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Riding on 40-55mph Road?

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Riding on 40-55mph Road?

Old 11-09-21, 12:26 AM
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CruizingB
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Riding on 40-55mph Road?

I live in the Coachella Valley and the average speed limit here is 40MPH. There are streets that have bike lanes but some of them are pretty thin. I hate using the sidewalks because they arenít wide enough for both me and pedestrians. I plan on using Google maps for more safer routes, but I still need to go into traffic. Any thoughts on this or advice?
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Old 11-09-21, 03:17 AM
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Light and more lights. Reflective vest. Reflective helmet. Reflective pedals. Also it sucks lmao.
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Old 11-09-21, 04:34 AM
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Situational Awareness

Maintain situational awareness at all times. Thatís a big wrapper on lots of details that you will learn on your own.

Learn the common risk situations. There are lots of resources like https://bicyclesafe.com/.

Some of the details I use on similar stroads:

A mirror is a huge help in keeping track of whatís developing behind me.

I avoid packs of cars. I use traffic lights to my advantage; often I can fall in behind the platoon leaving an intersection and I will have open road to the next light.

Iím actively visible. As previously mentioned, lights and eye-catching garb. I use lights front and rear during the day. I ďtake the laneĒ when necessary to improve my conspicuity and make it easy for them to pass me safely when I can. I move my head and wave to indicate to motorists that I see them.

I learn from my close calls. Before I go to sleep I review my journey in my head and think about what could have happened and what I can do differently to reduce my risk.

There are hundreds of little details and practices that you will develop for your journeys to both reduce your risk and improve your enjoyment. It beats the daylights out of driving.
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Old 11-09-21, 08:44 AM
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Originally Posted by hose View Post
Light and more lights. Reflective vest. Reflective helmet. Reflective pedals. Also it sucks lmao.
Yup, I used to commute in an area that had some bike lanes and lots of fast roads... the slowest speed limits were 35MPH, but these were along car parked lined streets, so I took the lane in those areas. Most of the speed limits were in the 45-55 MPH zone, and there were BL in most of those areas (those BL have actually been enlarged with buffer zones... but long after I left the area). I even rode on the 65MPH Interstate, along the shoulder, until I was at either at on or off ramps... and then, I took the lane.

I dressed in bright clothing, of various colors, had a steady bright tail light along with high and low blinkers and a steady strong headlight. I basically went with the "alien mothership" lighting model, and distracting clothing... including some small bright "rags" that hung from my panniers. This was my daily commute. My mentality was try to be seen, but act as if motorists likely did not see me. I signaled, I waved, I yelled and I used a horn. I did all that I could to make other road users aware of me, and then I rode how I wanted to, in as safe a manner as the road design would allow.

I did not ride sidewalks. But I took advantage of lanes, paths and shortcuts where available. And at all times... I WATCHED THE OTHER TRAFFIC. I also had a darn good mirror.

Now, in my mid '60s, I doubt I could ride that alert and aware and react as quickly as I did for those 35+ years of bike commuting. YMMV.
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Old 11-09-21, 09:28 AM
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Pretty hard to give you any realistic advice on whether you should or should not ride that road.

You just need to judge for yourself if you think it's safe for you. I've ridden roads that have 60 mph speed limit and felt perfectly safe. No bike lane either. On the other end of that, there are plenty of roads with 35 mph speed limits that I wouldn't go near on a bike.
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Old 11-09-21, 10:13 AM
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Agree with Iride01 . Bike lanes and shoulders are hard to judge with a simple description of "thin". Also, different sight lines and traffic patterns play roles.

If you haven't already, signing up for Strava and getting access to their heat maps can help a lot. That way you'll see the routes that other cyclists have worked out.
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Old 11-09-21, 10:32 AM
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Originally Posted by MinnMan View Post
... signing up for Strava and getting access to their heat maps can help a lot. That way you'll see the routes that other cyclists have worked out.

Or RideWithGPS and many others. GarminConnect use to do this very well a long time ago then it disappeared. I think they do it again now, but I don't go there very often.

I have used heat maps to get ideas about where others ride when I go to visit other areas. If that many people ride a particular route, then you'd think the regular motor traffic will be somewhat use to cyclist being there. Though for certain at any moment you never know if you are going to meet that one motorist that isn't paying attention. Or even another cyclist not paying attention.
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Old 11-09-21, 11:18 AM
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never be where drivers would not expect you to be. and remember that at least half of all drivers are below average. and, if you're over the age of 12, don't ride on the sidewalk.
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Old 11-10-21, 08:39 AM
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You’ll find a lot of opinions here – just be careful of absolutes such as those saying “never ride on sidewalks”. We’re all in different environments and some folks have trouble envisioning situations where it may be prudent. Use your judgement – and realize sidewalks have their own set of dangers, particularly at driveways, side streets, and parking lot exits.

Make yourself visible – not just with bright colors and lights but also with lane positioning when in curves or near parked vehicles as you approach cross streets / parking lot exits or similar situations. I use flashing front & rear lights even in day time. I also am extremely cautious if it’s late afternoon and in line with the sun – folks with dirty windshield have a tough time seeing other cars let alone a bicyclist

A mirror – whether bar end or helmet mounted – can help a lot with your situational awareness. Same for not using headphones.

Signal your intentions – and don’t be afraid to take the lane when appropriate.

See if you can find riding groups – facebook groups can be helpful – and many LBS have regular group rides as well. Not only can it be fun – but you’ll also learn of good local routes you can ride whenever you wish.
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Old 11-10-21, 03:03 PM
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I have several "high speed" roads that i hit. I ride as far as possible to the right, on shoulders, etc. And, pay lot of attention to driveways and intersections. But, high speeds are part of life.

If possible, keep hunting for less busy roads, even if high speed.

Originally Posted by flangehead View Post
I avoid packs of cars.
I can't avoid all packs of cars. But that brings up a point. If you get passed by one car, continue holding the line until you are certain there aren't 2 or 3 cars bunched up.
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Old 11-10-21, 04:26 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
Ö.
I can't avoid all packs of cars. But that brings up a point. If you get passed by one car, continue holding the line until you are certain there aren't 2 or 3 cars bunched up.
I agree completely that packs of cars canít be avoided entirely.

However I find I can time my moves to minimize my exposure to packs. This is particularly true on a commuting route where I have experience with traffic light durations and traffic patterns.
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Old 11-10-21, 05:20 PM
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Originally Posted by flangehead View Post
I agree completely that packs of cars canít be avoided entirely.

However I find I can time my moves to minimize my exposure to packs. This is particularly true on a commuting route where I have experience with traffic light durations and traffic patterns.
Most of the 50+ MPH roads I'm on have very few traffic lights. Cars come when they come.

There is one stretch of road that I avoid at any time near rush hour traffic (easier to do on long summer days than short winter days).
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Old 11-10-21, 06:42 PM
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Here in Vermont, the speed limit on two lane roads, outside of towns is usually 50 MPH. Traffic is often much faster, and includes private cars and commercial trucks up to and including semis, plus the odd tractor. It doesn't feel very risky, and there are very few reports in the papers of cyclists being hit. I don't review the papers religiously, but I think I would notice such stories.
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Old 11-11-21, 09:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Pratt View Post
Here in Vermont, the speed limit on two lane roads, outside of towns is usually 50 MPH. Traffic is often much faster, and includes private cars and commercial trucks up to and including semis, plus the odd tractor. It doesn't feel very risky, and there are very few reports in the papers of cyclists being hit. I don't review the papers religiously, but I think I would notice such stories.
As I mentioned earlier... YMMV... on the farm two lane roads east of San Diego, 50MPH is quite common, but then so are wide shoulders, and scant traffic.

In town, 50MPH boulevards 3 and 4 lanes wide, each way exist, and the traffic is quite heavy, BL help, but it is a chaotic mess, with cars merging all over the place... and drivers just don't seem to "see" cyclists...

There is a vast difference between a two lane road, and a wide multi-lane road. The biggest difference is that one slower motorist can "hold back" following traffic on the two lane road... not so on the multi-lane road where motorists treat it as a "Le Mans raceway."
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Old 11-11-21, 02:40 PM
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Originally Posted by CruizingB View Post
I live in the Coachella Valley and the average speed limit here is 40MPH. There are streets that have bike lanes but some of them are pretty thin. I hate using the sidewalks because they arenít wide enough for both me and pedestrians. I plan on using Google maps for more safer routes, but I still need to go into traffic. Any thoughts on this or advice?
Most of the US is two lane roads with speed limits of 55-70mph. People ride these roads tens of millions of miles each year without incident. Make yourself visible, control the lane, maintain awareness of your surroundings, and enjoy the ride. Stay off sidewalks and only use bike lanes when absolutely necessary - they add risks of their own.
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Old 11-11-21, 03:29 PM
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Originally Posted by bbbean View Post
Most of the US is two lane roads with speed limits of 55-70mph. People ride these roads tens of millions of miles each year without incident. Make yourself visible, control the lane, maintain awareness of your surroundings, and enjoy the ride. Stay off sidewalks and only use bike lanes when absolutely necessary - they add risks of their own.

That first sentence is crazy talk.

Where the hell do you ride or drive that you see 70 mph two lane roads?

I have NEVER seen a bicyclist "control the lane" on a 55 mph road, and I ride and drive on a lot of 55 mph roads. Every bicyclist I see on such roads is on the shoulder or truly FRAP.
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Old 11-11-21, 03:52 PM
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
That first sentence is crazy talk.

Where the hell do you ride or drive that you see 70 mph two lane roads?
Google found this handy chart: https://driving-tests.org/road-signs/speed-limit-sign/

In my home state, rural roads are typically 55-65 mph.

Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
I have NEVER seen a bicyclist "control the lane" on a 55 mph road, and I ride and drive on a lot of 55 mph roads. Every bicyclist I see on such roads is on the shoulder or truly FRAP.
You should get out more. You're welcome to ride with me in rural MO, TN, AR, IL, and the dozen or so other states I visit and ride. When I control the lane, cars move over and pass. When I right FRAP, I get close passes at 75 mph. I see lots of other riders doing the same.
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Old 11-11-21, 03:58 PM
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Originally Posted by bbbean View Post
Google found this handy chart: https://driving-tests.org/road-signs/speed-limit-sign/

In my home state, rural roads are typically 55-65 mph.



You should get out more. You're welcome to ride with me in rural MO, TN, AR, IL, and the dozen or so other states I visit and ride. When I control the lane, cars move over and pass. When I right FRAP, I get close passes at 75 mph. I see lots of other riders doing the same.

Yup, we drive in different parts of the country, I've never ridden in any of those states. If I tried that here on a 55 mph road, I think I'd be road kill real quick. Like I said, no one around here does it, and I ride all over New England. I won't list the 7 or so other states I've ridden in, but I've never seen it there either.
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Old 11-11-21, 08:32 PM
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Originally Posted by bbbean View Post
Most of the US is two lane roads with speed limits of 55-70mph. People ride these roads tens of millions of miles each year without incident. Make yourself visible, control the lane, maintain awareness of your surroundings, and enjoy the ride. Stay off sidewalks and only use bike lanes when absolutely necessary - they add risks of their own.
You don't control the lane. You assume lane position in hopes of influencing driver behavior.

Sidewalks can be very useful in some cases for avoiding dangerous areas or conditions.

Not all bike lanes are created equally. Some are great..far better than the main lane alternative. Others are pretty bad.
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Old 11-13-21, 05:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Paul Barnard View Post
You don't control the lane. You assume lane position in hopes of influencing driver behavior.

Sidewalks can be very useful in some cases for avoiding dangerous areas or conditions.

Not all bike lanes are created equally. Some are great..far better than the main lane alternative. Others are pretty bad.

Also true of roads. If there's curves, riding the center of a two-lane 50 mph or more road may be absolutely suicidal as the vehicles coming around the curve are very likely to overtake you before they know you're there. You can't influence the driver's behavior if they don't know you're there. I'm in New England, there aren't a lot of straight two lane roads outside of town.
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Old 11-13-21, 07:30 AM
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what would be better is 30-40 mph rds if you can find them. bike sharrows a bonus

avoid roads like this






speed limit here is 30mph, I was well over that & still got passed at a high speed



use mirrors & if you hear a big motor coming from behind & oncoming traffic on the other side, take a look in the mirror. don't be afraid to pull over & let whatever it is pass you. up here in the Boston area, what kills urban bikers is trucks making turns at complicated intersections, at slow speeds. don't get squished

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Old 11-13-21, 08:28 AM
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Rural roads here are often two lanes and 55 MPH. I try to avoid those if at all possible. Most of the roads closer to towns are still two lane and 40-45 MPH or so. Many of those roads are narrow, and either have no shoulder, or an 18" or so wide shoulder, often with rumble strips to alert drivers that they are about to end up in the ditch alongside the road. Those rumble strips make it impractical to ride to the right of the white line, unless you're training for the cobbles of Paris-Roubaix. And, even where there are no rumble strips, I still wouldn't ride there, because it only encourages close passes.
Add to that the recent explosion of building in the area, and the resulting exponential increase in vehicle traffic. When I first moved here, the roads I rode regularly were between fields of grazing cows or peach orchards, with the occasional farm tractor. Now, those roads are lined with housing developments and 100+ unit apartment buildings, but the roads themselves haven't been 'upgraded' to handle the extra traffic.
I ride with a helmet mirror, Varia radar, a blinking headlight, two blinking tail lights (one on my helmet, one on my seat post) and two GoPro cameras (forward and rear facing.) I seldom ride alone anymore, because I believe a group of riders is more visible than a solo rider, and there is some safety in numbers.
All you can do is to make yourself as visible as possible, stay alert and aware of traffic around you, and try to never allow yourself to get into a position where you don't have an escape route if needed.
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Old 11-13-21, 09:04 AM
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60 mph. Dinotte Tail Lights

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Old 11-13-21, 09:07 AM
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65 mph.
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Old 11-13-21, 01:53 PM
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Originally Posted by 10 Wheels View Post
60 mph. Dinotte Tail Lights
Is that a marked bike lane going down the middle of what looks like a freeway? How miserable!!!

It reminds me of this clip of Russian cyclists from a couple of years back.

Cyclists were lane spliting. And, a truck went straight from a turn-only lane.
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