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Using mountainbike in a road race?

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Using mountainbike in a road race?

Old 09-15-20, 06:19 PM
  #26  
cubewheels
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Originally Posted by aaronmcd View Post
If your fast enough they'll stop laughing.
I hope so. The road bikes I'm looking at are <$400 (new) that can fit >32mm wide tires. At that price, it's non-threat. Just hope, the soft 700x32c tires will keep it in one piece! They usually come with Claris / Sora components, low end stuff. I always shift with the drive train unloaded anyway by "ghost pedaling" and I only weigh 125 lbs, hoping that won't be hard on the low end components!
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Old 09-17-20, 02:29 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
I hope so. The road bikes I'm looking at are <$400 (new) that can fit >32mm wide tires. At that price, it's non-threat. Just hope, the soft 700x32c tires will keep it in one piece! They usually come with Claris / Sora components, low end stuff. I always shift with the drive train unloaded anyway by "ghost pedaling" and I only weigh 125 lbs, hoping that won't be hard on the low end components!
Buy something used that's 5-10 years old instead.

This was pre covid but my roadie cost 350 used with 11 speed 105. Lesser known brand but it's solid.

Used bike prices are high right now, but if you go back a bit and get something with rim brakes and late 10 speed / early 11 speed stuff you should be able to find something for 400-600. I highly recommend going that route instead of buying something new for 400.

Also... you don't need tires that wide for the road. 25-28 is fine.
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Old 09-17-20, 08:42 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post
Buy something used that's 5-10 years old instead.

This was pre covid but my roadie cost 350 used with 11 speed 105. Lesser known brand but it's solid.

Used bike prices are high right now, but if you go back a bit and get something with rim brakes and late 10 speed / early 11 speed stuff you should be able to find something for 400-600. I highly recommend going that route instead of buying something new for 400.

Also... you don't need tires that wide for the road. 25-28 is fine.
I've been looking at those as well but not a lot of options in the used road bikes at the moment. So hard to find used road bikes that I'm starting to look at new ones, even that is hard to come by too. Road bikes are not popular in my place due to very poor quality of roads, everyone uses MTB or hybrid/tour bikes.

I still haven't visited those shops that sell used imported bikes from Japan. They will sometimes have old Raleigh or Bianchi road bikes (alloy or chromoly frame), and if I'm lucky, I might find CX, tour, or even gravel ones. I do need >32mm wide tires based on my own experience and from my roadie friends. The roads here are really bad, even dangerous for skinny wheels (it's a poor, banana republic, no surprises there). I've owned a CX bike a long time ago with 32mm wheels. It's the minimum that I feel safe enough in our very poorly (sometimes, never) maintained roads

I'm currently training with MTB with dropbar mod. It's a cheap Chinese/Wally MTB that uses freewheel and Tourney mechs. I already put 2000 training miles on it, mostly bumpy road hills, some gravel, mud, lots of rain. Surprisingly, it's still solid. But I'm starting to spin out at >24 mph with the limited gearing this is why I train a lot on uphill climbs for sustained power and sprinting without spinning out.

Now I need something faster, anything with higher gearing options so definitely, a bike with freehub and cassette. Instead of upgrading my present MTB, I think it would be better to just get another bike for training and just use the current one purely for errands. I don't mind using entry-level components. I'm only 125 lbs and even cheap Wally-level bikes tolerate my high intensity training without any problems!. I did overhaul the bike the first time I got it, took it apart, cleaned, greased, reassembled, and then regular cleaning and lubing of the drivetrain subsequently. Worked really well for me,
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Old 09-18-20, 06:12 AM
  #29  
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I'd offer to sell you my older cross bike, but I think it would cost more to ship it to you than it's worth.
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Old 09-20-20, 11:13 PM
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Originally Posted by topflightpro View Post
I'd offer to sell you my older cross bike, but I think it would cost more to ship it to you than it's worth.
Yes, I realize the shipping cost alone would be way beyond my budget but thanks for the offer anyway! I found this selling in our country at less than $450 brand new:

https://www.trinx.xyz/bikes/trinx-climber-2-0/

Cyclocross bike with 2x9 Shimano Sora groupset + Sora sti shifters with 700x33c tires on it (and can fit >40mm wide tires). Trinx is a highly trusted brand in this part of the world despite a Chinese company and the quality of their alloy frames are actually very good.

Sounds like a sweet deal to me. I had friends that use Sora groupset in their tour bikes in 100+ mile trips in the mountains and I'm only 125 lbs. I doubt the bike will implode under me even if I sprint at full power. The only minor issue I see with Trinx Climber 2.0 is higher bottom bracket which is not surprising given that CX bikes need more ground clearance for off road riding conditions frankly, I'm not complaining much either with the horrible quality of our roads here, it might be good for safety during training.
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Old 09-21-20, 07:37 AM
  #31  
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Another option (if in stock). LBS website labels it as gravel bike and it already has 40mm wide wheels on it and the frame does look like gravel bike frame, but the groupset is cyclocross/roadbike.

CLIMBER 2.3-CLIMBER-TRINX BIKES

It's the same price as the bike in my previous post, just year 2020 model. The only Con is that the disc brake caliper seem unbranded while the bike in my previous post has Shimano calipers. Weird as they are same price. However, the 2.3 model has slightly deeper rims, better frame design and can fit even wider tires (and already using 40mm wide tires).

Should I get this one instead and just upgrade the brake calipers later? The frame design and able to fit wider tires is a huge plus here and the 50/34 chainring is a very good thing if I'm ever going to use it in a road race.
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Old 09-23-20, 12:59 PM
  #32  
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I just realized that you're in the philipines. Have no idea what the market is like over there but depending on cost of shipping etc, you might be able to put something together.
Otherwise if things like the above are what you have access to then that's that I guess!
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Old 09-24-20, 02:02 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post
I just realized that you're in the philipines. Have no idea what the market is like over there but depending on cost of shipping etc, you might be able to put something together.
Otherwise if things like the above are what you have access to then that's that I guess!
We also have Merida (Specialized), Canyon, Cannondale, Trek, and Giant branded gravel bikes available locally here via LBS.

But they are selling for at least twice my budget limit. Assembly is not an option due to tight budget. I'll run everything stock except for the saddle. I'll swap my ISM TT saddle with the stock saddle and the stock saddle to my current MTB.

We have way more road bikes available because nobody buys them (very prone to pinch flats and dented rims in our very poor quality roads). Everyone here is looking for MTB or gravel bike to cope with the very poor road conditions.
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Old 09-24-20, 09:21 AM
  #34  
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IMHO you're still better off spending money once and getting what you really need. If these cheaper bikes do that and come with reputable parts/wheels then go for it.

Bummer that you can't get anything used. Hell a cross bike with V brakes would probably work for your needs well enough.
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Old 09-24-20, 06:28 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post
IMHO you're still better off spending money once and getting what you really need. If these cheaper bikes do that and come with reputable parts/wheels then go for it.

Bummer that you can't get anything used. Hell a cross bike with V brakes would probably work for your needs well enough.
Yeah, cross and gravel bikes are in huge demand atm. The worst part is supply is virtually non-existent (I have to be really lucky to get one at this time), save for the >$1000 bikes.

I can still wait for next year for the market situation to improve and hopefully, more CX and gravel models to choose from. The ones I posted are the only good ones available in that price range.

There are $500 models I'm also looking at with brand name "Traction". Slightly more expensive. Similar drivetrain (Sora) but with better disc brake calipers and thru-axle which sounds really good. Only problem is the endurance/touring geometry and puts you in a MTB riding position. It almost looks like a 29er MTB with dropbar and sadly, prices have gone up. Same model now selling at around $600 if it's ever in stock at the LBS.

Should have went for these bikes when I bought a bike last May. Bike supply was still very good last May. But then I have totally no idea that gravel bikes existed and that fork suspension is more of a problem in my riding style that I have eventually grown accustomed to.

I do love V-brakes, even caliper brakes rim brakes. IMO they still have stronger bite than mechanical disc brakes but then I never tried them on long downhills yet where you need brake for long periods to avoid overspeeding.

Last edited by cubewheels; 09-24-20 at 06:31 PM.
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Old 09-25-20, 07:02 AM
  #36  
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I think mechanical discs are better than rim brakes in terms of braking performance but modulation is much harder AFAIK. Obviously depends on the quality.

Heck, if you're feeling spry, you could always take an MTB, put drop bars on it, and use bar end shifters.

Do you think you'd even really be racing this year? Can always go with the above as you seem to have wanted to do earlier and then get a better bike down the line. Atleast you'd still be able to convert back to an MTB if you needed one.

You have some options but all are compromises unless you want to shell out for the merida/giant bike etc.
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Old 09-25-20, 07:36 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post
Heck, if you're feeling spry, you could always take an MTB, put drop bars on it, and use bar end shifters.

Do you think you'd even really be racing this year? Can always go with the above as you seem to have wanted to do earlier and then get a better bike down the line. Atleast you'd still be able to convert back to an MTB if you needed one.
I don't think I'll be racing this year. I'll probably hold off purchase until next year. Someone told me that our Customs is making it much harder for bikes to get in the country to try to make money with it.

And I still have a lot of training to do. I do plan on continuing training with the gravel bike once I have one. I've already hit a wall in training in the flats with the MTB due to MTB gearing which doesn't allow me to hit full speeds in the flats during sprints, etc because I'm starting to spin out at about 30 mph. I already use dropbar (Soma Gator style gravel dropbar) on the MTB which is only useful for training in the position in the drops (in and out of the saddle). I train with the stock knobby tires, didn't bother to put hybrid road tires because the gearing will not allow me to hit full speeds anyway.

I compensate for it by training a lot on hills. but once I get the gravel or CX bike, I can finally train at full speed in the flats. I really like the geometry of the Trinx Climber 2.3 which is more attuned to racing than touring as you can set the bars really low. All I need there is simply replace the knobby tires with slick tires for racing. 32c slick tires will do.

I really can't train with anything less than 32mm wide wheels. The roads here are so bad, at 30 mph, I even feel like I need suspension fork for peace of mind!

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Old 10-27-20, 06:44 PM
  #38  
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My first reaction is no, do not do this, but you have a unique situation. However, if you do, the absolute first thing you need to do is to make you bike more aerodynamic. MTB bikes (I have owned many, I have an off road background) are TERRIBLE in terms of aero, especially with the ridiculously wide handlebars. You already noted this fact. Converting to drop bars is a huge hassle, it would be easier to just buy a bike designed for drop bars, which I believe is your ultimate plan (a gravel bike) but....in the meantime, cut those bars down as much as you can, take a full 3 inches off each side or more if you can.

Another little trick is to grab the bars right next to the gooseneck, drop your elbows down so that they are parallel to your top tube. Doing so will put you in a position similar to someone on a tri bike. Except you will be heavier. And slower. But you will be in the best position possible for a bike that is not designed to prioritize aerodynamics.

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Old 10-28-20, 06:26 AM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by RadDog View Post
My first reaction is no, do not do this, but you have a unique situation. However, if you do, the absolute first thing you need to do is to make you bike more aerodynamic. MTB bikes (I have owned many, I have an off road background) are TERRIBLE in terms of aero, especially with the ridiculously wide handlebars. You already noted this fact. Converting to drop bars is a huge hassle, it would be easier to just buy a bike designed for drop bars, which I believe is your ultimate plan (a gravel bike) but....in the meantime, cut those bars down as much as you can, take a full 3 inches off each side or more if you can.

Another little trick is to grab the bars right next to the gooseneck, drop your elbows down so that they are parallel to your top tube. Doing so will put you in a position similar to someone on a tri bike. Except you will be heavier. And slower. But you will be in the best position possible for a bike that is not designed to prioritize aerodynamics.
You're right going straight to bike that uses drop bar. Fortunately, I was able to spot a gravel bike that fit my measly budget of $400 and immediately bought it! It's actually $250 brand new, pre-Covid price for that bike model. Hard to pass on that one.

It's heavy which is not surprising for the cost. The fork is steel. Even the wheel is heavy with the steel spokes and steel hub. Empty weight is 28 lbs without accessories. Surprisingly, it's got 2x9 gear and the Chinese STI shifted very smoothly and quickly after I fixed the bent hanger and tuned indexing. The FD is dropping the chain though which I fixed with a cheap Tourney FD from another bike. The bike uses free wheel (NOT freehub) which is again, not surprising for the cost. But the 9 speed freewheel has cogs that looks exactly like the ones in free hub cassette and shifted almost as smooth as legit Shimano Sora 9 speed cassette + Sora RD.

After tuning, overhauling some components, tightening the bolts, and lots of testing, the bike is now pretty solid and smooth that I actually feel confident enough to race it. I don't have the budget yet to upgrade some components like the fork and hubs to reduce weight. I

But when the time comes to upgrade the bike components to reduce weight, it won't be fancy and I'll keep total upgrade cost under $200, mostly components from China. For now, I have ordered a longer stem with -35 degree angle to slam the dropbar further down to improve aerodynamics. Being a gravel bike, the geometry is more upright so the replacement stem should get the dropbar real low.

I'm still able to get quite aero on this bike by resting my elbows above the hoods horizontally like in TT position. For now, I'll employ the 28 lbs gravel bike for training. Maybe, eventually I'll get strong enough to even race with it! It's very solid, no unusual noises even if doing 25 mph over cobblestone quality pavement. Sadly, we still don't have any races yet, not even in the local clubs. I only get random street races which is not as fun as the real race.

Anyway, I camouflaged the bike to look rusty and just blend in (turn invisible) to help avoid theft in the public rack I use to buy groceries. The rack is right beside trees and bushes so the coloring blends in perfectly with the foliage. I use the bike for everything. Commuting, errands / utility, and training. I wasn't able to install front rack on the bike (no eyelets, nowhere to put screws) so when the back is loaded with 40 lbs of grocery, I pedal the bike home entirely out of the saddle to offload the rear wheel. Currently uses 28mm wide wheels which I didn't have any problems at all with our poor quality roads so if I race eventually, I'm going with 28mm wide wheels. Narrow enough to be aero and wide enough to soak up our bad roads. I'm quite comfortable pedaling out of the saddle and I just do it for long periods to deal with our bad roads.


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Old 10-28-20, 10:41 AM
  #40  
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nagsasanay ka ba Arnis? I spent 2 years in the Inosanto system. My wife was born in Manila.
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Old 10-28-20, 07:56 PM
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Originally Posted by RadDog View Post
nagsasanay ka ba Arnis? I spent 2 years in the Inosanto system. My wife was born in Manila.
2 years, that's incredible! What made me remind you of martial arts? Hindi ko naisip mag aral ng Arnis. I've been interested but never had the time. Nobody learns the art anymore, only few though I think I can be good at it.

That's so cool your wife is born here. The place is like one giant 'hood. The streets of Manila is the only place I train. Difficult to keep the pace, need to stand a lot and grind.
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