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Cycling in the rain

Old 12-01-10, 09:54 PM
  #76  
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Originally Posted by gerv View Post
That's pretty often for a rim change. Maybe I should send you my address and you forward me your old rims.

I agree about the cassette. If I get 4000 miles out of a cassette, it's toast...

New brake pads? Every 2000 - 3000 miles.
I think Seattle is just really hard on rims and brake pads in the winter. The roads are literally wet 3/4 of the time in winter, and when roads are wet, more grit moves from the ground to various parts of your bike. In addition, the entire city is built on fairly steep hills, so you have to brake hard quite frequently. I've heard many people here say that rims are pretty much consumables in the PNW.
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Old 12-01-10, 10:08 PM
  #77  
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Originally Posted by bragi View Post
I think Seattle is just really hard on rims and brake pads in the winter. The roads are literally wet 3/4 of the time in winter, and when roads are wet, more grit moves from the ground to various parts of your bike. In addition, the entire city is built on fairly steep hills, so you have to brake hard quite frequently. I've heard many people here say that rims are pretty much consumables in the PNW.
I guess I can see the popularity of disk brakes. Normally, I can get a quality wheel to last 10-15k miles. Maybe more. With rim brakes.
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Old 12-08-10, 12:24 PM
  #78  
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Riding in the rain is all right with a jacket if it's just light rain, but for days when it's just pouring buckets, I tend to take the bus, also.
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Old 12-24-10, 04:42 PM
  #79  
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Fenders, of course. Long as you can get. That merino wool base layer makes all the difference: If you do get wet, you still don't feel cold. I use them even in the summer if I know I'm going to get wet. I'd rather have the wool than a shell. Wool T-shirt and a windbreaker with the pit zips open, nylon pants for light misting and cover them with some gore-tex-ish pants when it's serious. You're throwing off enough heat that you cook off anything that gets through and keeping from sweating is a bigger issue. I like a hat with a big enough stiff brim to keep the rain off my face, though a helmet visor would probably work. On a typical ride of less than an hour I find thick merino socks with sandals are still plenty warm even with near-freezing rain, and for longer/colder rides the socks hold any toes that freeze off so I don't have to retrace my route looking for them.
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Old 12-25-10, 11:04 PM
  #80  
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I just use shorts and a t-shirt, and bring a small waterproof bag or satchel to keep my wallet/keys/music in if the rain gets very hard. The transition from dry to wet bothers me a bit, but once I'm used to the rain (>2 minutes usually) it's no worse than normal riding and sometimes quite nice if the rain isn't facing you.

It has gotten so bad that I can't ride in it (even here in TX) but I wouldn't want to drive in it either at that point.
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Old 12-27-10, 12:54 AM
  #81  
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What will be your instant reactions to worst case scenarios? (red light speeders at intersects, pedestrians jumping in frontayourbike)
Falling object, all directions.
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Old 12-27-10, 05:31 PM
  #82  
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Originally Posted by Senexs View Post
What will be your instant reactions to worst case scenarios? (red light speeders at intersects, pedestrians jumping in frontayourbike)
Falling object, all directions.
I've slowed down a fair bit by the time I reach the intersection so stopping in the rain is not a problem in the case of crummy drivers. Pedestrians out of no where are a problem regardless of the weather. I haven't hit a person yet (knock on wood) and I hope I don't, but the out of no where jumping in front of the bike will be one of those personal growth lessons for the pedestrian.
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Old 12-28-10, 03:04 PM
  #83  
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Originally Posted by Senexs View Post
What will be your instant reactions to worst case scenarios? (red light speeders at intersects, pedestrians jumping in frontayourbike)
Falling object, all directions.
Been riding for over 35 years, many of them on steel rim bikes with rim and/or coaster brakes. I have only had one incident where I had to bail, it was the thorn bush or the back of the garbage truck.

I ride defensively and it has served me well for these many years. I guess you could say I have developed a sixth sense as to what people are going to do. I have had many a car run a red light on me, but I could "feel" it coming and was slowed enough to avoid it being an issue.

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Old 12-30-10, 03:42 PM
  #84  
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Originally Posted by cyclezealot View Post
I find rain suits leak at the seams.. Best luck is water proofed tights.. Plus they breath better . During the rainy winter.. That sure makes Arizona not seem so bad..
Arizona is great, indeed. Except on the few occasions when we do get cold rain (like today). No one knows how to drive. Also, since I am acclimated to nice weather, I am a terrible wuss (psychologically). I have to bundle up like a North Pole explorer. Oh, well; I did have fun riding to work today, I must admit!
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Old 01-04-11, 09:59 AM
  #85  
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It took me a long time to find decent rain pants, but a couple years ago, my dad bought me a pair from MEC. Not sure they're still making them though.
They're great for the winter, but I find them too hot for any other time of year - wearing 2 pairs of pants, even in the fall, while generating that much body heat is just too much. The rest of the year, I wear either running tights or nylon shorts.
Also, here are some tips I found for riding in the rain.
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Old 01-19-11, 11:30 PM
  #86  
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The no-rain-gear method is valid and not so uncomfortable (except for the wet road grit that sticks to your lower half). I lived outdoors in the Army for weeks at a time without rainwear in my youth through some pretty wet and gnarly weather and I'm still here. I don't use rain gear here in tropical thunderstorm prone Tampa if I'm going somehwere outside, like walking my dog at the park. In fact the rain often feels like a nice warm shower. One thing that helps is a small hand towel of Malden Mills 'Powerstretch' fleece I carry to dry the important parts. It is very light and compact and dries like you won't beleive...not so much a towel as a flat sponge. Some outdoor retailers are starting to carry purpose-made towels of this stuff, which has some silver in the fabric to ****** bacterial odor. But you can buy a yard or two cheaply direct from MM.

But seriously, do you really want to drip dry at the mall or the grocery or the post office? Even if you don't mind please refrain from making the rest of us less socially acceptable, we're having enough problems in that regard.

There are no fully breathable/fully waterproof fabrics (W/B). And in Tampa I'm soaked from sweat after about ten minutes of riding around in my underwear in perfectly sunny weather. The only thing I've found that keeps me dry in the subtropics is a rain CAPE. Not a poncho. There are no bike ponchos...I suspect anyone who tries to use a poncho on a bike perishes in the attempt thus stifling any development or marketing.

I use this one: https://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___50258

It looks like it was sewn in the 70's from relatively heavy yellow oxford nylon. But it is well cut and that is everything. Has a waist tie and thumb loops, doesn't billow, tightly adjustable neck and non-vision hampering hood. Covers everything to just below the knee, quick to don and duff, doesn't interfere with lights or other mechanisms. Cons are it prevents turn signaling and increases side wind buffeting. Doesn't cover my butt while sitting so I dry my seat first if necessary. Careful dismounting not to snag and topple your machine. I keep it rolled up on my bike just in case. There are fancier and more expensive capes out there, made for example with W/B fabric or removable hoods, put I suspect the added utility is negligible.

No rainwear will protect your feet and lower legs. Fenders help but when you turn into a corner muck will be thrown up against your outside foot. I was once riding fenderless in a rainy 3rd world city where bikes are serious transport and sternly lectured that fenders are more for everyone else's protection than the rider's. I use sandals, or waterproof shoes and gaiters. I use Powerstraps rather than clipless pedals in part so my bike doesn't dictate my footwear. I have considered Rainlegs or other chaps, and a rain skirt, but so far cannot justify them.

A W/B jacket may work OK in cooler than tropical temps; I have one with full side length zips. Don't waste your money on Goretex or Conduit or Hyvent or Omnitech other older fabrics; they're a lot more W than B. You want eVent or Goretex Paclite or Pertex Shield or such. The DriDucks breathes better than most and is very cheap, but fragile. You may do better with an even more breathable water 'resistant' top if you can accept some moisture on your clothing. As far as rain pants, I think most will agree that this where perspiration and lack of ventilation is the biggest problem. So again water resistant may be better. You can apply some extra water repellent to the thighs which are exposed to the most water pressure. Again, you're gonna need some kind of shoe cover. If you use gaiters remember to pull the pants cuff over the gaiter, opposite of what you'd do in snow or mud. I just let my gloves get soaked. If it was colder here I'd consider ultralight overmits like the ones made by Camp.

But really, the rain cape just simplifies everything.
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Old 01-20-11, 05:35 PM
  #87  
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Excellent info in Brimstone's post. Thanks! This information will also be useful for us northerners, since we get a lot of our rain during the hot summer months.

The sham-wows also work as quick-dry towels. I take a stack of cheap cotton washcloths or shop rags in a plastic bag for drying my eyeglasses. These can also be used to wipe your shoes and the bike itself. They are more absorbent if you wash them in a washing machine before first use to remove the sizing.
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Old 04-09-11, 11:56 AM
  #88  
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Originally Posted by slide23 View Post
Actually I have. I used to work in medical software development, and as such I have access to a lot of medical research databases. There has been, in my searches, no occurrence of healthy, active adults developing hypothermia while performing aerobic activity. Is there evidence of this occurring? Maybe, but I have not found it.
Access to a database does not equal thorough research. I'm in the military, but don't know anything about ship hull construction...
Beef up your research - you'll find that the greatest risk of hypothermia is in relatively 'warm' weather when people are tempted to wear too little. A thin layer of sweat does its job a little too well and the body temp drops like a rock. Pretty simple, my friend.
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Old 04-09-11, 12:02 PM
  #89  
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Originally Posted by Sapling View Post
Access to a database does not equal thorough research. I'm in the military, but don't know anything about ship hull construction...
Beef up your research - you'll find that the greatest risk of hypothermia is in relatively 'warm' weather when people are tempted to wear too little. A thin layer of sweat does its job a little too well and the body temp drops like a rock. Pretty simple, my friend.
So you are aware of cases where healthy adults engaged in aerobic exercise (not necessarily boat construction) developed hypothermia? Can you give more details or links?
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Old 04-10-11, 06:52 PM
  #90  
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FWIW, WedMD believes it's possible. "Healthy" has nothing to do with susceptibility to hypothermia:
https://firstaid.webmd.com/tc/hypothe...topic-overview
Another useful read:
https://www.***.edu.br/professores/po...Cyrino/A13.pdf


Apparently 1 or 2 runners were evaluated for hypothermia in last month's Los Angeles Marathon. Some were actually taken to the hospital, although the author of the article doesn't bother to find out whether or not they were medically diagnosed as such. I'm guessing the LA Marathon medical staff didn't write off hypothermia simply because many of the event participants were probably 'healthy adults.'
https://latimesblogs.latimes.com/spor...pothermia.html


Swimming comes to mind as the obvious activity in which one could become hypothermic. This article states, "Surprisingly, even well conditioned, properly trained and experienced English Channel swimmers have suffered unexpected fatalities even within relatively short periods of 5-6 hours after the onset of their swim and in water temperatures of 20C. Individual tolerance is highly variable and can be significantly diminished when conditions are poor such as cold ambient temperature and rough weather. Bad weather can lengthen the duration of the swims inducing extreme fatigue and exposure. Prolonged swims in water temperatures below 16C (60F) particularly when the ambient temperatures are low and in absence of sunny conditions could lower the resistance and tolerance of the individual swimmer and might explain adverse outcomes."
https://www.doversolo.com/hypothermia.htm


I'm going to go out on a limb and state that Jackson Stewart, when he abandoned the Tour of California in 2008, was a reasonably healthy adult:
https://www.bicycle.net/2008/hypother...ed-to-hospital


And I suppose if those links don't provide any valuable info, try this one, and 'have it your way."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CJMsFGH4eoQ


Amazing what a guy w/ no medical training, other than lots of first aid, can do with Google.

Last edited by Sapling; 04-10-11 at 06:56 PM. Reason: added information
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Old 04-10-11, 08:30 PM
  #91  
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Originally Posted by nostalgic View Post
I have not ridden my bicycle in the rain yet. I'm taking the bus today because there is a 60% chance of rain. I'm unsure as to how to ride in the rain, so...

Would it be best to wear a raincoat and poncho? Or what?
I thought you said "Crying in the rain"
I just figger ,,get soaked,,,I HATE SNOW,,,,Hate cars more,,,I am a hateful person aren't I.
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Old 08-12-21, 09:22 PM
  #92  
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Wet days may now be more common than dry days in Soggy Bottom Michigan. I avoid buying new clothes or new anything, but a cape and some accessories would be cheaper than a car. I have thought of buying a car, but car prices are higher now while carmakers wait for microchip production. Car prices might drop just in time for a fuel price jump.
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Old 08-13-21, 11:52 PM
  #93  
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Originally Posted by folder fanatic View Post
Rain is one of the few times I avoid using bikes around here. It is not the bike itself I am worried about, it is the drivers that are not used to driving cars in the rain. This can be a very dangerous time to be on a bike.
Oft repeated and completely false rhetoric. The drivers around you have driven in everything you have at least 20 times or more. The exceptions wouldn't fill the visitors bleachers at Providence Park Stadium (MLS). If the drivers in your town are bad in the rain, they are bad when it's dry as well. That's just drivers being drivers. Aren't you a driver? Another truth about drivers is they all think they are the only driver in town with skillz. You don't like riding in the rain, fine. Own it. Why are you throwing shade on your cager colleagues? So few cyclists ride in the rain that I really must wonder out loud how they would know that it is any more dangerous than any other time! Let's see some stats. Put some numbers on it. My educated guess is that, yes, VEHICLE/VEHICLE collisions increase in frequency and severity in inclement weather, but vehicle/bicycle collisions drop to almost zero in inclement weather. And not for the obvious reason either. The main reason is that cyclists that are out in bad weather are paying more attention and riding more carefully than when the weather is better.
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Old 08-15-21, 06:16 AM
  #94  
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I would ride slower, but that's about it. Inclement weather is more like a game. I enjoy going through puddles, just like when I was a kid. I asked someone do you stop life when it rains? Shopping, movies...etc. For most people the answer is no. Everything is possible when your walk or ride a bicycle. When you drive we somehow come up with excuses on why we can't do things. I saw this on youtube. Enjoy!

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Old 08-19-21, 08:48 AM
  #95  
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Originally Posted by Robert Foster View Post
Everyone knows I don't care for cycling in the rain. I Care even less for cycling in the snow and cant even picture why anyone would cycle in ice. Yes I know they do but playing the semantics card for Roody I dont think we are brainwashed because even dogs seek shelter from the rain. We just have the ability of making it less uncomfortable by using proper gear.

I have enjoyed riding this year even more than I did last year even if I am almost 2000 miles short of my mileage last year. So when we got our first reasonable rain storm this week I have been playing hide and seek with the rain all week. I finally broke down and asked a bike guru friend of mine from Seattle what I should carry if I plan on riding in the rain at all. He has given me some valid suggestions and has even talked me into some short night riding, another pleasure some enjoy far more than I do but I now sport a 150 watt nightrider.

Thank goodness we dont get much rain a year but to follow Roodys suggestion about shoes I would have to change pedals even on my MTB. Everything I ride now has clip-less pedals and the MTB has egg beaters. I have to go with covers or switch to platform pedals.
So a rain jacket, rain pants or shorts, shoe covers and full fingered gloves will do the trick where I live. It is still not as comfortable and not being exposed to the rain in the first place but it will allow me to ride if I must get somewhere and I dont want to drive.
As much as I detest summer, that's the only part of Winter that gives me pause.

One time 4 years ago I got caught in a rain storm at night in August. I got soaked, but it was neat. It was a warm rain, and I actually liked it. Didn't have to go to far though.
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Old 08-29-21, 01:31 PM
  #96  
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I went without a car for 4 years. 3 bikes and a motorcycle were my modes of transportation.

Gore-Tex head to toe, ankle high hiking boots, rain pants, super light rain jacket, and full face helmet kept me bone dry. Yes, it's not breathable... if it keeps out rain, then it keeps out wind as well. But it does keep you dry.
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Old 09-01-21, 02:12 PM
  #97  
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J&G rain cape + a helmet cover + a bicycle with proper fenders is all I need to thwart the rain. No other rain gear necessary.
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Old 05-05-22, 10:15 AM
  #98  
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A nice rain cape is essential IMO.
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Old 05-06-22, 04:36 PM
  #99  
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I don't cycle in the rain anymore, and rarely did when I cycled more, but have an Outdoor Research Furio on today because it was raining like hell. I used this same jacket has a soaker riding jacket, and it will keep you dry. Also has a hood that will accommodate a helmet. The hood is excellent and easily moves with your head. Jacket unzips on the sides and becomes a poncho. Mine is an older jacket from around 2012. I am not sure how the current model is made.
The Foray is another model by OR that's excellent.
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Old 05-06-22, 05:09 PM
  #100  
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I ride way to much in the rain. but most of the time its cold rain here in portland. I have a good showers pass Jacket that I think I will replace with a really good goretex jacket as it gets dirty just looking at it and it tends to get damp and to dry out fully for the evening ride home. I did find felt lined waterproof pants to wear when the rain is not super heavy and they keep my legs warm and I can work in them. waterproof shoes I change out of. but Just bought a good light weight goretex jacket thats easy to carry for the warmer rain rides. the water proof pants are too warm really. got a set of chrome water resistant pants that get too hot at 70 but for some reason they did not water resist the crotch so all the water that runs off the coat goes right there.
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