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You got your Tesla and inherited grandpa's Hetchin. Now what?

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You got your Tesla and inherited grandpa's Hetchin. Now what?

Old 01-27-23, 02:15 AM
  #26  
merziac
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Originally Posted by AdventureManCO
OP, I like the bike, I like the artistic impressions in the lugs. I'm struggling to see how it's best place is the C&V subforum. It is not vintage, and I'm having a hard time viewing anything 3D printed/sintered and glued up together as classic. I know there were various similarly constructed bikes that now fall in the 'C&V' category, but this one is a bit further removed from it. Are you the manufacturer, or do you work for the manufacturer? If anything, this would make a good post in the Road Cycling subforum, and would be even more valuable with full shots of the bike and some actual riding impressions.
And with 200+ hours of work in each frame, apparently unlimited tech, time, money and resources they could have produced a heck of a steel frame if they only knew how.
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Old 01-27-23, 03:18 AM
  #27  
RiddleOfSteel
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I don't mind lugged carbon as we saw that plenty in the '80s, albeit with aluminum lugs. Jamis' Eclipse had 853 lugs and lug-tubes with carbon tubes for a few years. I'd like to ride one of those. This titanium-lugged carbon frame does the C&V = lugs (if not also straight tubes) thing, which gives it a pass in my book. What bums me out with the above is that the lugs are simplistic. All the continued hyperventilating about 3D printed stuff and it looks 1) like cast metal with zero filing, sanding, or finishing 2) boring, as I stated before. No flare, no fun, and then reflective metal decals that add a little interest but are otherwise extraneous. Making the lugs black like the rest of the whole bike is also a fail in my book if one is trying to show off the technology/feature. But hey, I should pay "if you have to ask" money to not be able to see how this most recent limited edition model (the ArchAngel) is special.

Now, since I can employ a search engine, I went to Bastion's site and was treated to a plethora of gorgeously finished bikes with these same lugs polished (or painted) to a beautiful shine. Some killer carbon work and tinted clear coat jobs. This is some freaking sweet stuff. Lugs still need to be more fun IMO, but it's like the ultimate form of the late-'80s Specialized Epic Allez. If I had [chuck] you money and worked with them on a more traditionally angled (top tube) 65cm version with clearance for 33mm tires, that would be a lot of fun.

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Old 01-27-23, 10:36 AM
  #28  
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I really like the way Bastion bikes look, but tbh I'd rather have a production carbon bike. Plus I just can't get over the stem failure at the Olympics. It always bothered me that they thought being automotive engineers was some kind of a special qualification. Maybe if they worked in F1. In general, automotive engineers are in the business of making things cheaper and hope they don't fail under warranty.
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Old 01-27-23, 01:41 PM
  #29  
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^ Without straying from the thread focus, you as a hands on craftsman type should be analytical. Ben Serotta had to lick his wounds after his many breaking steel framed provided to team 7-Eleven. This was due rushed unproven tubing from Tru Temper. Sponsor recognition, representation on world stage cycling was pushed by Tru Temper.

The Bastion issue during a team pursuit event at Tokyo was rather similar. Like Serotta was back when, Bastion is a specialty builder, relatively new. The bar design came from specs by another company from Canada. They were inadequate for custom build bars. Additionally was the failure to conduct adequate fatigue testing.

The 3D-printed base bar was originally ordered put in as an order for manufacture late in 2019, with the flat bar thought to offer an advantageous starting position for the team pursuit squad. With the shortened period until the 2020 Olympics, there was a reduced testing procedure from what is normal for design and manufacture of the new handlebar set up, down from the normal 200,000 cycles down to 50,000. The bar was subject to 1.5 times the max static load specified by the design brief.

OK, enough on that. I've nothing to do with the company but respect and appreciate those with skill sets, engineering, technology and whom can apply with aesthetic and artistic value.
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Old 01-27-23, 02:04 PM
  #30  
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$12,000 for the Cross Road frame
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Old 01-27-23, 02:40 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by smd4
Those aren't lugs. They're metalic decals.

This thread has no place here.
There's so much wrong in your statement, but I won't stoop to your level.
Anyways, I guess your knowledge and observation of classic bikes with metallic decals makes you the expert commentator.

Originally Posted by icemilkcoffee
On the one hand it looks very nice. But on the other hand- does this Ti lug serve any purpose aside from decorative? Keep in mind that back in the classic era, lugs weren't there to just look pretty- they served a definite purpose in strengthening the joints. The carvings in the lugs served to thin the edges and carve out the middle to lighten the lugs. So it wasn't solely decorative.
I think craftsmen today should focus on custom paint instead of non-functional add-ons. A custom painted carbon frame will set your bike apart from the ocean of black bikes. Whereas this bike, as nice as the detailing is, just gets lost with the other bazillion black carbon bikes.
Murphy brothers Columbine bikes were all about performance. Okay, now....

Originally Posted by The Thin Man
It's spelled, Hetchins. With an "s", ya goon.

Moderators, please remove this original post. It is not related to anything classic, nor vintage.

If Alf were around, he'd likely correct you.


------

Originally Posted by merziac
And with 200+ hours of work in each frame, apparently unlimited tech, time, money and resources they could have produced a heck of a steel frame if they only knew how.
Your emojis could have saved YOU all the TIME typing.
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Old 01-27-23, 02:49 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by chain_whipped
Your emojis could have saved YOU all the TIME typing.
Where's the fun in that?
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Old 01-29-23, 11:21 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by icemilkcoffee
On the one hand it looks very nice. But on the other hand- does this Ti lug serve any purpose aside from decorative?
I agree on this. It's not the way to make the most efficient carbon bike. But it is pretty and will appeal to those who like the more "traditional" manufacturing technique or want a carbon bike with custom geometry. I've seen one of these Bastions close up and it was a work of art. But not something I would be particularly interested in riding.
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Old 01-29-23, 11:28 AM
  #34  
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So is this thread about the last Bastion of lugged crabon fiber frames??
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