Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Small country road

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Small country road

Old 11-28-22, 04:02 PM
  #26  
mev
bicycle tourist
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Austin, Texas, USA
Posts: 2,027

Bikes: Trek 520, Lightfoot Ranger, Trek 4500

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 340 Post(s)
Liked 128 Times in 96 Posts
Originally Posted by denis_987 View Post
I have read the warning for Mexico from the Canadian government.... I will be 4 to 5 days in Tamaulipas, so I will stick to national roads and ride only during day and will stay in hotels for those nights.


For what it is worth, in addition to reading travel warnings from my own government (US), I also have found the UK Foreign Office to have a useful travel advice including useful overview maps color coded red/yellow/blue. Here for example is their Mexico page: https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/mexico

Here is what the UK says about Canada - https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/canada (the section on terrorism is more than I would have written). Here is what the UK says about the USA - https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-ad...y-and-security - with a special mention of the Orlando airport .

Otherwise following some of the national roads and being careful with where you are at night seems like a reasonable plan. Before I went on my trip, I read most every blog/book I could of people who had crossed Latin America and also took note of where there had been issues. I didn't have any problems in my riding and most other cyclists had similar experiences. In the few cases there were problems were more spread out (except for northern Peru) and sometimes being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Being on a national road can be a bit noisy but is otherwise well traveled.
mev is offline  
Likes For mev:
Old 11-29-22, 09:00 AM
  #27  
denis_987
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by mev View Post

For what it is worth, in addition to reading travel warnings from my own government (US), I also have found the UK Foreign Office to have a useful travel advice including useful overview maps color coded red/yellow/blue. Here for example is their Mexico page: https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/mexico

Here is what the UK says about Canada - https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/canada (the section on terrorism is more than I would have written). Here is what the UK says about the USA - https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-ad...y-and-security - with a special mention of the Orlando airport .
The information on the UK site seems very complete...and even a little too alarmist. If I put what UK mentions of Canada vs Mexico into perspective, I think just common sense on safety will be the best approach.

Am I too optimistic?
denis_987 is offline  
Old 11-29-22, 10:17 AM
  #28  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 12,586
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2490 Post(s)
Liked 780 Times in 650 Posts
Originally Posted by mev View Post
Otherwise following some of the national roads and being careful with where you are at night seems like a reasonable plan. Before I went on my trip, I read most every blog/book I could of people who had crossed Latin America and also took note of where there had been issues. I didn't have any problems in my riding and most other cyclists had similar experiences. In the few cases there were problems were more spread out (except for northern Peru) and sometimes being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Being on a national road can be a bit noisy but is otherwise well traveled.
Denis, have you done some research on the areas you plan to go? You are leaving soon, so I hope you have looked at some blog or trip journals of others who have biked in that part of Mexico.
You will have easily found Cancun reports, but have you had any luck with the coastal area down from the border, have others ridden there and what sort of impressions have you gotten?

Those of us here with travel experience in Mexico can give you good general tips, but it would be good if you can find actual trip reports in those states. Trip blogs can at least give you a heads up of some aspects of things, although do be aware that opinions of danger or sketchy situations can vary quite a bit from person to person, and of course situations can change with time.

One example of changing situations- somewhere north of Oaxaca where I was riding through, a specific town was mentioned in a trip journal. The couple were there not long after a violent police/civilian interaction with protestors burning vehicles in the road and resulting in a number of shooting deaths of demonstrators. The couple clearly said the atmosphere was very tense and everything seemed dangerous. When I was there in the same town, maybe 6 months later (I forget how long exactly) the burnt out cars, buses and trucks were still in the road (apparently the police did not want to risk moving them) but I found the town to be very friendly. I even chatted with some policemen and policewomen on a street and they were relaxed and friendly. Regular people were just plain friendly and helpful, in fact we spent two days there because of a very cold snap that was happening, and chance of rain, so I didnt feel like riding in under 10c weather and wet.

So in this case, if I had believed the place was super dangerous, I would have avoided the town, but in the end, it was fine----timing I guess.

It cannot be stressed more about how a "wrong place, wrong time" thing could happen. There are no guarantees in life, but it is super important to sense a vibe in a place, from observing people etc, BUT, and a big BUT--depending on one persons experience and perception of a situation, one person could find a place threatening , especially if new to a culture, not knowing the language, or their personal traveling experiences outside of their culture and society.

I hope that you have read up on as much as you can about bicycle touring in Mexico, just so it helps you be prepared and adapt to a different reality than perhaps you have only seen in "tourist" places in Mexico.
djb is offline  
Likes For djb:
Old 11-29-22, 12:25 PM
  #29  
phughes
Senior Member
 
phughes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 2,690
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 859 Post(s)
Liked 975 Times in 569 Posts
Originally Posted by denis_987 View Post
A day when I learned something is not a wasted day...What should I have used instead?
Quite honestly there is nothing wrong with the term, country road. Growing up in the US Midwest, it is a term I heard and used often.
phughes is offline  
Old 11-29-22, 12:33 PM
  #30  
denis_987
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by John N View Post
If you want a cool and very relaxed crossing into Mexico, cross here: https://goo.gl/maps/an1tv8rwV2chKHaw7 . It is a hand-pulled ferry crossing with very little traffic and a small border town so now issues. You can mostly take county roads to get there. Be sure to get your long-term visitor card and you may have to ask for it since they assume most people crossing there are going to stay withing the border exclusion area. Once in Mexico, I would stick to toll roads over the free road. I would personally avoid "two track" types of roads when possible, just because they are slower, sandier, and are typically near less services. Of course, if riding on one to avoid a major congested area then fine. Have a great trip!
What do you think is the best point of entry: Anzalduas International Bridge or McAllen-Hidalgo-Reynosa International Bridge? Both of them are "mid-size". I have no information about pedestrian on the Anzalduas bridge but I know that pedestrians are allowed on the Hildalgo bridge
denis_987 is offline  
Old 11-29-22, 06:10 PM
  #31  
John N
Full Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 404

Bikes: Co-Motion Americano Pinion P18; Co-Motion Americano Rohloff (stolen), Thorn Nomad MkII, Robert Beckman Skakkit (FOR SALE), Santana Tandem, ICE Adventure FS

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 145 Post(s)
Liked 54 Times in 42 Posts
[QUOTE=denis_987;22724394]What do you think is the best point of entry: Anzalduas International Bridge or McAllen-Hidalgo-Reynosa International Bridge? Both of them are "mid-size". I have no information about pedestrian on the Anzalduas bridge but I know that pedestrians are allowed on the Hildalgo bridge[/QUOTE]

I have no experience with either bridge but if I were to chose between those two, I would use the Anzalduas International Bridge (AIB) because it skirts Reynosa. Border towns are a pain at times to get through as people are trying to get your attention to sell you stuff, you are unfamiliar with the new country/customs/etc. That is why I would use the AIB in order to skirt the city. That said, I would still ride the extra 15 miles out of the way to do the crossing I mentioned originally. No hassles and I figure a hand-pulled ferry will not be around forever in the USA so it is a unique experience. Hope you have a great trip!
John N is offline  
Old 11-29-22, 06:47 PM
  #32  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 12,586
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2490 Post(s)
Liked 780 Times in 650 Posts
Denis, my understanding is that getting into Mexico from the US side is fairly easy and straightforward. Like John mentioned, just be aware that there probably will be the usual crowd of people past the border trying to get your attention to exchange money, buy stuff etc, so just be extra careful with your stuff.

this does touch on the whole traveling on your own thing, its harder to keep an eye on your bike and belongings when its just you, so as a general message, be extra careful of not leaving your bike alone-at stores, border situations, carrying things up stairs etc.
Oh, nearly all motels, hotels are ok with you bringing your bike into the room with you, not all, so just be prepared to make a judgement call on if you feel ok leaving it in a given spot if the owners really insist on you storing it somewhere else overnight. I always have a coil lock to at least attach it to something, or through the wheels, but really, every situation is different.

were you thinking of bringing just rear panniers?
I would suggest bringing your sleeping bag, it can be very handy if its a cold room, or even if the sheets are kind of sketchy. I took mine even on the trip that I didnt take my tent, and used it in hotels often. Its a summer bag, so not overly bulky nor heavy.

your bike is already in Texas, but I hope that it is in very good mechanical condition and the tires in good shape. Bicycle shops are common, but you should start with very good tires that are rather new. Also, bring at least a couple of spare tubes, patches, glue (more than one tube of glue).
djb is offline  
Old 11-29-22, 07:56 PM
  #33  
denis_987
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
After checking for the Los Ebanos ferry option, I is very tempting to go by the ferry!

There is a Youtube video (
) that shows it. Seem to me at lot more quiet than any other entry point...and it is only 2$ as per in the video and also only 37 Km extra. It crossed a small town on the mexican side and not the crowded city of Reynosa.

The only thing that bother me is the fence on street view just before US customs in the middle of the road ( https://www.google.com/maps/@26.2400...!7i3328!8i1664). Will see by myself when I get there.

denis_987 is offline  
Old 11-29-22, 08:11 PM
  #34  
denis_987
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by djb View Post
were you thinking of bringing just rear panniers?
I would suggest bringing your sleeping bag, it can be very handy if its a cold room, or even if the sheets are kind of sketchy. I took mine even on the trip that I didnt take my tent, and used it in hotels often. Its a summer bag, so not overly bulky nor heavy.

your bike is already in Texas, but I hope that it is in very good mechanical condition and the tires in good shape. Bicycle shops are common, but you should start with very good tires that are rather new. Also, bring at least a couple of spare tubes, patches, glue (more than one tube of glue).
Rear pannier for sure, and front panniers depending if I bring camping stuff or not (still not decided ). Will bring my sleeping bag (pack very small) and a sleeping bag liner just in case.
My bike is in excellent condition (at the departure time to Texas! Will see for any damage that mat have occurred during its transport but my brother in law says it looks ok.
Good tires indeed: brand new Schwalbe Marathon Plus. And I always have spare tubes, and patches kit (three kits I think -better be safe than sorry!!!)
denis_987 is offline  
Old 11-29-22, 09:13 PM
  #35  
axolotl
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,952
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 250 Post(s)
Liked 75 Times in 57 Posts
I hope that you'll be able to take some time to visit some interesting places you'll be near. I looked at your planned route, and you'll be in or very close to some places I've visited and enjoyed. Just outside of Papantla in Veracruz state, there is an impressive archeological site called El Tajin.




South of the city of Veracruz (which is nice. Make sure you walk around in the evening to see all of the street musicians and people dancing), there's a small town called Tlacotalpan, a UNESCO World Heritage site.



Further south and east is the Laguna de Catemaco, a large freshwater lake near the sea. There is a large nature preserve on the east side of the lake and there are boats to it from the town of Catemaco. The boats go right past an island where Asian macaque monkeys were introduced, which are easy to see. There are also native spider monkeys.

I haven't been to Tabasco state but there are supposedly some impressive Olmec sites there.

I doubt you'll have cool temperatures except possibly the first few nights near southern Texas. You'll be at low elevations and heat will be a bigger problem than cold. I had some very cold temperatures in January in Zacatecas, but that's high in the mountains.(2460m 8,000 feet). It was warm both times I was in lowland Veracruz state in January/February.
axolotl is online now  
Old 11-30-22, 01:33 AM
  #36  
str
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Universe Spain
Posts: 840
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 192 Post(s)
Liked 329 Times in 143 Posts
Originally Posted by denis_987 View Post
I am planning a trip to Mexico up to Cancun with Ride With GPS. I know that it is more preferable to use small country road with no traffic but RWG put me on very tiny road very small dirt roads so small that they look like tractors path (if I do Street View)! Is it safe to ride on those road; I mean is it reliable to use them?

On a different note, do bikes are allow on toll road in Mexico? I dont plan on using them all the way, but sometimes, they save a lot of mileage and allow to skip very small villages or steep slopes.
Using small roads and gravel roads to me is the essence of bike touring, be alone on the road and enjoy nature. Why shouldn't it be safe?
str is offline  
Old 11-30-22, 01:39 AM
  #37  
str
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Universe Spain
Posts: 840
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 192 Post(s)
Liked 329 Times in 143 Posts
Originally Posted by denis_987 View Post
This is my planned route: https://ridewithgps.com/routes/41481974 Any advices are welcome
Went with street view to see your route. see a lot of tarmac and big wide roads (not all of them). are you sure you want to join motorised traffic?
str is offline  
Old 11-30-22, 07:39 AM
  #38  
denis_987
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by axolotl View Post
I hope that you'll be able to take some time to visit some interesting places you'll be near. I looked at your planned route, and you'll be in or very close to some places I've visited and enjoyed. Just outside of Papantla in Veracruz state, there is an impressive archeological site called El Tajin.
Thank you for your suggestions...
denis_987 is offline  
Old 11-30-22, 07:52 AM
  #39  
denis_987
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by str View Post
Went with street view to see your route. see a lot of tarmac and big wide roads (not all of them). are you sure you want to join motorised traffic?
Originally Posted by str View Post
Using small roads and gravel roads to me is the essence of bike touring, be alone on the road and enjoy nature. Why shouldn't it be safe?
Usually, I always take small roads but this time, it is Mexico, and several government mention the danger of being there. And those small isolated roads seem a bit risky for my security (at least in Tamaulipas state)
Currently, I have two overlapping routes planned. So I can choose according to the feeling of the road. Also, I don't want to get stuck in the middle of the night in the middle of nowhere If I'm deciding not to bring my camping gear. (still not decided yet!). All my gear are in Texas right now waiting for me, so I have exactly one week to decide!
denis_987 is offline  
Old 11-30-22, 08:42 AM
  #40  
str
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Universe Spain
Posts: 840
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 192 Post(s)
Liked 329 Times in 143 Posts
Originally Posted by denis_987 View Post
Usually, I always take small roads but this time, it is Mexico, and several government mention the danger of being there. And those small isolated roads seem a bit risky for my security (at least in Tamaulipas state)
Currently, I have two overlapping routes planned. So I can choose according to the feeling of the road. Also, I don't want to get stuck in the middle of the night in the middle of nowhere If I'm deciding not to bring my camping gear. (still not decided yet!). All my gear are in Texas right now waiting for me, so I have exactly one week to decide!
what makes you think more civilisation is safer? I think the more civilisation there is, the less safer it is. (more bandidos. while in the rural country side most probably people one meets are more humble and friendly. have not been to Mexico, so I can't tell.
For example here in EU most people think Georigians, Rumanians and Balkan people are robbers, that's BIG prejudice! They are super-friendly and hospitable people.

P.S. and of course, anything can happen anywhere. in our "safe" hometowns or in deep deep jungle in some of these ""unsafe"" countries. I always say to my friends: if you want to be safe, better don't move, stay at home on the sofa.

Last edited by str; 11-30-22 at 09:40 AM.
str is offline  
Old 11-30-22, 02:50 PM
  #41  
John N
Full Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 404

Bikes: Co-Motion Americano Pinion P18; Co-Motion Americano Rohloff (stolen), Thorn Nomad MkII, Robert Beckman Skakkit (FOR SALE), Santana Tandem, ICE Adventure FS

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 145 Post(s)
Liked 54 Times in 42 Posts
Originally Posted by denis_987 View Post
After checking for the Los Ebanos ferry option, I is very tempting to go by the ferry!

There is a Youtube video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VhjmnCBFTHU) that shows it. Seem to me at lot more quiet than any other entry point...and it is only 2$ as per in the video and also only 37 Km extra. It crossed a small town on the mexican side and not the crowded city of Reynosa.

The only thing that bother me is the fence on street view just before US customs in the middle of the road ( https://www.google.com/maps/@26.2400...!7i3328!8i1664). Will see by myself when I get there.
Here is the route I would suggest. https://ridewithgps.com/routes/41532438 to get across the crossing. Once in Gustavo Diaz Ordaz you can go your own way since this route goes further as it is a route I plan to take next year between Brownsville and El Paso. The only stretch that is not too fun is the ~2 miles on US-83 west of La Joya but that could be avoided by riding unpaved Old Military Rd. I have walked across the border and it was definitely an easy one. As others had mentioned, just be sure to get your visitor card on the Mexico side.

Last edited by John N; 11-30-22 at 02:54 PM.
John N is offline  
Old 11-30-22, 05:40 PM
  #42  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 12,586
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2490 Post(s)
Liked 780 Times in 650 Posts
while I have traveled by myself in some remote areas in Mexico and other countries, I do admit that touring with a traveling partner does feel a bit safer.
Now, we do have to be realistic, if a car pulls over and guys stick guns in your faces, it will not make a difference if you are alone or two.

Denis--I would suggest to don't answer truthfully every question you will get, like where are you going today, where are you staying--but of course it depends on who is asking you and how you feel about the situation. You can always just pretend not to understand. You can also pretend not to speak English also, "hablo solemente frances" etc etc
Oh, don't be surprised if people ask you directly how much your bike cost you and stuff like that. I've had this happen a lot. Just be aware that as "gringos" , we have a much easier life economically and in lots of other ways, so try to be aware of that and be careful of what you say. As "first world" people, we are extremely lucky being born where we were born.

There are no perfect black and white answers here for security, and being on your own probably brings in more risks, especially if you are pretty new to the cultural differences and your language skills are limited.
djb is offline  
Likes For djb:
Old 11-30-22, 10:00 PM
  #43  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
indyfabz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 36,008
Mentioned: 204 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16565 Post(s)
Liked 11,493 Times in 5,548 Posts
Please post reports and photos of the trip. Enjoy!
indyfabz is offline  
Old 12-01-22, 11:30 AM
  #44  
denis_987
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by John N View Post
Here is the route I would suggest. https://ridewithgps.com/routes/41532438 to get across the crossing. Once in Gustavo Diaz Ordaz you can go your own way since this route goes further as it is a route I plan to take next year between Brownsville and El Paso. The only stretch that is not too fun is the ~2 miles on US-83 west of La Joya but that could be avoided by riding unpaved Old Military Rd. I have walked across the border and it was definitely an easy one. As others had mentioned, just be sure to get your visitor card on the Mexico side.
Thanks! About the same as mine from Chihuahua, but instead of turning right onto Patricio Perez Rd direction US-83, I will continue on the "old military road"...small road, little traffic, dirt road in part but no problem for me and my bike (hybrid bike). Will be on the US-83 for about 0,7 km (half a mile) just before Chihuahua.
denis_987 is offline  
Old 12-01-22, 11:42 AM
  #45  
John N
Full Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 404

Bikes: Co-Motion Americano Pinion P18; Co-Motion Americano Rohloff (stolen), Thorn Nomad MkII, Robert Beckman Skakkit (FOR SALE), Santana Tandem, ICE Adventure FS

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 145 Post(s)
Liked 54 Times in 42 Posts
Originally Posted by denis_987 View Post
Thanks! About the same as mine from Chihuahua, but instead of turning right onto Patricio Perez Rd direction US-83, I will continue on the "old military road"...small road, little traffic, dirt road in part but no problem for me and my bike (hybrid bike). Will be on the US-83 for about 0,7 km (half a mile) just before Chihuahua.
The reason it is routed the way it is for the "last chance" of a major US grocery store (super Walmart). Otherwise, yes, if no groceries or supplies are needed before entering a relatively remote stretch just stay on Old Military Road. Hope you have a great ride. A word of caution. Do not over plan the trip as it really does ruin some of the "discovery" of the route.
John N is offline  
Old 12-01-22, 11:48 AM
  #46  
denis_987
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by djb View Post
while I have traveled by myself in some remote areas in Mexico and other countries, I do admit that touring with a traveling partner does feel a bit safer.
Now, we do have to be realistic, if a car pulls over and guys stick guns in your faces, it will not make a difference if you are alone or two.

Denis--I would suggest to don't answer truthfully every question you will get, like where are you going today, where are you staying--but of course it depends on who is asking you and how you feel about the situation. You can always just pretend not to understand. You can also pretend not to speak English also, "hablo solemente frances" etc etc
Oh, don't be surprised if people ask you directly how much your bike cost you and stuff like that. I've had this happen a lot. Just be aware that as "gringos" , we have a much easier life economically and in lots of other ways, so try to be aware of that and be careful of what you say. As "first world" people, we are extremely lucky being born where we were born.

There are no perfect black and white answers here for security, and being on your own probably brings in more risks, especially if you are pretty new to the cultural differences and your language skills are limited.
That for sure! thanks for reminding me!
I think "No comprendo" with my french accent will be use in those situations. Only two words instead of three! In the worst case I will speak in french!!!
Also, I read somewhere to show only a copy of my passport to guys disguises as "policia" to prevent money in exchange to get it back..
On YouTube, "The bicycle touring pro", (sorry don't remind his full name) that he pretended to be a kind of foul when he encountered a roadblock from natives in central america! Seems effective in its case!
denis_987 is offline  
Old 12-01-22, 11:49 AM
  #47  
denis_987
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
Please post reports and photos of the trip. Enjoy!
Will do!
denis_987 is offline  
Old 12-01-22, 12:46 PM
  #48  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 12,586
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2490 Post(s)
Liked 780 Times in 650 Posts
Ive ridden on lots of dirt roads in Mexico, and some (most) have a good enough surface, some though I was really, really glad to have 2in wide tires that make it so much easier riding over soft, loose or very rocky surfaces.
As your bike has 35mm tires, it probably will be ok on dirt roads, but it could sometimes be a bit of a pain in the derriere.
Hey, by the way, what bike is it?

I have passed through a number of protest roadblocks without any issues, they clearly saw that I was a foreigner traveling by bike, and they were not trying to rob people, so with a smile I was let through. The worse case scenario stuff is (hopefully) just that, worst case scenario. This is why it is prudent for you to read about the areas you are planning to bike through, just to hopefully get some insight into RECENT patterns, problems, reports of thieves targeting travelers, that sort of thing.

I really do hope that you have done some research. I realize that reading in English might be tiring and slow, I know when I read things in French I have to take so much more time than in English, so I get it. And probably the vast majority of trip journals are in English.

It will take a little while to get used to things, that is part of an adventure.
Just be very careful, observant, and don't flash money or an expensive camera or cell phone -- pretty basic common sense stuff.
Being alone, if you do want to visit any archeological sites, perhaps look into the possibility of being able to go on a day off when you can leave your bicycle and most stuff in a hotel room and go by bus or something to a site.
djb is offline  
Old 12-01-22, 01:32 PM
  #49  
axolotl
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,952
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 250 Post(s)
Liked 75 Times in 57 Posts
A friend & I visited 4 archeological sites in the Yucatan, 1 cave, and 1 cenote, all in the Yucatan and all by bike. We were able to either bring our bikes inside the gate or lock them right by the ticket kiosk. I've done the same all over the world when visiting various places. Maybe it's dumb luck but nothing has ever been stolen in those circumstances. I recall that when visiting Pompeii in Italy, they wouldn't let us bring our 4 bikes inside the gate. We were directed to a nearby ice cream vendor who told us that her 2 children would watch our stuff for a price, of course. I negotiated a price, a fairly modest sum. The children weren't happy because the price agreed to by their mother was for all 4 bikes, whereas the kids wanted it to be per bike.
axolotl is online now  
Old 12-01-22, 01:50 PM
  #50  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 12,586
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2490 Post(s)
Liked 780 Times in 650 Posts
Originally Posted by axolotl View Post
A friend & I visited 4 archeological sites in the Yucatan, 1 cave, and 1 cenote, all in the Yucatan and all by bike. We were able to either bring our bikes inside the gate or lock them right by the ticket kiosk. I've done the same all over the world when visiting various places. Maybe it's dumb luck but nothing has ever been stolen in those circumstances. I recall that when visiting Pompeii in Italy, they wouldn't let us bring our 4 bikes inside the gate. We were directed to a nearby ice cream vendor who told us that her 2 children would watch our stuff for a price, of course. I negotiated a price, a fairly modest sum. The children weren't happy because the price agreed to by their mother was for all 4 bikes, whereas the kids wanted it to be per bike.
I have visited places by bike also, in various countries, and yes, dumb luck is probably part of it.
Part of it too is calculating where to put the bike, and as you say Ax, judging who to talk to , and being able to converse properly, so that you can feel reasonably sure that someone is keeping an eye out on the bike/bikes.

every situation is different, every persons judgement and perception and ability to assess a given situation is also very different.
I have left my bike with a couple of nice ladies at an outside market stall in southern Mexico so that I could go into the large covered market and find a bag of fried grasshoppers to snack on, I've left the bike with museum security guys in Guatemala City to keep an eye on while it was locked up to a grated door near the entrance, or with shop people in large stores in numerous countries, including Canada and the States.
For sure it's part reading people and the surroundings, but for sure there's dumb luck....

I dunno, only by traveling and living in the real world can you hopefully develop good instincts, but there certainly is no black and white answer here--and lets face it, I don't know this guy at all , or know what sort of judgement he has, so it's really going to come down to him.
I certainly don't want to paint everything as scary, but I guess I'm trying also to be realistic about giving opinions on stuff.
djb is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.