Serfas Speed Bag wedge bags. Small on the road bike, medium with expandable pouch on the hybrid. Same stuff as above, with bulkier multi-tool, two regular thickness Conti Race 28 or comparable tubes, two tire levers, snacks, sometimes a USB battery for recharging stuff. Sometimes a few first aid doodads -- aspirin, benadryl, asthma pills, bandaids with coagulation pads. These are for longer casual pace rides.

And always a mini-pump on every bike. Usually Topeak RaceRocket, but also a Blackburn Core Slim, in a water bottle cage mount.

Sometimes I'll bungee-cord a spare folding tire under the saddle for longer rides if I'm expecting rougher terrain or lots of broken glass and construction debris. Very common along some semi-rural places with county line h0nky-tonks and McMansion developments. I've slashed a tire on broken slate that was nearly invisible until I hit it. I don't bother with a spare tire if I'm near town, buses and Uber.

Last edited by canklecat; 07-20-21 at 02:04 AM.
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Old 07-20-21, 02:54 AM
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I carry a Crank Bros M17 multitool with a chain breaker. In the last 4 or so years it's twice saved me from being stranded out in the country 10+ miles from home. First time was when I reused a Shimano chain pin which you aren't supposed to do. It came apart on a ride but luckily I had a spare pin in my saddle bag and fixed it. The second time was when I was riding an '80's Schwinn LeTour I had just restored. The old freewheel locked up for a split second, threw the chain off and it actually ripped my RD right off and twisted the hanger beyond repair. I was able to set it up as a single speed to get home (then had to throw the frame away).

If you carry Co2 this bracket is nice to have. You can find them on amazon.

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Old 07-20-21, 03:58 AM
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Another ‘what do you carry in your saddle bag’ thread lol.
No way a quick search would have answered this old doozy.
BF members do love posting their accessories(with pics)though
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Old 07-20-21, 06:01 AM
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Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
I use a Lezyne Road Caddy on my carbon fiber bikes, the most cost effective minimalist bag I've found. Hard to beat for the price, and they're durable and easy to strap tightly to the saddle rails with that wide, stout velcro strap. It has just enough room for:
  • A spare tube, usually a Continental Race 28 Light.
  • CO2 kit, with some kind of tiny inflator doodad.
  • Plastic tire lever, don't recall the brand, but it's really tough.
  • Spare quick link.
  • Lezyne patch kit with two or three kinds of self-adhesive patches. I prefer the Lezyne patches but they're hard to find now, so I carry a few from Park and a couple other makers. The Lezyne kit came in a thin plastic envelope smaller than a credit card and nearly as flat. That goes in the slip pocket in the lid of the Road Caddy.
  • Hero Kit multi-tool, the most compact I've found that includes a chain tool, valve wrench, etc. That also goes in the slip pocket in the lid.
  • A Mylar packet of DripDrop electrolyte powder, if I remember.


That bulky Planet Bike CO2 kit has moved to my Serfas wedge bag on the steel road bike.


My steel road bike and hybrid wear Serfas Speed Bag wedge bags. Small on the road bike, medium with expandable pouch on the hybrid. Same stuff as above, with bulkier multi-tool, two regular thickness Conti Race 28 or comparable tubes, two tire levers, snacks, sometimes a USB battery for recharging stuff. Sometimes a few first aid doodads -- aspirin, benadryl, asthma pills, bandaids with coagulation pads. These are for longer casual pace rides.

And always a mini-pump on every bike. Usually Topeak RaceRocket, but also a Blackburn Core Slim, in a water bottle cage mount.

Sometimes I'll bungee-cord a spare folding tire under the saddle for longer rides if I'm expecting rougher terrain or lots of broken glass and construction debris. Very common along some semi-rural places with county line h0nky-tonks and McMansion developments. I've slashed a tire on broken slate that was nearly invisible until I hit it. I don't bother with a spare tire if I'm near town, buses and Uber.
Everything is laid out nicely, but I can't correlate your pics with what you're indicating is in the bags.
In the first pic I don't see any CO2 stuff (cartridges nor inflator).
In the 2nd pic I only see 1 tube, and can't see how you'd fit those CO2 cartridges in the bag shown?
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Old 07-20-21, 06:42 AM
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Crank Bros multi tool, CO2 and inflator head. Mini pump. Tire levers. Tube. Cash.
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Old 07-20-21, 07:18 AM
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Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
Lezyne patch kit with two or three kinds of self-adhesive patches. I prefer the Lezyne patches but they're hard to find now, so I carry a few from Park and a couple other makers. The Lezyne kit came in a thin plastic envelope smaller than a credit card and nearly as flat.
fyi Sabino Cycles in Tucson AZ has a crap-ton of those Lezyne patch kits in stock.
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Old 07-20-21, 07:23 AM
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If the question is what is really needed, then it all depends on how accessible the person on the other end of your call of shame is. Or how much you can mooch from someone else on the road.
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Old 07-20-21, 09:55 AM
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I had found a multi tool on the side of the road once and it now resides in a seat pack on one of my bikes . It is heavy and I think it is from Planet Bikes or something. I have only used it once to help someone who had not fully tightened a stem bolt. I mainly use my patch kit and tire levers (all my bikes have frame pumps) because in the rural area where I ride the "goat head" thorns are prolific. I get maybe 3 flats a year while out and about. Mechanical issues are addressed on the stand , but I AM human , so who knows? I had once not properly routed a shift cable for my front derailleur but I was able to get it routed correctly with the slack I had in the cable. I guess I lucked out because it was not the bike that had the multi tool!
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Old 07-20-21, 11:26 AM
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Your question is backwards.

First you determine what situations you are willing to deal with on the road, THEN you decide what you need to take with you to deal with them - and what know-how you may need to acquire.

Many people only want to deal with flat tires and loose bolts/screws. In that case, whatever you need to fix a flat (spare glued tire/spare tube/patch kit/(all that stuff I read about for tubeless - plugs? sealant?)) and to inflate the tire (pump or CO2) - plus maybe a tire lever or two (they're light and small enough that the penalty for carrying them is negligible). And, a basic multi-tool (hex wrenches - not forgetting the all-important 8 mm for crank arm bolts/screw heads/torx wrench/etc.). Many of us are willing to let it go at that, and if something more serious happens then limp home as best we can or call wife/Mommy/Uber for a ride.

If you want to be able to repair a broken/bent chain, then get a multi-tool with a chain breaker (and, learn to use it - on an old chain or on links left over from your last chain replacement) and a quick link (or two - those suckers get lost easily out in the wild).

If you want to repair a broken spoke, then get a multi-tool with spoke wrenches, and carry a couple of spokes - you may need more than one length - and learn how to install and tighten a spoke.

If you want to repair a broken cable, you'll need to carry spares.

And so on. I've heard of people carrying spare derailleur hangers, even. In theory, you could carry tools and spares to fix almost anything, even if you might need a trailer or panniers to schlep it all.

(Oops, forgot the most important: money and/or credit card - though many youngsters keep their payment method on their phones nowadays, or so I've heard.)
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