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Fat Guy Wanting a Nicer Bike

Old 06-20-22, 09:06 AM
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B.U.F.F.
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Fat Guy Wanting a Nicer Bike

Hey there, this is my first post, so if I'm in the wrong place, my bad. Anyhow, I've recently got back into cycling, last year I bought a Jamis Coda S2 used and found out I missed riding. I typically do about 15-18 mile rides 4x a week, but I've been having issues with the bike and I'm pretty sure it's due to my weight. Last year I broke numerous spokes on both rear and front wheels, after replacing them (and subsequently breaking them) I just bought a new wheelset. Fast-forward to two days ago and I realized one of my spokes while riding was super loose. I took it to the shop and they're going to do a tune on it, but my bike is down until the 28th.

And now I'm bored to death. I don't know what to do till then, however, I have thought of buying a second bike, just for situations like this, and keeping the Jamis as a back up. I am eyeing a used 2017 Specialized Tarmac SL4 Sport, but their website says it has a structural weight limit of 240lbs, and I am 300lbs. Also, the 20H and 24H wheelset that comes with it does inspire confidence that it would bear my weight. Any thoughts on this? It looks like a very nice bike, but if I have to spend another $300+ on a wheelset, it just seems silly.
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Old 06-20-22, 09:21 AM
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what size tires can the Tarmac SL4 Sport accommodate ?

at 300lbs you will want to have a decent size tire under you


if max tire size is around 25 or 28mm - this alone might be a reason to look at another option
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Old 06-20-22, 09:40 AM
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Based on my Googling it looks like max tire size of 28mm.
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Old 06-20-22, 09:58 AM
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I really think you need to get a bike and wheel set that will support that much weight, and have clearance for, at least, 35mm tires. Not being critical, but, you probably have extra pounds you could lose. Otherwise, wheels are always going to be an issue. My recommendation is 36 spoke wheels with heavy duty rims. Modern wheel builds and wider rims, you could probably get away with fewer spokes. Having said that, here is a link, https://www.novatecusa.net/product/novatec-30/, to a pretty heavy duty wheel set. the rims are 20mm internal width, spokes are 20 in front, and 24 in back, but they are heavy duty spokes. The rear wheel is 8 non-drive and 16 drive side. This is to give you an idea of what to look for.
I have a set of these that I use with tubes. The hubs spin very well, the wheels roll just fine. They are heavy, almost 2000 grams for the pair. With the 20mm internal, some pretty wide tires will work on them. Wide tires will help support the weight. At $200, pretty hard to beat. There are other options out there for heavy duty wheels. Do some research. Also, I have to have at least 2 bikes just for the reason you stated in your post. I am on a self imposed, 2 day sabbatical from riding bikes. That is hard for me. I have to have other things to keep my mind and body occupied, or I cave and go for a ride. My legs were feeling quite tired as I have been pushing the mileage this month. The 2 days will pay off. I have gotten a lot chores and errands done, and have done some minor work on a couple of bikes.
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Old 06-20-22, 10:03 AM
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For sure I definitely need to lose weight. Appreciate the suggestion on the wheels.
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Old 06-20-22, 10:07 AM
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I don't think the Tarmac SL4 Sport is a good choice for you. Are you committed to going from flat bars to drop bars? If so , there are better choices, but honestly, the Coda you already own is better up to the task of carrying your weight than the Tarmac once the wheels are properly addressed. Ask the shop to stress relieve and properly tension the spokes.

If you want a different bike with drop bars, you might consider a touring bike like the Long Haul Trucker or Fuji Touring. They are built to carry a heavy load long distances.
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Old 06-20-22, 10:28 AM
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Originally Posted by B.U.F.F. View Post
Based on my Googling it looks like max tire size of 28mm.
maybe a gravel bike is an option ?

I've seen a couple of big football players on gravel bikes
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Old 06-20-22, 11:00 AM
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I feel your pain. 32 spoke wheels with 25-28mm tires will work just fine. I used a set of hybrid wheels off CL. Spoke challenged wheels are not for big people.
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Old 06-20-22, 11:09 AM
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B.U.F.F.
Welcome to bike Forums.

We have a section dedicated to just such questions.
You might want to go for a look by clicking here >>> clydesdales-athenas

All the best

Barry
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Old 06-20-22, 11:29 AM
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Went to a local bike shop, was convinced out of buying a second bike by the manager. Suggested wider rims with eyelets and a wider tire. Said nothing he had in stock, near my price range at least, would suffice besides an MTB, which I don't want to do.
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Old 06-20-22, 01:00 PM
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I also weigh over 300lbs. 36 spoked rims that are wider and high flange hubs will solve your problems. Availability of parts can get in the way. I recently purchased ebikes for me and the wife. Prior to purchase I contacted the manufacture and was told that the wheels were the weak point. I am replacing both front wheels. Velo Orange high flange front hubs. Ryde Andra 40 rims. Sapim spokes. I purchased belt drive ebikes so the rims and spokes is all I need for the rear. The Ryde Andra rims are as tough as it gets.
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Old 06-20-22, 01:29 PM
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Originally Posted by delbiker1 View Post
I really think you need to get a bike and wheel set that will support that much weight, and have clearance for, at least, 35mm tires. Not being critical, but, you probably have extra pounds you could lose. Otherwise, wheels are always going to be an issue. My recommendation is 36 spoke wheels with heavy duty rims. Modern wheel builds and wider rims, you could probably get away with fewer spokes. Having said that, here is a link, https://www.novatecusa.net/product/novatec-30/, to a pretty heavy duty wheel set. the rims are 20mm internal width, spokes are 20 in front, and 24 in back, but they are heavy duty spokes. The rear wheel is 8 non-drive and 16 drive side. This is to give you an idea of what to look for.
I have a set of these that I use with tubes. The hubs spin very well, the wheels roll just fine. They are heavy, almost 2000 grams for the pair. With the 20mm internal, some pretty wide tires will work on them. Wide tires will help support the weight. At $200, pretty hard to beat. There are other options out there for heavy duty wheels. Do some research. Also, I have to have at least 2 bikes just for the reason you stated in your post. I am on a self imposed, 2 day sabbatical from riding bikes. That is hard for me. I have to have other things to keep my mind and body occupied, or I cave and go for a ride. My legs were feeling quite tired as I have been pushing the mileage this month. The 2 days will pay off. I have gotten a lot chores and errands done, and have done some minor work on a couple of bikes.
\

I can NOT believe a 24 H trip being recommended for 3 bills.... things NEVER CHG here. That is just NUTS.

Do NOT buy second hand wheels.... for sure at your poundage. And do not sweat the scale reading... YOU are riding...

32's are ok... YET DO NOT chase those wheels now w repeated breakage. 32 requires high end built at that load.. quality components---see spokes. Factory wheels
mostly are not high end.. by miles. Bike shops notorisly are NOT QUALIFIED to true a wheel to 'stand'. IE... hold up.

Lots of us around that could set you up. Suggest a wheelbuilder w experience... worth the coins. By miles.
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Old 06-20-22, 02:37 PM
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I weigh less than you but regularly carry more weight than you + bike since I've always been a fatty on a bike I always make sure my wheels have quality hubs, strong rims, and are HAND BUILT from a wheel builder that has seen me, my bike, and my purpose. Like magic I've never broken a spoke, my wheels aren't flexible when I get out of the saddle, and they don't go out of true. My wheels aren't aero or cheap but they take my fat ass and anything I want with out drama and that has value.
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Old 06-20-22, 03:14 PM
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Originally Posted by B.U.F.F. View Post
...And now I'm bored to death...
Good time to learn how to true your own wheels. You can also replace your spokes with some stronger spokes. It's pretty easy to go to 13ga spokes if your are using 14ga.

Here is what it takes to start:

#1 - Youtube - (This is a GREAT TOOL!!!)
#2 - Spoke Wrench 5USD
#3 - Spoke Tension Meter 20USD
#4 - Zip Ties, Bull Dog Clips 2USD, or if ya really wanna get into it a Wheel Truing Stand (30USD)
#5 - Cassette Removal Tools 16USD

All these things can be bought for almost the cost of one wheel truing at the bike shop. Fun, Fun, FUN...
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Old 06-20-22, 03:47 PM
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May be out of your price range and availability may be an issue but for a new bike look at Salsa. Two years ago I asked about the weight limit for a Warroad.

As an ASTM Condition 2 bicycle the Warroad is rated for a 300lb rider and 55lbs of luggage!

Salsa has other less expensive models.
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Old 06-20-22, 06:27 PM
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You don't need a better bike, just better wheels. Personally I find 26-27c tires to be a fine width, I'm currently running 25 on my road, 25 on my track bike and 27 on my cross bike for summer use, and I find the tires to be fine and wouldn't like bigger than 27 unless I was riding dirt or gravel. Wheels absolutely need to be 32h or 36h, my gravel touring runs 32h rims and I'm typically within 12-15lbs of your current weight and another 40lbs with load so with the right spokes it'll do fine with 32. Spokes should be 13 gauge at the hubs, most spoke companies make that, built with a decent weight mtb rim and a decent hub. I used wtb rims that have no problem with 25c tires and can go out to 38c with no trouble but work well with a road bike. You want to find a shop that can build something similar and can do it for about 400.
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Old 06-20-22, 06:42 PM
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There is nothing wrong with your bike, the problem is wheels. For somebody your weight you need heavy duty wheels with 36 spokes and bigger tires.
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Old 06-20-22, 07:42 PM
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I also have a Jamis coda (size 21 for me) and have carried over 300 pounds of me and groceries.

​​​​​​I have a 36 hole wheel in back, it's been pretty bulletproof but still occasionally goes out of true. I picked up how to true wheels with the bike flipped over on bars and seat; its not that bad.

I can totally recommend the bike for losing weight and gaining muscle. I'm down to 215 from 328 two years ago. Jamis coda rules!
​​​​​
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Old 06-20-22, 07:55 PM
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Originally Posted by theapodan View Post

I can totally recommend the bike for losing weight and gaining muscle. I'm down to 215 from 328 two years ago. Jamis coda rules!
​​​​​
1.789 MILLION ATTA BOYS. WELL DONE!!!!
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Old 06-20-22, 08:36 PM
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I maxed out at around 270 and was riding 23s at the time with no issues. Most of the wheels Ive ridden were factory made and get out of true easily. Get good wheels or learn to deal with speed wobbles, Ive never crashed from a speed wobble and most cruddy back wheels seem to have several spokes that lose tension, and the wheel will be out of true but not dangerous in that it shouldnt hamper your handling significantly and wont fail suddenly.

also there are bigger boys than you riding little race bikes with thin tires, dont let people tell you youre too fat for a drop bar road bike. Also you want higher psi in tires, the thin guys will think the pressures you have to run are crazy
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Old 06-20-22, 09:07 PM
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At 300# you should also consider comfort. Skinny wheels and tires are going to translate a lot of harsh vibration and road chatter.

im a 6’4” 270# Clydesdale. I ride a Jamis Renegade steel frame and use 40mm wide tires on the road for comfort. I ride tubeless and fairly low pressure around 40-50psi.

Previously I was riding an aluminum Trek Domane with 28mm high pressure tires and that thing damn near shook my body apart and cause all sorts of spinal and nerve issues. That bike might be fine for someone up under 200# but not fine for a Clydesdale.
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Old 06-20-22, 11:10 PM
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IGH wheels are far stronger and so are Dutch bikes. Look for a steel city bike with a Nexus 7i. That's what my latest roadster has. I have NO problem going 100 miles with any of my heavy IGH bikes. I did change the front hub to a SA XL-FDD dyno drum brake.
I'm not heavy, but my 120 lbs loaded tour bike is, 290 to 300 lbs total. It has a 32h Rohloff14.
And IMO, rim eyelets are a useless gimmic. My wheels all have Velocity Dyad rims, 35 and 38 mm. One has 28,000 heavy miles and looks as good as new.

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Old 06-24-22, 05:54 AM
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The main thing is to keep your wheels well-maintained.

I weigh about an eighth of a ton---a little less than you---but I have been riding for years on 24- and 28-spoke wheels, with no problem.

Spokes break for two reasons, in my experience---potholes and similar sharp impacts---- and Being Too Loose. Check you wheels frequently---tap the spokes and listen for low-pitched vibrations.

As far as buying a new bike---go for it. But choose very carefully. Maybe consider a cheap bike as a back-up since you probably won't be riding it that often--How often is your main ride in the shop, right?--so maybe consider a decent used bike, and then in a few years, as your fitness improves, you can decide what you might want based on your needs and wants at that time.

Yes .... big people can ride, and love rising .... so keep living and riding and enjoying.
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Old 06-24-22, 10:04 AM
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Originally Posted by B.U.F.F. View Post
Hey there, this is my first post, so if I'm in the wrong place, my bad. Anyhow, I've recently got back into cycling, last year I bought a Jamis Coda S2 used and found out I missed riding. I typically do about 15-18 mile rides 4x a week, but I've been having issues with the bike and I'm pretty sure it's due to my weight. Last year I broke numerous spokes on both rear and front wheels, after replacing them (and subsequently breaking them) I just bought a new wheelset. Fast-forward to two days ago and I realized one of my spokes while riding was super loose. I took it to the shop and they're going to do a tune on it, but my bike is down until the 28th.

And now I'm bored to death. I don't know what to do till then, however, I have thought of buying a second bike, just for situations like this, and keeping the Jamis as a back up. I am eyeing a used 2017 Specialized Tarmac SL4 Sport, but their website says it has a structural weight limit of 240lbs, and I am 300lbs. Also, the 20H and 24H wheelset that comes with it does inspire confidence that it would bear my weight. Any thoughts on this? It looks like a very nice bike, but if I have to spend another $300+ on a wheelset, it just seems silly.
At your weight you HAVE to have 32 spoke wheels. I suggest DT Suisse. With your weight you have to be careful with any of the so-called top end bikes since they all have ridiculous weight restrictions. So look for cyclocross bikes which had wider tire clearance and frames that are built to take more weight and pounding. STAY AWAY from carbon fiber bikes. Aluminum such as the Trek Alpha series of the Emonda ALR. I'm not particularly heavy at 190 plus the bike and accessory weights but I have a Trek Alpha 1.5 that has an aluminum fork that rides quite well though aluminum bikes are a bit noisy with control cables ringing against the tubes. If you lose some weight there are some nice steel custom bikes and Salsa is a stock steel bike that rides well and doesn't have weight restrictions.

But at your weight you're going to continue to have wheel problems and you just have to get used to watching your wheels closely unless you're running 32 mm tires.
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Old 06-24-22, 10:12 AM
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All I can say is:

You need more than one bike.
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