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Plugging Tubeless Tire

Old 09-24-23, 10:06 AM
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CaptMike
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Plugging Tubeless Tire

Hello all. At what point to you plug a leak in a tubeless tire? I must have gotten into some serious glass, or something, on the road with my 35mm G-One Speeds. Both tires have patches where fluid is seeping out. I've been running tubeless for a couple of years now, and have only seen leaks from sidewalls, after mounting. Two of the holes leaked enough for me to plug them. One definitely needed it, the other I just did it. I can see very small cuts/holes in some of the spots, but I think those areas have been sealed by now. Even before plugging the holes, I could get a ride in with them and they would hold the pressure. But the next day I would have to add air. At first I thought the sealant leaks/spots were from road oil. Thank you.
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Old 09-24-23, 01:13 PM
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if i was you, i'd be looking for better tires, and buying them... tires are cheaper than rims.

too-low tire pressure equals a greater chance of dinging a rim beyond repair.

my rule of thumb... two patches plus a new leak equals a new tube.
i don't ride tubeless...the same rule would be applied if i did.
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Old 09-24-23, 01:41 PM
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What sealant are you using? Lots of posts about sidewall seepage using Stan's, usually resolved by switching to Orange Seal.
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Old 09-24-23, 02:14 PM
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Originally Posted by CaptMike
Hello all. At what point to you plug a leak in a tubeless tire?
Simple. When the sealant no longer stops the leak is when you use a plug.
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Old 09-24-23, 02:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Crankycrank
Simple. When the sealant no longer stops the leak is when you use a plug.
Pretty much this. Over time you get some experience and can judge it. For me, if itís still spraying sealant by the time I stop it probably needs a plug. Sometimes one will seal up initially but later begin leaking again, and then I plug it.
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Old 09-24-23, 04:58 PM
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if the offending debris is still in the tire, but the sealant is holding the PSI steady, I'd pull the debris & plug it.
If the debris didn't nestle into the tire, leaving nothing in the offending area & the sealant is holding the PSI, I'd leave it alone.

In most cases, I'd retire a tire that has experienced 2+ plugs. If the sidewall was sliced to the point of it leaking, I'd also toss it.
I've had to trash a relatively brand new tire due to a gnarly debris vs tire event.
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Old 10-17-23, 08:47 AM
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Still apparently seeping some amount of fluid, but holding pressure. I must have really gotten into something, because a good amount of the tire leaks, all on the tread. Getting ready to head out West for the Winter, and will mostly be riding my other rim set with the 50 Overlanders, and my Fat Bike, so may see how long these can hang on. I do like these tires. Thank you all for the input.
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Old 10-17-23, 10:51 PM
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As somebody that has been running tubeless for a very long time MTB, some tires just do that. It is more common for the sidewalls to weep but not unusual for the tread to do it too. My light weight XC tires wept for two years before I replaced them, even the more hard core tires currently on my full squish have a couple spots that always weep. Never noticed any abnormal pressure loss. You can google tubeless weeping and see how normal it is. Yours may just look worse than it is because the tires are basically smooth and lets the fluid run more?
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Old 10-18-23, 01:07 AM
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Originally Posted by maddog34
if i was you, i'd be looking for better tires, and buying them... tires are cheaper than rims.

too-low tire pressure equals a greater chance of dinging a rim beyond repair.

my rule of thumb... two patches plus a new leak equals a new tube.
i don't ride tubeless...the same rule would be applied if i did.
TL tyres are a lot more expensive though. Iíve got 3 plugs in a rear, all of which wouldnít seal. It was 1 month old. Think I got really unlucky but no way was I buying a new one at £55. Itís holding up great now fortunately.
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Old 10-19-23, 08:19 AM
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Look watery. What sealant and how old. If water based latex it may have coated the tire and cured leaving water behind. Just a guess as Iíve seen the water when changing Bontrager sealant that was 6 months old.

Consider pulling the tire and patch from the inside.
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Old 10-19-23, 09:02 AM
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It is Stans in those tires. It is well under a year old. Not sure of the shelf life on Stans. Starting to look at other sealants. I have the orange stuff. As a matter of fact, it went in the original RH tires I had on one of those rims.
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Old 10-20-23, 06:05 AM
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Originally Posted by CaptMike
It is Stans in those tires. It is well under a year old. Not sure of the shelf life on Stans. Starting to look at other sealants. I have the orange stuff. As a matter of fact, it went in the original RH tires I had on one of those rims.
I use a sealant injector to check the condition. I sucked out this and added new. This is from both front and rear. For yours Iíd just remove the tire and patch it from the inside. With the leak there may not be much liquid left. So looking inside may be the only way to check.

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Old 10-20-23, 07:14 AM
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I did add more sealant to both tires after the initial leaks. I either use the syringe, or I use a leftover small Stan's bottle, and refill it. That works pretty good. You may be on to something reference patching the inside of the tire. I may do that. Thank you.
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