Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Looking for an adult bicycle with 24 inches wheel

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Looking for an adult bicycle with 24 inches wheel

Old 10-26-21, 03:49 AM
  #1  
EarlGrey
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 39

Bikes: TREK 1200 SL (2006?), 1996 Trek 750 Multitrack (sold, great bike), many incomplete projects in the basement

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Looking for an adult bicycle with 24 inches wheel

Hi bikepornlovers,

I am interested in trying a "normal" size bicycle with 24 inches wheels.
Ideally, the bike would be a steel frame, with the look of the classic non-suspended mtb from the early 90s.

I have a probably false remembrance of such a bike made by Felt, but I cannot find it.
I have the feeling some producers built it at some kind of industrial scale, or at least that such a bike was not custom made.

Did my brain play tricks on me?

Sorry for placing the post here, but I am not sure it fits anywhere else.

Thanks a lot!
EarlGrey is offline  
Old 10-26-21, 03:52 AM
  #2  
unterhausen
Randomhead
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Happy Valley, Pennsylvania
Posts: 22,523
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 2,086 Times in 1,485 Posts
There are small wheeled bikes, but I think they usually have smaller wheels than 24"
unterhausen is offline  
Old 10-26-21, 10:37 AM
  #3  
tcs
Palmer
 
tcs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Parts Unknown
Posts: 7,060

Bikes: 1980 Mike Melton, 1982 Stumpjumper, 1982 Santana, 1984 Alex Moulton AM, 2008 BikeFriday tikit T-♾, 2010 Dawes Briercliffe, 2017 Dahon Curl i8, 2019 Surly ˝DT14, 2021 Motobecane Turino 1x12

Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1039 Post(s)
Liked 641 Times in 392 Posts
Note: there are four different, incompatible "24 inch" tire sizes (ISO 507mm, 520, 540, 547). Bike manufacturers are lackadaisical in specifying which one they use.

There are lots of 24" wheel children's mountain bike style bicycles; I wouldn't call them "normal sized".

There's the Dahon IOS and Briza, Tern Node, Helix, Airnimal Joey and Chameleon folding bikes for adults that feature 24" wheels.

For a classic steel diamond frame bike with 24" wheels, there was the old Schwinn Varsity model with 24s. Schwinn made a gazillion of these back in the 1970s.
tcs is offline  
Old 10-26-21, 11:20 AM
  #4  
70sSanO
Senior Member
 
70sSanO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Mission Viejo
Posts: 4,709

Bikes: 1986 Cannondale SR400 (Flat bar commuter), 1988 Cannondale Criterium XTR, 1992 Serotta T-Max, 1995 Trek 970

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1518 Post(s)
Liked 1,471 Times in 928 Posts
What exactly are you looking for?

A geared mtb? A single speed bmx?

Depending on your height, and how you want to use it, you can probably get a 24” and a setback post and riser bars and be able to ride it.

John
70sSanO is online now  
Old 10-26-21, 11:59 AM
  #5  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 8,812

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400, 2013 Novara Randonee, 1990 Trek 970

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2049 Post(s)
Liked 1,990 Times in 1,238 Posts
Felt made a "F24" small wheel road bike.
https://www.bicyclebluebook.com/valu...product/22985/
https://ksu.craigslist.org/bik/d/man...398734186.html
dedhed is offline  
Old 10-26-21, 12:14 PM
  #6  
ThermionicScott 
working on my sandal tan
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 21,722

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers), All-City Space Horse (hers)

Mentioned: 95 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3483 Post(s)
Liked 1,781 Times in 1,150 Posts
Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
There are small wheeled bikes, but I think they usually have smaller wheels than 24"
Yeah, the Mercer Nano and Velo-Orange Neutrino came to mind, both using 20" wheels.
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is online now  
Old 10-26-21, 06:50 PM
  #7  
cyclezen
OM boy
 
cyclezen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Goleta CA
Posts: 3,705

Bikes: a bunch

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 260 Post(s)
Liked 253 Times in 177 Posts
Originally Posted by EarlGrey View Post
Hi bikepornlovers,

I am interested in trying a "normal" size bicycle with 24 inches wheels.
Ideally, the bike would be a steel frame, with the look of the classic non-suspended mtb from the early 90s.
I have a probably false remembrance of such a bike made by Felt, but I cannot find it.
I have the feeling some producers built it at some kind of industrial scale, or at least that such a bike was not custom made.
Did my brain play tricks on me?
Sorry for placing the post here, but I am not sure it fits anywhere else.
Thanks a lot!
Not being sure what 'type' of bike you're looking for - I did just receive an REI email speaking about their REI Co-op bike brand being sold only to REI co-op members...
They do have a selection of 24" wheel bikes - labeled 'kids', but given the appearance the frame size seems appropriate for smaller adults also...
Prices are very low - AND REI does have a no questions return policy for everything they sell, no time limit - so the bikes are prolly of decent quality...
I wouldn't have any personal knowledge of these, but again, REI stuff is usually good at whatever level they place it.
Here's their search page with 24" stuff: https://www.rei.com/search?q=co-op+b...ze%3A24+inches
Ride On
Yuri
EDIT: Oh, sorry, just saw that you're based in Switzerland...

Last edited by cyclezen; 10-26-21 at 06:53 PM.
cyclezen is offline  
Old 10-26-21, 10:25 PM
  #8  
Russ Roth
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: South Shore of Long Island
Posts: 2,076

Bikes: 2010 Carrera Volans, 2015 C-Dale Trail 2sl, 2017 Raleigh Rush Hour, 2017 Blue Proseccio, 1992 Giant Perigee, 80s Gitane Rallye Tandem

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 785 Post(s)
Liked 629 Times in 477 Posts
Can only wonder why? There are plenty of used bikes that can be bought in any adult frame size with 650c (571iso) wheels which can often be mated to a 26" (559iso) wheel if smaller is desired. Seen plenty of serrotta and have been tempted by the possibility of a cheap Calfee in 54cm but the smaller wheels don't really benefit anything. I've never seen a full sized adult bike with 24" wheels, just 20". I think bikesdirect.com has/had a couple of them like this. In the years that I sold felt, 99-2010 I don't remember ever hearing of it.
edit: you may be thinking of Terry bikes which often had a 24" wheel in the front but they always had a 700c or 650c in the back which made the bikes awkward.

Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
Its just a kid's bike. Even comes with smaller reach shifters, narrow bars and shorter cranks.
Russ Roth is offline  
Old 10-26-21, 10:28 PM
  #9  
Vintage Schwinn
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 521
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 266 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 260 Times in 179 Posts
The MICARGI ROVER is the only current one that I know about. It is a decent basic bicycle with 7 speeds and the old tymey One Piece Crank that is both super simple and highly functional. It is a nice looking 7 speed Cruiser. As to whether it would accomodate an adult, the answer is both yes & no.......depends on the person's height, size,legs.......as I would doubt that someone that is taller than 5'-9" would be that comfortable unless they have shorter legs than most, but who knows, perhaps a jacked-up seat post might just allow it. reignbike, out of South El Monte California, on the bay carries this model. see #124916482959

https://www.ebay.com/itm/124916482958
Vintage Schwinn is offline  
Old 10-28-21, 05:13 AM
  #10  
EarlGrey
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 39

Bikes: TREK 1200 SL (2006?), 1996 Trek 750 Multitrack (sold, great bike), many incomplete projects in the basement

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks for your contributions, just ot clarify, I am looking for a bike with 24" wheels for a regular adult, not interested in a bicycle for kids that can fit an adult.

Yes, 24" are different formats: it does not matter.

As stated, the bike "style" should be a non-suspended steel frame from the 90s.

Why?
Difficult call. Out of curiosity, mostly. I suggest have a read at this blog entry where the experience that led Paul de Vivie, alias ‘Vélocio’ to a 24" wheels are quite well described/reported

https://hadland.wordpress.com/2012/0...dult-bicycles/ (stored permanently here)



Paul de Vivie, alias ‘Vélocio’, was the ‘father’ of French cycle touring. In the 1920s he advocated balloon tyres of up to 2.25″ (57mm) cross-section on 20″ (500mm) rims, giving an overall diameter of about 24″ (600mm).4 He reached his conclusions during a lifetime in which he cycled the equivalent of 15 times round the world ‘all of it as careful experimental touring work with a view to improving machine design and method of riding’.5

As early as 1911 he wrote:

“My own experience has gone no further than to 50 centimetre wheels furnished with 50 millimetre tyres, but I can guarantee that in an experiment extending as far as 15,000 kilometres covered, they will not have the smallest disadvantage from the point of view of their running. It simply seems to me they are more prone to skidding, but this is perhaps due to the fact that their tyres have no tread and that the bicycle is very short.”6

Vélocio died in 1930 and his obituary in the CTC Gazette7 included a photograph of him with an open-framed small-wheeler. Over the next ten years several British cycle tourists emulated his use of smaller wheels. They included A.C. Davison, Cycling magazine’s technical expert, and Medwin Clutterbuck, the CTC Consul for Sussex. Both riders used tyres of about 24″ x 1 5/8″ (600mm x 40mm). [Clutterbuck used 22″ x 1 3/8″ rims (560mm x 35mm).] Davison covered some 5,000 miles (8,100 km) on his ‘Little Wheels’ and declared it “a quite satisfactory bicycle”.8

Medwin Clutterbuck had two small-wheeled cycles built by F.W. Evans of London. On the first of these he toured the Alps, Dolomites and Norway, often on poorly paved roads. In England he covered up to 200 miles (320 km) in a day. Half a century later he still considered his second Evans-built small-wheeler “the epitome of what a touring machine should be”.9

The idea of a reduction of tyre diameter being matched by a corresponding increase in cross-sectional area certainly has merit. The volume of air and pressure remains the same as in the conventional tyre, while the wider cross-section compensates for (and can even improve on) the otherwise harsher ride of the small wheel.

As for rolling resistance, a reasonable prima facie indicator is the length of the tyre print (under a known weight) divided by the inflated tyre radius.10 For a given tyre pressure and load, the contact patch area is approximately constant, regardless of tyre diameter. (For example, a tyre inflated to 50 psi and carrying a load of 100 lbs has a contact patch with an area of approximately 100/50 square inches, ie. 2 square inches, whatever format the tyre may be.11) However, with the Vélocio approach to small wheels the patch is wider but shorter. Thus compensation is obtained for the otherwise higher rolling resistance.

However, this compensation depends on superior lightweight tyre carcass construction. This is difficult to achieve because, the larger the cross-section, the stronger the carcass must be to hold a given pressure. For economy of manufacture, the strength of wide section tyres often comes from thicker, heavier and less flexible materials, and results in a higher rolling resistance13.

Vélocio therefore advocated canvas-backed, thin, flexible carcasses produced by Edwardian English tyre manufacturers. In 1911 he bemoaned the fact that, for fear of warranty claims, such tyres were not made in France.

Apart from the warranty issues, stronger materials that enable thinner, lighter and more flexible construction cost more and there may be little demand. It is significant that Medwin Clutterbuck abandoned his small-wheelers after World War 2 because it was no longer possible to have his tyres custom made by the Constrictor company.
EarlGrey is offline  
Old 10-28-21, 05:24 AM
  #11  
North Coast Joe
Senior Member
 
North Coast Joe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: high above the pounding surf of Lake Erie
Posts: 602

Bikes: Couple of rigid MTB's and a fixed gear

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 60 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 11 Posts
Get yourself a nice pair of 559 rims, Renee Herse tires and a choice of thousands of frame styles for the same effect. And, much easier.
North Coast Joe is offline  
Old 10-28-21, 11:32 PM
  #12  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 13,221

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 195 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4386 Post(s)
Liked 2,418 Times in 1,568 Posts
The Tern Castro bikes have/had 24" wheels and a larger than usual frame for a folder. It is/was made in derailleur and SRAM 2-speed Automatix versions. No idea whether those are still available new.

If I'm recalling correctly Swift and Xooter also made folders with 24" or possibly larger wheels. I think those were also discontinued but you might still find a new/old stock or good used one.
canklecat is offline  
Old 10-29-21, 02:18 AM
  #13  
ThermionicScott 
working on my sandal tan
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 21,722

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers), All-City Space Horse (hers)

Mentioned: 95 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3483 Post(s)
Liked 1,781 Times in 1,150 Posts
Originally Posted by EarlGrey View Post
Thanks for your contributions, just ot clarify, I am looking for a bike with 24" wheels for a regular adult, not interested in a bicycle for kids that can fit an adult.

Yes, 24" are different formats: it does not matter.

As stated, the bike "style" should be a non-suspended steel frame from the 90s.

Why?
Difficult call. Out of curiosity, mostly. I suggest have a read at this blog entry where the experience that led Paul de Vivie, alias ‘Vélocio’ to a 24" wheels are quite well described/reported

https://hadland.wordpress.com/2012/0...dult-bicycles/ (stored permanently here)
I'm a little skeptical of their method in getting to the 24" figure. Today we scrupulously talk about rim specs, but in Velocio's day, it was more common to refer to bicycle wheels by their nominal diameter including the tire, the rim dimension being something that you inferred separately. The French system that gave us the "650B" and "700C" designations dates back to that time, and included small wheel sizes. 500A wheels (I'm not sure if there was a 500B or 500C) used a rim of only 440mm in diameter, so putting 50mm tires on rims of that size gives a total wheel diameter of only about 21.25".

Note how the wheels on his small-wheeled bike only came up to about his knees, maybe a little more. It would take a very tall person to make 24" wheels look that small! Yet, Velocio appears to be a relatively small guy in most pictures.


I could definitely be wrong about some of the fine details, but I think his actual wheel diameters were much smaller than 24", at least on his famous small-wheeled bikes. And if you hold up a ruler to a 26" MTB wheel, 24" is not radically smaller.

The point of all this is that trying to find or custom-build a bike around 24" wheels is probably going to be disappointing. They won't be small enough to get the compactness of truly small wheels like 20", and availability of parts like rims, tires, and tubes might be frustrating to boot.
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is online now  
Likes For ThermionicScott:
Old 10-29-21, 06:00 AM
  #14  
BlazingPedals
Senior Member
 
BlazingPedals's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Middle of da Mitten
Posts: 12,095

Bikes: Trek 7500, RANS V-Rex, Optima Baron, Velokraft NoCom, M-5 Carbon Highracer, Catrike Speed

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1370 Post(s)
Liked 529 Times in 345 Posts
In my experience, bikes with 24" wheels are usually kids' bikes. They have 24" wheels not because 24" is superior in any way, but because they fit smaller riders better. 24" tires are tricky to find, and finding a couple now doesn't mean that model will be available in a year or two when you need another. Unless you're trying to fit a small rider, I'd recommend staying away from 24". That said, my son's first road bike was a Raleigh with 24" (507) wheels. Sorry I don't remember the model. It was medium-quality with OK components and a somewhat heavy frame. Did his first 4-day bike tour on that bike.
BlazingPedals is offline  
Old 11-02-21, 09:01 AM
  #15  
jfouellette
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2021
Location: Montreal
Posts: 121

Bikes: Lombardo Power 2000 Minivelo (2014?). Norco Scene 2 (2021), Fuji M1 Minivelo (2015) still in box. Fnhon Blast build (2022)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 51 Post(s)
Liked 55 Times in 40 Posts
Hi everyone,

Maybe a solution to consider is looking at what is referred to as a Mini Velo. They are are based on 20 inch tires (sizes 406 or 451 sizes) but the frames are designed for adults. They are very popular in Asia and somewhat in Europe. Unfortunately they are quite difficult to find in North-America.Folding bicycles are made by TERN and Dahon in 24 inch but come with certain drawbacks due to the folding abilities. Priority Bikes also has a 24 inch bike for "juniors".
jfouellette is offline  
Old 11-02-21, 09:35 AM
  #16  
njkayaker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 13,001
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3321 Post(s)
Liked 813 Times in 569 Posts
Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
That's indicated as a "kids" bike in the first link.

Most 24-inch wheel bikes are either going to be folders or kids bikes (probably).
njkayaker is offline  
Old 11-02-21, 09:40 AM
  #17  
njkayaker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 13,001
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3321 Post(s)
Liked 813 Times in 569 Posts
Originally Posted by EarlGrey View Post
Thanks for your contributions, just ot clarify, I am looking for a bike with 24" wheels for a regular adult, not interested in a bicycle for kids that can fit an adult.

Yes, 24" are different formats: it does not matter.

As stated, the bike "style" should be a non-suspended steel frame from the 90s.

Why?
Difficult call. Out of curiosity, mostly. I suggest have a read at this blog entry where the experience that led Paul de Vivie, alias ‘Vélocio’ to a 24" wheels are quite well described/reported

https://hadland.wordpress.com/2012/0...dult-bicycles/ (stored permanently here)
That link showed one person who wanted the small wheel to use much wider tires and another person who advocated using small wheels with suspension,

You aren't asking about either type of bike.

Originally Posted by EarlGrey View Post
I am interested in trying a "normal" size bicycle with 24 inches wheels.
Ideally, the bike would be a steel frame, with the look of the classic non-suspended mtb from the early 90s.
I suspect no such bike exists for normal sized adults (outside of special cases like folders).

Last edited by njkayaker; 11-02-21 at 09:43 AM.
njkayaker is offline  
Old 11-02-21, 10:12 AM
  #18  
EarlGrey
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 39

Bikes: TREK 1200 SL (2006?), 1996 Trek 750 Multitrack (sold, great bike), many incomplete projects in the basement

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by njkayaker View Post
I suspect no such bike exists for normal sized adults (outside of special cases like folders).
Why are folders a special cases? Is there a canonical description of the bicycle in the Bible/Qu'ran/Torah/50shades of grey and I missed it?


Originally Posted by jfouellette View Post
Hi everyone,

Maybe a solution to consider is looking at what is referred to as a Mini Velo. They are are based on 20 inch tires (sizes 406 or 451 sizes) but the frames are designed for adults. They are very popular in Asia and somewhat in Europe. Unfortunately they are quite difficult to find in North-America.Folding bicycles are made by TERN and Dahon in 24 inch but come with certain drawbacks due to the folding abilities. Priority Bikes also has a 24 inch bike for "juniors".
Thanks, I have a Mini Velo, it is a solid but poor quality steel frame ... and it is a very fun bike. I use it in the city and even as a gravel/backpack bike. If I did not try it, I would not believe anyone telling me it could be so fun. So it comes my interest about 24" bicycles. But since it is a completely non-sensical choice that I do out of curiosity, I am still looking for "that" steel frame - styled as an mtb from the 90s - with 24 inches wheels. Thanks to all the interesting inputs (the Velo Orange Neutrino seems a great bike)

Last edited by EarlGrey; 11-02-21 at 10:16 AM.
EarlGrey is offline  
Old 11-02-21, 10:21 AM
  #19  
njkayaker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 13,001
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3321 Post(s)
Liked 813 Times in 569 Posts
Originally Posted by EarlGrey View Post
Why are folders a special cases? Is there a canonical description of the bicycle in the Bible/Qu'ran/Torah/50shades of grey and I missed it?
??? Are any bicycles mentioned in any of them?

It appears if you want 24 inch wheels, your choice is between a folder (of some type) and a kid's bike.

24 inches for folders appears to be fairly unusual.

Last edited by njkayaker; 11-02-21 at 10:33 AM.
njkayaker is offline  
Old 11-04-21, 06:37 PM
  #20  
ThermionicScott 
working on my sandal tan
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 21,722

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers), All-City Space Horse (hers)

Mentioned: 95 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3483 Post(s)
Liked 1,781 Times in 1,150 Posts
Originally Posted by EarlGrey View Post
50shades of grey?


I see at least one small-wheeler in there.
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is online now  
Old 11-06-21, 02:00 PM
  #21  
jfouellette
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2021
Location: Montreal
Posts: 121

Bikes: Lombardo Power 2000 Minivelo (2014?). Norco Scene 2 (2021), Fuji M1 Minivelo (2015) still in box. Fnhon Blast build (2022)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 51 Post(s)
Liked 55 Times in 40 Posts
Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
I'm a little skeptical of their method in getting to the 24" figure. Today we scrupulously talk about rim specs, but in Velocio's day, it was more common to refer to bicycle wheels by their nominal diameter including the tire, the rim dimension being something that you inferred separately. The French system that gave us the "650B" and "700C" designations dates back to that time, and included small wheel sizes. 500A wheels (I'm not sure if there was a 500B or 500C) used a rim of only 440mm in diameter, so putting 50mm tires on rims of that size gives a total wheel diameter of only about 21.25".

Note how the wheels on his small-wheeled bike only came up to about his knees, maybe a little more. It would take a very tall person to make 24" wheels look that small! Yet, Velocio appears to be a relatively small guy in most pictures.


I could definitely be wrong about some of the fine details, but I think his actual wheel diameters were much smaller than 24", at least on his famous small-wheeled bikes. And if you hold up a ruler to a 26" MTB wheel, 24" is not radically smaller.

The point of all this is that trying to find or custom-build a bike around 24" wheels is probably going to be disappointing. They won't be small enough to get the compactness of truly small wheels like 20", and availability of parts like rims, tires, and tubes might be frustrating to boot.
Velocio was probably short compared to the height of his contemporaries. I tried to find this information but didn't come up with anything. I'll try a french bicycle blog.
jfouellette is offline  
Likes For jfouellette:
Old 11-06-21, 02:03 PM
  #22  
jfouellette
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2021
Location: Montreal
Posts: 121

Bikes: Lombardo Power 2000 Minivelo (2014?). Norco Scene 2 (2021), Fuji M1 Minivelo (2015) still in box. Fnhon Blast build (2022)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 51 Post(s)
Liked 55 Times in 40 Posts
Interestingly the shared e-bikes in Montreal have 24" wheels. You have to search outside North-America if you want more options. I wanted a 20" mini velo and had to order direct from Hong-Kong.
https://bixi.com/en/ebike
jfouellette is offline  
Old 11-06-21, 06:17 PM
  #23  
BlazingPedals
Senior Member
 
BlazingPedals's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Middle of da Mitten
Posts: 12,095

Bikes: Trek 7500, RANS V-Rex, Optima Baron, Velokraft NoCom, M-5 Carbon Highracer, Catrike Speed

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1370 Post(s)
Liked 529 Times in 345 Posts
In the past, I've browsed AliExpress and seen carbon-framed mini-velos (451 wheels.) Not going to try posting a URL because they change weekly. If someone really HAD to have 24" wheels, another option would be a custom builder. Maybe that option is too obvious...
BlazingPedals is offline  
Old 11-06-21, 07:30 PM
  #24  
Nyah
No QR-disc or alumin F/Fs
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Shenandoah Valley, Northern Virginia.
Posts: 536

Bikes: '99 Trek 520, '20 Kona Sutra (FOR SALE 48cm), and a chromoly-framed folding bicycle with drop-bars and V-brakes, that rolls even while folded.

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 275 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 148 Times in 102 Posts
I agree with ThrmionicScott. The wheels in that photo of Velocio look more like 20", rather than 24".

With that, I recommend checking out the frame/fork that Simon-Bikes .de developed based on the 406 wheel size. I have one, that I'm still piecing together into a bicycle but can tell that it's good quality. When used with 50mm tires, this wheel size is quite respectable. It's a good ride and the tire size will always be available (whereas the 24" one might not have either of those qualities). I could've had a Velo-Orange Neutrino but the Simon-Bikes mini-velo, with its touring-length chainstays and reliable V-brakes, was more appealing to me.
Nyah is offline  
Old 11-06-21, 07:51 PM
  #25  
LesterOfPuppets
cowboy, steel horse, etc
 
LesterOfPuppets's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Valley of the Sun.
Posts: 39,313

Bikes: everywhere

Mentioned: 70 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8927 Post(s)
Liked 3,832 Times in 2,060 Posts
Originally Posted by EarlGrey View Post
Thanks for your contributions, just ot clarify, I am looking for a bike with 24" wheels for a regular adult, not interested in a bicycle for kids that can fit an adult.

Yes, 24" are different formats: it does not matter.

As stated, the bike "style" should be a non-suspended steel frame from the 90s.
you could get an actual 90s rigid steel MTB and get spokes, rims, and hubs to build a wheelset. Aim for one that has a kinda high BB, as everything will sit a little lower.

Make sure you get the 512mm 24", and not the 471mm, even those will put the bike about an inch lower, steering might end up a little weird.

In the 80s, Cannondale had the 26/24" mullet MTBs...
LesterOfPuppets is online now  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.