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Need to improve light for bike repair

Old 06-24-22, 09:34 AM
  #1  
Rollwithit
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Need to improve light for bike repair

I am looking to buy a Standing Light for my Garage Workshop Area so I can see my Bike better to work on.
Every time I work on my bike I have to take out small lights and move them around.

QUESTIONS
1. How Many Lumens will I need? The Garage Workshop Area is minimal, typical homeowner set up & has a couple of Overhead ceiling lights that are not great.
2. Would I be better with Halogen or LED lights? or other?
3. Probably wouldn't want to spend more than about $100 US.
4. Also, would (2) lamps be better or just (1) Lamp on the Light Stand?

I thought having a light on a stand would be the way to go ..., but I am open for Suggestions for other Methods. Thanks ahead for any input.
Attached is the Type/Style of Light I am considering.
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Old 06-24-22, 10:03 AM
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The two head tripod versions are for lighting a whole room -- for painting, etc. The 4000, 5000 lumen ones would light up a whole backyard for a project. I suppose those have dimmer settings?
LED for sure, they don't get hot like halogen.

A single head is easier to deal with for a task light that you might be moving from place to place. I have a cheap 1000 lumen flood that I put on my old tripod from the 500watt halogen days. That works great, and lights up a section of a room effectively. I actually have two of these since they are inexpensive, and it's useful to have light from two directions.

I got a Makita lithium powered portable flood light, no stand, just a frame to hold it and allow tilting. It's 450 lumens on low, 750 on high. I use both settings -- the 750 is too bright if I bring the light within a few feet of my work. The 750 setting can light up a 10 foot x 10 foot area with bright light.

If you have lithium powered drills, and perhaps other tools that use the same batteries, it's very useful to just grab the light and take to where it's needed. I'm glad I have it. (I wouldn't buy a cheap battery floodlight that has built-in batteries -- I'd expect they wouldn't last for very many years.)
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Old 06-24-22, 12:30 PM
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As rm -rf said LED are the way to go, no doubt and the bigger the better. I have old eyes so my shop is completely LED as is my stand. For me it is difficult to only use the stand with the daylight I get from the door as I do not have clearstories<skylights as I always have to see the back side for various reasons so I suspect have two lamps spread as wide as possible on your stand would help.
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Old 06-24-22, 01:21 PM
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These are about $15.00 at your favorite local hardware store. I use two, and clamp them where I need them.

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Old 06-24-22, 01:41 PM
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Thanks - good info
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Old 06-24-22, 01:41 PM
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Great appreciate it
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Old 06-24-22, 02:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Rollwithit View Post
I am looking to buy a Standing Light for my Garage Workshop Area so I can see my Bike better to work on.
Every time I work on my bike I have to take out small lights and move them around.
...
I thought having a light on a stand would be the way to go ..., but I am open for Suggestions for other Methods.
Why not just wear an LED headband light, e.g.: Duracell 575 Lumens COB Headlamp 3-Pack | Costco?
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Old 06-24-22, 02:42 PM
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Most (many) bike headlights have adapters so they can mount on helmets and even your bare head. My MagicShine LED lights do. Lowest power level is great for projects.
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Old 06-24-22, 02:57 PM
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I am a big fan of using light only where needed as @SoSmellyAir suggests, however, sometimes it is good to light your work area. I like diffused light whatever the source for working on things. Work lights are often point source lights that can cast shadows right where you are looking Usually it is you hands, arms or head that gets in the way. Diffused light doesn't cast shadows. I tend to like fluorescent LED replacement bulbs, however, I notice that they strobe at 60Hz. Slow enough for your eye to pick up. The good thing with them is that they are inexpensive. There a few ways to go on these. With ballasts, without ballasts. With ballasts is the easiest, and has worked for me.

My office lights are ideal. I would like to get these at home. They are thin, efficient and unfortunately more than I want to pay with everything costing so much more and my pay remaining the same.

If you can swing the cost this would be my recommendation or something similar:

LED Light Panel

I would love to do this to my whole basement. I don't have a dropped ceiling either. Just exposed beams, but there must be another way to hang them.
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Old 06-24-22, 04:04 PM
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I second Velo Mule 's suggestion above. My garage is fairly well lit, so I only bought these:

Artika Stream LED Under Cabinet 3-Light Set | Costco

I had assumed that Rollwithit has sufficient ambient lighting and wanted spot lighting to better see the details of what he is working on. I am not in any way suggesting to use a headlamp as a sole light source when working on one's bike (or anything else).

Last edited by SoSmellyAir; 06-24-22 at 04:18 PM.
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Old 06-24-22, 05:45 PM
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I replaced the light bulb in the garage ceiling with a screw in LED fixture. It makes a world of difference in the garage. I placed a second fixture in the basement for bike work.
Costco sells them as a two pack.
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Old 06-24-22, 06:49 PM
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I have a 4-foot two-tube LED "fluorescent" fixture over my work bench hung from short chains on hooks in the rafters. It provides a very bright but diffused light that is great to work with. These things are available at Home Depot, Lowes and Amazon at fairly low cost, like $50 or less.
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Old 06-25-22, 10:27 AM
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30 feet of LED goodness. Somewhere around 40K lumens if you can believe the manufacturer claims.


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Old 06-25-22, 06:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Rollwithit View Post
1. How Many Lumens will I need? The Garage Workshop Area is minimal, typical homeowner set up & has a couple of Overhead ceiling lights that are not great.
If you have fluorescent tube fixtures already you can just replace the tubes with LED versions, mentioned above, with a very simple wiring mod that just requires clipping a wire or two and re-connecting in a different configuration with wire nuts. Easier than wiring a wall switch. Sometimes the LED bulbs come with instructions to do this or plenty of YouTube vids.
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Old 06-26-22, 06:32 AM
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There are "plug and play" tubes that don't require rewiring, and then there are "ballast bypass" tubes that require, well, bypassing the ballast. If you're not replacing fluorescents, I'd say led strips are the way to go. I agree that directional lights can cast hard shadows that are less than ideal.

There are a number of "LED garage light" options that screw into existing sockets that might be good to look at.
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Old 06-26-22, 07:42 AM
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Those clamp on lights that Rolla suggested have been around longer than I can remember. They worked fine back in the day even though the bulbs were prone to getting broken due to being pretty much unprotected and the reflectors would get hot enough to burn down the shop if you weren't careful. Now with modern LED daylight bulbs which are often plastic and quite bright, they are a great, simple solution for many lighting needs.

And just looking at the picture reminds me of my dad. I think I'll go get one today.
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Old 06-26-22, 07:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Rolla View Post
These are about $15.00 at your favorite local hardware store. I use two, and clamp them where I need them.

I thought this is a heat lamp? We have one from raising young chicks.
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Old 06-26-22, 08:17 AM
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Originally Posted by SoSmellyAir View Post
I thought this is a heat lamp? We have one from raising young chicks.
These are great for many things and the bulb is what determines if you want to use it for heat or just use a bright LED bulb for lots of light without the heat.
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Old 06-26-22, 08:18 AM
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I would just run some wire and extend the circuit for more fixtures. Using movable lights is just an accident waiting to happen.
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Old 06-26-22, 08:40 AM
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Originally Posted by John Nolan View Post
There are "plug and play" tubes that don't require rewiring, and then there are "ballast bypass" tubes that require, well, bypassing the ballast. If you're not replacing fluorescents, I'd say led strips are the way to go. I agree that directional lights can cast hard shadows that are less than ideal.

There are a number of "LED garage light" options that screw into existing sockets that might be good to look at.
I put plug & play into my industrial stainless canted reflector fixtures. A little more expensive than ballast bypass but didn't feel like pulling those down to rewire.
I've bought a number of the cheap shop lights on sale and replaced all my fluorescent fixtures in the garage and basement with LED. It was often cheaper than bulbs for the old fixtures and reduced weight for hanging. I think the only incandescent bulbs in my house now are a couple outdoor flood lights and the oven.

​​​​​​https://www.menards.com/main/lightin...8502864&ipos=5
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Old 07-11-22, 05:11 AM
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Originally Posted by John Nolan View Post
There are "plug and play" tubes that don't require rewiring, and then there are "ballast bypass" tubes that require, well, bypassing the ballast. If you're not replacing fluorescents, I'd say led strips are the way to go. I agree that directional lights can cast hard shadows that are less than ideal.

There are a number of "LED garage light" options that screw into existing sockets that might be good to look at.
If you're replacing fluorescent tubes definitely go with the ballast bypass, since most ballasts eventually give off an obnoxious buzz sound.
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