Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

2 Classic Cinelli's totally submerged

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

2 Classic Cinelli's totally submerged

Old 09-18-21, 05:33 PM
  #1  
b_d
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Long Island and Sarasota Fl
Posts: 4

Bikes: Cinelli 1964 SC, Cinelli 1965 Chrome Track, 2012 IF Ti Cross with S&S, 2004 Rivendell, 2009 Tiwan Ti with S&S Couplers,

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
2 Classic Cinelli's totally submerged

Hurricane Ida was not kind to my bikes. Both my 1964 Cinelli Supercorsa and 1965 Cinelli Chrome Pista were completely submerged for about 18 hours. Totally covered in mud when they were saved. How do I go about restoring them? Will the water permanently damage the frame? Is framesaver enough? I know all the bearings will need to be replaced - but will there be additional damage?

Thanks in advance
Bill
b_d is offline  
Old 09-18-21, 05:37 PM
  #2  
3speedslow
Senior Member
 
3speedslow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Jacksonville, NC
Posts: 9,060

Bikes: A few

Mentioned: 114 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1863 Post(s)
Liked 779 Times in 496 Posts
Everything and I mean everything will have to be removed from those frames. Cleaned, dried and framesaver in every tube hole.

MO but if they were mine, that’s what I would do.
3speedslow is offline  
Likes For 3speedslow:
Old 09-18-21, 05:39 PM
  #3  
Gary Fountain
Senior Member
 
Gary Fountain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Hervey Bay, Qld, Australia.
Posts: 2,855

Bikes: Colnago (82, 85, 89, 90, 91, 96, 03), 85 Cinelli, 90 Rossin, 83 Alan, 82 Bianchi, 78 Fountain, 2 x Pinarello, Malvern Star (37), Hillman (70's), 80's Beretto Lo-Pro Track, 80's Kenevans Lo-Pro, Columbus Max (95), DeGrandi (80's) Track.

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 151 Post(s)
Liked 116 Times in 83 Posts
I hope you are lucky with the frames. I'd be soaking them with frame saver too. Being built of a high quality steel I'd guess that they would be fine after some quick action. I would also be hopeful with the components too. Good luck.
Gary Fountain is offline  
Old 09-18-21, 05:42 PM
  #4  
bark_eater 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Eastern Shore, MD
Posts: 1,478

Bikes: Road ready: 1993 Koga Miyata City Liner Touring Hybrid, 1989 Centurion Sport DLX, "I Blame GP" Bridgestone CB-1. Projects: Yea, I got a problem....

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 496 Post(s)
Liked 252 Times in 178 Posts
Where they in salt or fresh water? If salt I would be soaking the frame in fresh water before frame putting any oil in the tubes.
bark_eater is offline  
Likes For bark_eater:
Old 09-18-21, 05:53 PM
  #5  
3speedslow
Senior Member
 
3speedslow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Jacksonville, NC
Posts: 9,060

Bikes: A few

Mentioned: 114 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1863 Post(s)
Liked 779 Times in 496 Posts
^^ Good point!
3speedslow is offline  
Old 09-18-21, 06:26 PM
  #6  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 19,033

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 165 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5325 Post(s)
Liked 2,023 Times in 1,321 Posts
Folk here have salvaged a lot of bikes. Parts and the frame can be cleaned and restored. It can be done. It will be a lot of work.
bikemig is offline  
Likes For bikemig:
Old 09-18-21, 07:04 PM
  #7  
3alarmer
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 20,127

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 286 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22393 Post(s)
Liked 5,493 Times in 3,980 Posts
.
...I would take all the components off, down to the bare frame. Then pressure wash everything over at the self service car wash.
If you have access to compressed air, blow the interiors of the tubes dry, then treat with some sort of frame saver or this stuff.

Sometimes, depending on how it was chromed and painted, the brazing relief holes in the fork and seat stays get sealed up.

If you can shake them back and forth and assure yourself nothing leaked into them, you can leave them alone. But it's probably safer to just find them, and reopen them up with a very small drill bit. If you can see them already open, then concentrate on getting all the water out of them, and drying them out. The anti-corrosion oil wont bond very well with the surface of the steel tubing interior unless it's relatively dry in there.

If you don't have a compressor, it might be worthwhile to seek one out. the other thing that helps in drying is heat, so if it's hot outside, hang everything in the sun, once you have it cleaned as best you can. A heat gun from Home Depot, on a setting low enough that you won't damage paint and decals can help, but it's easy to get into trouble with an older Italian bike and the notoriously fragile paint.

Be careful with the pressure washer for this reason, and if it comes down to it, just use a hose and dish soap.

YOu don't really need to replace the bearings unless you see rust on the surfaces. They ride around bathed in grease, so usually do OK for a while underwater.
3alarmer is online now  
Old 09-18-21, 09:44 PM
  #8  
b_d
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Long Island and Sarasota Fl
Posts: 4

Bikes: Cinelli 1964 SC, Cinelli 1965 Chrome Track, 2012 IF Ti Cross with S&S, 2004 Rivendell, 2009 Tiwan Ti with S&S Couplers,

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks to all - Great points. I have a lot of work to do. The water was rain water mixed with lots of dirt and debris from the rivers. After getting the water out of the basement it was still filled with mud.
b_d is offline  
Old 09-19-21, 04:03 AM
  #9  
fishboat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 1,295

Bikes: Lemond '01 Maillot Jaune, Lemond '02 Victoire, Lemond '03 Poprad, Lemond '03 Wayzata drop bar conv(Poprad), '79 AcerMex Windsor Carrera Professional(purchased new), '88 GT Tequesta(purchased new), '01 Bianchi Grizzly, 1993 Trek 970 drop bar conv

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 470 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 397 Times in 233 Posts
To help in drying things out you can flush the nooks and crannies out with ethanol or acetone. Box stores will sell gallons of either.

I was a chemist pre-retirement. It was common practice to wash glassware and do a final rinse with ethanol to dry it if it was needed quickly. Water mixes with the ethanol or acetone(ethanol preferred) and the surface will dry very fast..good way to remove water from tight corners..tube ends..hard to reach places.
fishboat is offline  
Old 09-19-21, 04:20 AM
  #10  
Prowler 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Near Pottstown, PA: 30 miles NW of Philadelphia
Posts: 1,852

Bikes: 2 Trek Mtn, Cannondale R600 road, 6 vintage road bikes

Mentioned: 73 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 358 Post(s)
Liked 457 Times in 228 Posts
All good suggestions and I'll add one. As we're still having lots of hot sunny weather here in the east, I'd do what was recommended then stash the frame n fork inside my car, windows closed sitting in the sun. Makes a fine bake oven. Maybe put cardboard under the frame. Turn the frame and fork on occasion so various openings are up. Put the components inside too to force heat them.

Its just a car! A short drive with the windows down and the car will be right as rain.
Prowler is offline  
Old 09-19-21, 05:24 AM
  #11  
smontanaro 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Evanston, IL
Posts: 4,706

Bikes: many

Mentioned: 52 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 969 Post(s)
Liked 497 Times in 314 Posts
It's possible some rust has already begun to take hold. Evapo-Rust or oxalic acid will take care of that,.
__________________
Slowest Common Denominator
I prefer you contact me by email (skip.montanaro@gmail.com).

smontanaro is offline  
Likes For smontanaro:
Old 09-19-21, 05:32 AM
  #12  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 13,163

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 194 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4336 Post(s)
Liked 2,324 Times in 1,503 Posts
Sounds like you'll have your hands full rescuing your home and furniture, etc., first. So, ditto the suggestion to thoroughly rinse the bikes in fresh water to get rid of as much salt water and mud as possible.

I'm not sure I'd worry too much immediately about the hubs and bottom bracket. I'm always surprised by how well old grease holds up through decades of neglect. But headsets are more vulnerable because they're exposed at the bottom to tires kicking water and debris up. So I'd flush the headset and head tube with fresh water, but I'd probably leave the hubs and BB alone for now, other than an external rinse off.

And if you can't get around to overhauling the bikes soon, consider flooding every nook, cranny, crevice and orifice on the bikes with WD-40 to displace the fresh water and delay rusting. That's one thing WD-40 is really good at. Later, you can clean off the WD-40 and do a proper overhaul. But at least those steps will minimize and delay the damage.

Alcohol is good at displacing water too, but it may still be in short supply in some areas due to the pandemic. It's available in my area in consumer quantities, but not as plentiful as it was before the pandemic. And it's mostly 50% isopropyl. While that can be concentrated using plain salt (not iodized salt), I'm not sure it's worth the hassle. WD-40 is cheap and easier to quickly flood every part of the bike you can't physically reach without disassembling the bike.

Best of luck. Been through a few hurricanes, tornados and floods. It's always a PITA and can seem overwhelming and dispiriting.
canklecat is offline  
Old 09-19-21, 07:02 AM
  #13  
fishboat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 1,295

Bikes: Lemond '01 Maillot Jaune, Lemond '02 Victoire, Lemond '03 Poprad, Lemond '03 Wayzata drop bar conv(Poprad), '79 AcerMex Windsor Carrera Professional(purchased new), '88 GT Tequesta(purchased new), '01 Bianchi Grizzly, 1993 Trek 970 drop bar conv

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 470 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 397 Times in 233 Posts
I'd get the frame dry on the inside first, by whatever means, then hit it with wd40 or some oil..Framesaver.. etc.. The "displacement" portion of wd40 happens after it's applied to dry steel rather than before (i.e. it keeps it dry but doesn't dry it)
fishboat is offline  
Likes For fishboat:
Old 09-20-21, 05:12 AM
  #14  
Hondo6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: SW Florida
Posts: 127

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 43 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 45 Times in 30 Posts
Originally Posted by Prowler View Post
All good suggestions and I'll add one. As we're still having lots of hot sunny weather here in the east, I'd do what was recommended then stash the frame n fork inside my car, windows closed sitting in the sun. Makes a fine bake oven. Maybe put cardboard under the frame. Turn the frame and fork on occasion so various openings are up. Put the components inside too to force heat them.

Its just a car! A short drive with the windows down and the car will be right as rain.
Hanging them from attic rafters in hot weather should also work nicely. Attics get surprisingly hot - not as hot as a car's interior when the windows are up, but well above 120 F in many cases.

Last edited by Hondo6; 09-20-21 at 05:13 AM. Reason: Add last sentence.
Hondo6 is offline  
Old 09-20-21, 05:44 AM
  #15  
The Golden Boy 
Extraordinary Magnitude
 
The Golden Boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Waukesha WI
Posts: 12,866

Bikes: 1978 Trek TX700; 1978/79 Trek 736; 1984 Specialized Stumpjumper Sport; 1984 Schwinn Voyageur SP; 1985 Trek 620; 1985 Trek 720; 1986 Trek 400 Elance; 1987 Schwinn High Sierra; 1990 Miyata 1000LT

Mentioned: 77 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2295 Post(s)
Liked 857 Times in 514 Posts
I'm glad you're safe.

Best wishes in getting everything (not just the bikes) cleaned up and safe.
__________________
*Recipient of the 2006 Time Magazine "Person Of The Year" Award*

Commence to jigglin’ huh?!?!

"But hey, always love to hear from opinionated amateurs." -says some guy to Mr. Marshall.
The Golden Boy is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.