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Bleeding the beast.

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Bleeding the beast.

Old 10-28-21, 08:46 PM
  #1  
fooferdoggie 
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Bleeding the beast.

I had to bleed the rear brake it has been getting too hot on our descents the rotor would get black gunk on it then it started getting mushy. so I bought a cheap bike lift kit but the hooks were more like a L then a hook so I did not trust them so I just wrapped the rope it around the frame. I wanted to lift the rear too so I didn't to have to bend down so far. spilled the bottle of fluid twice and made more then the usual mess. but got it lots of dark fluid. we really need to make sure the back does not overheat, the pics dont not show the black well but it was sure in the cup and line.



Last edited by fooferdoggie; 10-28-21 at 08:57 PM.
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Old 10-29-21, 10:18 AM
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Leisesturm
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No, bleeding brakes is not rocket science. But ... needing to bleed a brake (rear!) because it is overheating? Your work area does NOT inspire me with confidence. Just keep in mind that there are TWO people on that thing when you take it out in traffic. That is one job I would have left to a trained professional. Or at least if I did it myself I would be doing it by the book. Which you may have. But IDK ... didn't you have issues with brakes already and went to four piston calipers? What size are the rotors? Those are what I would have changed back when you had the caliper issue. Are they IceTech rotors or some other kind of heat shedding design? The front brake sees much harder use. It should be boiling hydraulic fluid as well. Does it? Maybe you are overusing the rear brake on descents? You don't have a drag brake so you have no choice but to make the front brake more of a player and take some of the burden on the rear. Just be careful and safe. It's dangerous enough out there with the crap that no one has any control over. Don't make matters worse and take on projects that have a direct impact on safety unless fully up to speed on the technology. I know, I know, I'm over a line, but some of your stories Foof ... just be careful.
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Old 10-29-21, 04:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm View Post
No, bleeding brakes is not rocket science. But ... needing to bleed a brake (rear!) because it is overheating? Your work area does NOT inspire me with confidence. Just keep in mind that there are TWO people on that thing when you take it out in traffic. That is one job I would have left to a trained professional. Or at least if I did it myself I would be doing it by the book. Which you may have. But IDK ... didn't you have issues with brakes already and went to four piston calipers? What size are the rotors? Those are what I would have changed back when you had the caliper issue. Are they IceTech rotors or some other kind of heat shedding design? The front brake sees much harder use. It should be boiling hydraulic fluid as well. Does it? Maybe you are overusing the rear brake on descents? You don't have a drag brake so you have no choice but to make the front brake more of a player and take some of the burden on the rear. Just be careful and safe. It's dangerous enough out there with the crap that no one has any control over. Don't make matters worse and take on projects that have a direct impact on safety unless fully up to speed on the technology. I know, I know, I'm over a line, but some of your stories Foof ... just be careful.
Pretty harsh response I won't let any bike shop near my tandem the buck stops with me. We live on the side of a hill so get plenty of braking practice both back and front get a work out but as with my singles it's the back that wears faster. Heat management is tricky if you are stuck behind a vehicle or the gradient ends with a stop sign. We have 203mm discs icetech front and magura e bike floating disc on the rear managing the heat build up isn't always straight forward. When the time comes for a full bleed I may try the gravity method and will report back.
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Old 10-29-21, 04:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm View Post
No, bleeding brakes is not rocket science. But ... needing to bleed a brake (rear!) because it is overheating? Your work area does NOT inspire me with confidence. Just keep in mind that there are TWO people on that thing when you take it out in traffic. That is one job I would have left to a trained professional. Or at least if I did it myself I would be doing it by the book. Which you may have. But IDK ... didn't you have issues with brakes already and went to four piston calipers? What size are the rotors? Those are what I would have changed back when you had the caliper issue. Are they IceTech rotors or some other kind of heat shedding design? The front brake sees much harder use. It should be boiling hydraulic fluid as well. Does it? Maybe you are overusing the rear brake on descents? You don't have a drag brake so you have no choice but to make the front brake more of a player and take some of the burden on the rear. Just be careful and safe. It's dangerous enough out there with the crap that no one has any control over. Don't make matters worse and take on projects that have a direct impact on safety unless fully up to speed on the technology. I know, I know, I'm over a line, but some of your stories Foof ... just be careful.
I have bled brakes several times but this is the first on the back. if I messed it up I would have taken it in. I am somewhat of a clutz and working so low to the ground is hard on me. I know How to make it easier next time. I think I do use the back more. plus I keep it at 25 so so that takes more braking. I usually let off one for a bit then switch but we have a rim brake and I am going to have my wife use that more. we have a lot of steep hills in Portland too. we go down one a few times a week thats 20% grade. I need to use the front more to balance it out. we do have use tech 203 rotors. the back has been getting black gunk on it from overheating. so I am going to work on my braking. but do a lot of hills on our rides. 40 miles 3000 feet of climbing and close to the same descending.
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Old 10-29-21, 05:44 PM
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I dont think I have overheated them as I have never lost any brake power. but I do use the back the most. wee go through pads pretty fast maybe 1200 miles on a set of metallic pads. last month we climbed 31250feet and came down at least that much too.

Last edited by fooferdoggie; 10-29-21 at 06:02 PM.
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Old 10-30-21, 10:27 AM
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Originally Posted by fooferdoggie View Post
Ö I am somewhat of a clutz and working so low to the ground is hard on me.
I hear you, having to work bent over or on my knees is very painful for me. I solved by using a tall work stand, there is a thread from last August with examples. Itís tall enough to be able to bleed the brakes. The way I get my eTandem into the stand is I lock the handlebars in the forward position with a tool from Park then I lift the front wheel onto a barstool, then lift the rear of the bike up and set it in the stand holder and tighten everything up. Removing from the stand is the opposite.

as for the cheap lift, yes, the hooks are worthless. You need to bend them into a hook shape but the steel is very hard. It took a bench vice and many whacks with a big hammer to forge them into shape. Works great now.
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Old 10-30-21, 10:42 AM
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there is a lot of slope on the hose so maybe just taking off the caliper will do the job. a coupe hooks and some piles will work much better. hopefully it will be awhile before it needs it again.. the front is a tiny bit mushy so maybe I will do it today. I wish the park tools kit had clips to hold the hose on. I found a cheap bleed kit with the clip so I bought it just to get that clip.
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