Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Living Car Free
Reload this Page >

Cycling in the rain

Notices
Living Car Free Do you live car free or car light? Do you prefer to use alternative transportation (bicycles, walking, other human-powered or public transportation) for everyday activities whenever possible? Discuss your lifestyle here.

Cycling in the rain

Old 11-16-10, 04:49 PM
  #51  
Artkansas 
Pedaled too far.
 
Artkansas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: La Petite Roche
Posts: 12,851
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by folder fanatic View Post
Rain is one of the few times I avoid using bikes around here. It is not the bike itself I am worried about, it is the drivers that are not used to driving cars in the rain. This can be a very dangerous time to be on a bike.
Too true. When I lived there, it seemed like L.A. drivers sped up in the rain, trying to get home before their cars got wet.
__________________
"He who serves all, best serves himself" Jack London

Originally Posted by Bjforrestal View Post
I don't care if you are on a unicycle, as long as you're not using a motor to get places you get props from me. We're here to support each other. Share ideas, and motivate one another to actually keep doing it.
Artkansas is offline  
Old 11-16-10, 04:52 PM
  #52  
Artkansas 
Pedaled too far.
 
Artkansas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: La Petite Roche
Posts: 12,851
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by Roody View Post
This reminds me of my 11 year old grandson. I asked him if he was going swimming. He said, "No, it's raining a little and I don't want to get wet walking to the pool."

Awww. Once I got to swim in a heated pool during a snowstorm. That was fun. And half of the pool was indoors so you could get out and still be warm.
__________________
"He who serves all, best serves himself" Jack London

Originally Posted by Bjforrestal View Post
I don't care if you are on a unicycle, as long as you're not using a motor to get places you get props from me. We're here to support each other. Share ideas, and motivate one another to actually keep doing it.
Artkansas is offline  
Old 11-16-10, 08:03 PM
  #53  
Pedaleur
Je pose, donc je suis.
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Back. Here.
Posts: 2,898
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 1 Post
Originally Posted by chucky View Post
P.S. Don't listen to nonsense from roadies about "base layers" and other crap like that.

Roadies overdress because they don't seem to think they're exercising unless they're a sweaty mess at the end of riding, but the nice thing about cold is it can balance out the extra body heat you're generating so you don't have to sweat while riding.

You could ride naked down to about freezing. Below that a single layer of "expedition weight" polyester or wool ski thermals along with a good pair of earmuffs and a good pair of gloves is all that's needed in most parts of the US.
Wow, are you clueless.
Pedaleur is offline  
Old 11-16-10, 08:04 PM
  #54  
Pedaleur
Je pose, donc je suis.
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Back. Here.
Posts: 2,898
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Roody View Post
Most people never get to know what it's like to ride a bike on a "perfect" day because they're stuck in their cars. I pity these ones! Even in michigan, which is famous for "bad" weather, we get at least 5 nice days for every crappy one. The thing is, if you have a car, you're in it for the good and the bad days--and the same with a bike--you have to take the bad with the good. That's what life is all about.

If you ride in a snow storm, you have something to brag about and something to whine about. And bragging and whining are two of the funnest things in life!
I love riding in the snow. 34 and raining, not so much.

For all of the rest fighting over Seattle vs. Mobile, move to Denmark for a while and get back to me... ;-)
Pedaleur is offline  
Old 11-16-10, 09:11 PM
  #55  
Robert Foster
Banned.
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Southern california
Posts: 3,498

Bikes: Lapierre CF Sensium 400. Jamis Ventura Sport. Trek 800. Giant Cypress.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Pedaleur View Post
I love riding in the snow. 34 and raining, not so much.

For all of the rest fighting over Seattle vs. Mobile, move to Denmark for a while and get back to me... ;-)
I hope you notice I don't "live" in either city?
Robert Foster is offline  
Old 11-16-10, 09:23 PM
  #56  
oban_kobi
Senior Member
 
oban_kobi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: California
Posts: 542

Bikes: Trek 7.2 FX, Custom Vintage FG

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by chucky View Post
P.S. Don't listen to nonsense from roadies about "base layers" and other crap like that.

Roadies overdress because they don't seem to think they're exercising unless they're a sweaty mess at the end of riding, but the nice thing about cold is it can balance out the extra body heat you're generating so you don't have to sweat while riding.

You could ride naked down to about freezing. Below that a single layer of "expedition weight" polyester or wool ski thermals along with a good pair of earmuffs and a good pair of gloves is all that's needed in most parts of the US.
What the frak? You're joking right? I'm not a "roadie", but I quickly learned the virtues of base layers. If I road naked at freezing, my future children would vanish from existence. Layers are your friends.

Last edited by oban_kobi; 11-16-10 at 09:24 PM. Reason: friends
oban_kobi is offline  
Old 11-16-10, 10:21 PM
  #57  
Robert Foster
Banned.
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Southern california
Posts: 3,498

Bikes: Lapierre CF Sensium 400. Jamis Ventura Sport. Trek 800. Giant Cypress.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by oban_kobi View Post
What the frak? You're joking right? I'm not a "roadie", but I quickly learned the virtues of base layers. If I road naked at freezing, my future children would vanish from existence. Layers are your friends.
+1 to that. Long fingered gloves and a Balaclava help as well. This year I believe I have to add shoe covers. If the head and feet get cold you get cold. Then to me 30 to 40 degrees are cold. Less than freezing and we are talking hot chocolate and a fireplace.
Robert Foster is offline  
Old 11-17-10, 04:09 PM
  #58  
cooker
Prefers Cicero
 
cooker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Toronto
Posts: 12,847

Bikes: 1984 Trek 520; 2007 Bike Friday NWT; misc others

Mentioned: 86 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3922 Post(s)
Liked 92 Times in 76 Posts
Rode home in heavy rain and strong gusts with the temperature at about 5C (40 F) last night. I had winter ski mitts, a cape, a flannel jacket, and a polyester or lycra earband under my helmet.

The head band and jacket worked fine. Some rain got in the helmet vents to my scalp, but not enough to bother me.

The mitts were my biggest worry - once they get soaked they lose all insulation, but these ones held up well, and although they looked drenched, they were reasonably dry inside right to the end of the ride. However if it were any longer a ride, they wouldn't have stayed dry inside. In fact they were soaked inside this a.m., as the moisture that got into the outer layers, had perfused throughout during the night.

Although the cape covers my upper body, the gusts caused it to flap up enough that my thighs got a bit damp, and even with fenders my lower legs, shoes and socks got soaked. My feet were pretty cold at the end.

So those are my two hardest parts to keep dry and warm - hands and feet.
cooker is offline  
Old 11-17-10, 04:13 PM
  #59  
zeppinger
Senior Member
 
zeppinger's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 2,014

Bikes: Giant FCR3, Surly LHT

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
The cape is not as well suited to cold rain as it is warm rain. In cold rain, for long rides, I wear waterproof jacket, pants, and gaitors. To avoid getting wet inside the suit I ride slow. Just leave your house a littler earlier than normal. Also, a shower cap works well over a helmet as a waterproofer and insulator.
zeppinger is offline  
Old 11-17-10, 05:36 PM
  #60  
wahoonc
Membership Not Required
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Posts: 16,855

Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 9 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by zeppinger View Post
The cape is not as well suited to cold rain as it is warm rain. In cold rain, for long rides, I wear waterproof jacket, pants, and gaitors. To avoid getting wet inside the suit I ride slow. Just leave your house a littler earlier than normal. Also, a shower cap works well over a helmet as a waterproofer and insulator.
Wet and cold? I still use the cape, just have plenty of wool on underneath it.

Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
wahoonc is offline  
Old 11-18-10, 06:59 AM
  #61  
Pedaleur
Je pose, donc je suis.
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Back. Here.
Posts: 2,898
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Robert Foster View Post
I hope you notice I don't "live" in either city?
Southern California?!?!? What are _you_ doing on a 'cycling in the rain' thread? ;-)
Pedaleur is offline  
Old 11-18-10, 12:29 PM
  #62  
Robert Foster
Banned.
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Southern california
Posts: 3,498

Bikes: Lapierre CF Sensium 400. Jamis Ventura Sport. Trek 800. Giant Cypress.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Pedaleur View Post
Southern California?!?!? What are _you_ doing on a 'cycling in the rain' thread? ;-)
I know, sometimes I feel guilty. But with the miles I have been putting in over the last two years sooner or later I am bound to get caught in a heavy mist.

Still I have considered not staying home on the few days we do get rain and have been considering a rain jacket and some kind of foot covers to use with my MTB and Backup road bike.
Robert Foster is offline  
Old 11-29-10, 05:07 AM
  #63  
Bike Gremlin
Mostly harmless ™
 
Bike Gremlin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Novi Sad
Posts: 4,221

Bikes: Custom made on Scott Speedster frame, Custom made on a 1996. steel MTB frame (all but frame changed at least once in the past 20 years).

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1008 Post(s)
Liked 65 Times in 48 Posts
Originally Posted by Porteño View Post
But what about those of us riding to work, or who have to go to work meetings (or in my case - I am a journalist- do interviews)? It is one thing to ride in civilian clothes and get a bit sweaty, nothing an inconspicuous spare shirt rolled into my bag and one minute in any toilet cannot handle, but arriving in a soaking, muddy, sweaty mess in conditions nothing short of a full bath and new change of clothes will repair is just not an option on a working day... Weekend/fitness rides are a different beast, sure, but I still haven't found clothes I can ride in on a rainy day that still make me look some kind of business casual without 15 minutes in a changing room.

Plus, I don't know about where you live, but biking in a busy, bike-unfriendly city in the rain (Buenos Aires, Argentina, in my case) can get pretty unsafe: most of my close calls with cars have been on rainy days, when they ride more dangerously, the traffic is heavier and my handling/braking on the bike is affected by more slippery streets, puddles and the like. I do most of my riding in busy/downtown areas without bike lanes, which only makes matters worse.

I don't own a car and hate buses/subways, but in those days I suck it up and ride public transport...

If you don't have a changing room, that is a problem. No need to shower, just change clothes and use a small towel. But you doo need a changing room and a place to let the clothes dry.
Bike Gremlin is offline  
Old 11-29-10, 05:45 AM
  #64  
cyclezealot
Senior Member
 
cyclezealot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Fallbrook,Calif./Palau del Vidre, France
Posts: 13,217

Bikes: Klein QP, Fuji touring, Surly Cross Check, BCH City bike

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1475 Post(s)
Liked 71 Times in 63 Posts
I find rain suits leak at the seams.. Best luck is water proofed tights.. Plus they breath better . During the rainy winter.. That sure makes Arizona not seem so bad..
__________________
Pray for the Dead and Fight like Hell for the Living










^ Since January 1, 2012
cyclezealot is offline  
Old 11-29-10, 11:41 AM
  #65  
slide23
Senior Member
 
slide23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 128
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Pedaleur View Post
Wow, are you clueless.
Well, not really. Unless there is some underlying contributing condition to chilblains, riding in the cold above freezing is merely uncomfortable.
slide23 is offline  
Old 11-29-10, 02:03 PM
  #66  
myrridin
Banned.
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,325
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by slide23 View Post
Well, not really. Unless there is some underlying contributing condition to chilblains, riding in the cold above freezing is merely uncomfortable.
I suggest you do some research on hypothermia. It doesn't require freezing temperatures. And getting wet (from rain) can accelerate the onset.
myrridin is offline  
Old 11-29-10, 05:19 PM
  #67  
Roody
Sophomoric Member
 
Roody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Dancing in Lansing
Posts: 24,221
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 711 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by myrridin View Post
I suggest you do some research on hypothermia. It doesn't require freezing temperatures. And getting wet (from rain) can accelerate the onset.
You're technically right, but have you ever heard of a fit, non-demented adult getting hypothermia while riding around town?
__________________

"Think Outside the Cage"
Roody is offline  
Old 11-30-10, 08:56 AM
  #68  
slide23
Senior Member
 
slide23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 128
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by myrridin View Post
I suggest you do some research on hypothermia. It doesn't require freezing temperatures. And getting wet (from rain) can accelerate the onset.
Actually I have. I used to work in medical software development, and as such I have access to a lot of medical research databases. There has been, in my searches, no occurrence of healthy, active adults developing hypothermia while performing aerobic activity. Is there evidence of this occurring? Maybe, but I have not found it.

I know from my own experience and experiments that wearing minimal cover, above freezing, maintaining heart rate at or above 110 BPM, temps 32F and up, rainy and wet, 36 mile commute each way... no hypothermia. Hands and feet get a little achey, but that is it.

Everybody's relative climatic stress is different, but it's my opinion that most people would be quite surprised if they just gave it a try.
slide23 is offline  
Old 11-30-10, 11:56 AM
  #69  
Bruzer
Bicyclist
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 97

Bikes: The two wheeled variety.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
After sixty eight posts and no one mentioned the wear and tear on the equipment.

Moving parts can let water in more than a bicycle that is just getting rained on. I was on two bike tours this year where we had one full day of rain each tour. After taking apart my hubs the ball bearings were in a brown rusty grease that pitted one of my cones. Shimano does not have any extra stock of that particular cone, and I have to wait 4 months until the back order is filled.

Flat tires on one tour increased so dramatically the support people ran out of tubes. Wet tires tend to keep objects stuck to them longer and tires tend to puncture more often in wet conditions. Changing a tire in the pouring rain is not a fun task.

Wear and tear alone is not enough to keep me from riding in the rain, but I would be lying if it did not influence my thought process. Higher wear and tear on parts is something you will have to deal with when riding in the rain and should be discussed as well as clothing.
Bruzer is offline  
Old 12-01-10, 01:03 AM
  #70  
spinninwheels
aspiring island dweller
 
spinninwheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: island off of an island
Posts: 267

Bikes: Easy Racers GRR, Cannondale T-2000/Rohloff Custom, Cannondale R-700, Custom Fixie/Single Speed, Santa Cruz

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Bruzer View Post
After sixty eight posts and no one mentioned the wear and tear on the equipment.

Moving parts can let water in more than a bicycle that is just getting rained on. I was on two bike tours this year where we had one full day of rain each tour. After taking apart my hubs the ball bearings were in a brown rusty grease that pitted one of my cones. Shimano does not have any extra stock of that particular cone, and I have to wait 4 months until the back order is filled.

Flat tires on one tour increased so dramatically the support people ran out of tubes. Wet tires tend to keep objects stuck to them longer and tires tend to puncture more often in wet conditions. Changing a tire in the pouring rain is not a fun task.

Wear and tear alone is not enough to keep me from riding in the rain, but I would be lying if it did not influence my thought process. Higher wear and tear on parts is something you will have to deal with when riding in the rain and should be discussed as well as clothing.
Agreed on the wear and tear on the moving parts. The rain was the main reason for buying a Rohloff and swapping the fork and putting a disc brake on my commuting/touring bike. I was going through a set of rims about every two years and replacing cassettes almost as frequently.

Since the Rohloff and disc brake were installed, wear and tear is a fraction of what it was. I've got about 20,000 km on the wheels (back one is still a rim brake) and there is lots of life left in them.

As for changing a tire in the rain, I lived in Vancouver for six years and only changed a flat in the rain once.
__________________
Life is either a wild adventure or nothing - Helen Keller
spinninwheels is offline  
Old 12-01-10, 01:34 AM
  #71  
bragi
bragi
 
bragi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: seattle, WA
Posts: 2,911

Bikes: LHT

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Bruzer View Post
Wear and tear alone is not enough to keep me from riding in the rain, but I would be lying if it did not influence my thought process. Higher wear and tear on parts is something you will have to deal with when riding in the rain and should be discussed as well as clothing.

I also agree that wear and tear in the winter is far more severe than during nice weather. However, it's still a lot less expensive than driving a car. And very regular maintenance & cleaning can lengthen the life of many components. In winter, I clean my rims and drive train about once a week. I still have to replace my rims every 18-24 months, get a new cassette every 24 months, a new chain every 6-12 months, and new brake pads every 3-4 months, but if I didn't do the weekly cleaning it would be even more often. I consider this a small price to pay in exchange for the benefits that a mostly car-free life provides, along with the greater feeling of control that comes with managing a much simpler, more elegant machine.
bragi is offline  
Old 12-01-10, 04:01 AM
  #72  
wahoonc
Membership Not Required
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Posts: 16,855

Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 9 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by Bruzer View Post
After sixty eight posts and no one mentioned the wear and tear on the equipment.

Moving parts can let water in more than a bicycle that is just getting rained on. I was on two bike tours this year where we had one full day of rain each tour. After taking apart my hubs the ball bearings were in a brown rusty grease that pitted one of my cones. Shimano does not have any extra stock of that particular cone, and I have to wait 4 months until the back order is filled.

Flat tires on one tour increased so dramatically the support people ran out of tubes. Wet tires tend to keep objects stuck to them longer and tires tend to puncture more often in wet conditions. Changing a tire in the pouring rain is not a fun task.

Wear and tear alone is not enough to keep me from riding in the rain, but I would be lying if it did not influence my thought process. Higher wear and tear on parts is something you will have to deal with when riding in the rain and should be discussed as well as clothing.
Wear and tear is part of normal use and I am sure it does increase some during wet weather. This is one of the reasons my bikes have fenders and chain cases and guards as well as using IG hubs. I use the marine type (boat trailer) waterproof grease in my wheels, headset and bottom bracket and have never had a problem.

Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
wahoonc is offline  
Old 12-01-10, 12:59 PM
  #73  
Roody
Sophomoric Member
 
Roody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Dancing in Lansing
Posts: 24,221
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 711 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by wahoonc View Post
Wear and tear is part of normal use and I am sure it does increase some during wet weather. This is one of the reasons my bikes have fenders and chain cases and guards as well as using IG hubs. I use the marine type (boat trailer) waterproof grease in my wheels, headset and bottom bracket and have never had a problem.

Aaron
Yeah. If somebody's bike (or your body) is so fancy that it can't stand to get a little rain on it, I suggest they reconsider the whole utility cycling option. Zheesh, take a bus if a little rain scares you.
__________________

"Think Outside the Cage"
Roody is offline  
Old 12-01-10, 08:16 PM
  #74  
gerv 
In the right lane
 
gerv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Des Moines
Posts: 9,565

Bikes: 1974 Huffy 3 speed

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 43 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by bragi View Post
In winter, I clean my rims and drive train about once a week. I still have to replace my rims every 18-24 months, get a new cassette every 24 months, a new chain every 6-12 months, and new brake pads every 3-4 months, but if I didn't do the weekly cleaning it would be even more often.
That's pretty often for a rim change. Maybe I should send you my address and you forward me your old rims.

I agree about the cassette. If I get 4000 miles out of a cassette, it's toast...

New brake pads? Every 2000 - 3000 miles.
gerv is offline  
Old 12-01-10, 09:48 PM
  #75  
spinninwheels
aspiring island dweller
 
spinninwheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: island off of an island
Posts: 267

Bikes: Easy Racers GRR, Cannondale T-2000/Rohloff Custom, Cannondale R-700, Custom Fixie/Single Speed, Santa Cruz

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by gerv View Post
That's pretty often for a rim change...
Not necessarily. The grit that's present on the road that gets thrown up onto the rims (especially the rear rim) is nasty. Add a few steep hills, Wet Coast Style, ten thousand km or so, and that's a recipe for rim replacement.
__________________
Life is either a wild adventure or nothing - Helen Keller
spinninwheels is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.