Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Have you ever ridden a Confente?

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Have you ever ridden a Confente?

Old 09-26-22, 06:19 PM
  #76  
SurferRosa
SeŮor Member
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Pac NW
Posts: 6,353

Bikes: Old school lightweights

Mentioned: 76 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2665 Post(s)
Liked 3,765 Times in 2,001 Posts
Have you never been mellow?
SurferRosa is online now  
Old 09-26-22, 07:57 PM
  #77  
Kabuki12
Senior Member
 
Kabuki12's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Ventura County ,California
Posts: 2,643

Bikes: 71 Stella,72 Mondia Special,72 ItalVega Grand Rallye, 73 Windsor Pro,75 Colnago Super,76 Kabuki DF,77 Raleigh Comp.GS,78 Raleigh Pro,80 Moto Gran Sprint,82 Medici Pro Strada

Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 627 Post(s)
Liked 1,429 Times in 842 Posts
Originally Posted by SurferRosa View Post
Have you never been mellow?
mellow yellow on my orange Medici!
Kabuki12 is offline  
Likes For Kabuki12:
Old 09-27-22, 05:54 AM
  #78  
RWHowe
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 25
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 17 Times in 5 Posts
Yes, I have owned and ridden a Confente and a Masi built by Mario for Irene Ferrari. To me, vintage bikes are a bit like vintage cars, an older MG might be fun to drive for a while but it does not compare to a modern Porsche!

On the translate function, the original sentence is "His mechanical aptitude soon captured the attention of a family friend, Mr. Tiberghien, who gave Mario a job in his wool factory. Mario worked as a mechanic and often repaired the looms."
RWHowe is offline  
Old 09-27-22, 06:31 AM
  #79  
Kabuki12
Senior Member
 
Kabuki12's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Ventura County ,California
Posts: 2,643

Bikes: 71 Stella,72 Mondia Special,72 ItalVega Grand Rallye, 73 Windsor Pro,75 Colnago Super,76 Kabuki DF,77 Raleigh Comp.GS,78 Raleigh Pro,80 Moto Gran Sprint,82 Medici Pro Strada

Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 627 Post(s)
Liked 1,429 Times in 842 Posts
Originally Posted by RWHowe View Post
Yes, I have owned and ridden a Confente and a Masi built by Mario for Irene Ferrari. To me, vintage bikes are a bit like vintage cars, an older MG might be fun to drive for a while but it does not compare to a modern Porsche!

On the translate function, the original sentence is "His mechanical aptitude soon captured the attention of a family friend, Mr. Tiberghien, who gave Mario a job in his wool factory. Mario worked as a mechanic and often repaired the looms."
It is personal taste , I suppose . I drove a 1957 356A for 26 years and never had the urge to drive a more modern Porsche. I ride the same lugged steel bikes that I rode and lusted after when I was in my twenties and they were new. I ride with some guys that have nice modern carbon fiber bikes and I have no desire to "upgrade" ......YET!
Kabuki12 is offline  
Likes For Kabuki12:
Old 09-27-22, 07:10 AM
  #80  
mhespenheide
Full Member
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Burien WA
Posts: 268

Bikes: Cannondale Synapse, LeMond Victoire, Bianchi Campione d'Italia, Kona Hei Hei, Ritchey Ultra, Schwinn "Paramount" PDG, '83 Trek 640

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 114 Post(s)
Liked 103 Times in 76 Posts
Originally Posted by Andy_K View Post
My Chrome browser translated it very well as far as I can tell (except a bit about Confente building looms from 1968 to 1970). Very interesting information. Thanks for sharing.

To the point I made earlier about custom frames, the article quotes Confente himself thusly: "A frame must come out perfect from every point of view. You can't go wrong even half a centimeter. The riders would notice it immediately and my seriousness would go away. So maximum perfection. The frames must be precise. They must correspond to the measurements of the length of the legs, body and arms."

Of course, this must also be tempered with what Brian Baylis said about frame builders understanding things that the rest of us don't, so I'm sure there is much that I'm missing beyond this point.
If the standard of excellence is being accurate to a half-centimeter, I'm quite sure many builders today can meet that!
mhespenheide is offline  
Likes For mhespenheide:
Old 09-27-22, 07:18 AM
  #81  
repechage
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 17,994
Mentioned: 121 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2618 Post(s)
Liked 1,621 Times in 1,198 Posts
Originally Posted by RWHowe View Post
Yes, I have owned and ridden a Confente and a Masi built by Mario for Irene Ferrari. To me, vintage bikes are a bit like vintage cars, an older MG might be fun to drive for a while but it does not compare to a modern Porsche!

On the translate function, the original sentence is "His mechanical aptitude soon captured the attention of a family friend, Mr. Tiberghien, who gave Mario a job in his wool factory. Mario worked as a mechanic and often repaired the looms."
The Irene Ferrari frame is darn light.
was dangled in front of me at one point soliciting an offer, no extra silly money at the time. I did not make an offer.

thanks for the better translation.

As to air cooled flat six cars, I started with a Corvair. The American Porsche.
repechage is offline  
Old 09-27-22, 07:54 AM
  #82  
smd4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 2,075

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Supercorsa

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1216 Post(s)
Liked 885 Times in 583 Posts
I guess for 1977 they looked pretty nice. Could do without the soup-can cable guides, but I guess back then, they were better than the three chromed band-type guides. Flat fork crowns? No thanks.

The lugs are nice, but no chrome? No braze-on front derailleur mounts?

Again, for 1977, maybe these frames were the shiz, but certainly not the pinnacle of steel frame design/execution, IMO. That three-toned blue one Steve in Peoria posted looks pretty nice, but the others? Meh.
smd4 is online now  
Old 09-27-22, 08:12 AM
  #83  
repechage
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 17,994
Mentioned: 121 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2618 Post(s)
Liked 1,621 Times in 1,198 Posts
Originally Posted by smd4 View Post
I guess for 1977 they looked pretty nice. Could do without the soup-can cable guides, but I guess back then, they were better than the three chromed band-type guides. Flat fork crowns? No thanks.

The lugs are nice, but no chrome? No braze-on front derailleur mounts?

Again, for 1977, maybe these frames were the shiz, but certainly not the pinnacle of steel frame design/execution, IMO. That three-toned blue one Steve in Peoria posted looks pretty nice, but the others? Meh.
braze on front derailleur mounts as a production item were years away.
Confente did explore a direct mount front mechanism. A custom cast chassis to replace the band clamp affair - mounting with what appeared to be two waterbottle bosses. Near the end, maybe only on one bike.

the rest of your post really need to be revised for clarity after some more coffee. "Soup can cable guides"?

you might also review more as what was available in 1977. My guess before your time and or awareness.
repechage is offline  
Old 09-27-22, 08:15 AM
  #84  
smd4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 2,075

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Supercorsa

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1216 Post(s)
Liked 885 Times in 583 Posts
Originally Posted by repechage View Post
braze on front derailleur mounts as a production item were years away.
Confente did explore a direct mount front mechanism. A custom cast chassis to replace the band clamp affair - mounting with what appeared to be two waterbottle bosses. Near the end, maybe only on one bike.

the rest of your post really need to be revised for clarity after some more coffee. "Soup can cable guides"?

you might also review more as what was available in 1977. My guess before your time and or awareness.
Yes--the top tube cable guides look like tiny soup cans. Or cut-down .22 casings. Nothing elegant, in my book.

Definitely before my time, for sure. But I still see nothing special in the design or execution. I suspect it rides just like any other high-quality steel bike of the time.
smd4 is online now  
Old 09-27-22, 09:00 AM
  #85  
Doug Fattic 
framebuilder
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Niles, Michigan
Posts: 1,295
Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 531 Post(s)
Liked 1,477 Times in 525 Posts
I think it is necessary to evaluate Confente’s work in the context of when he built frames. European frames in the 60’s and 70’s had to be made fast in order to meet the cheap market that would buy them. I visited a lot of builders in the UK and Italy in my quest to learn in the 70’s and there was no magnificence there. In order to be able to sell a painted frame for $100 or so, that required a build time of only a day. When I look at my 1972 Italian Masi (I paid $350 for the complete Campy equipped bike), I am really impressed how nicely it was made. It isn’t fair to compare Mario’s 70’s work to what I and my colleagues can build in 100 hours today.

I was introduced to a Confente bicycle by my cousin that ran Rain Cross Cycerly in Riverside CA in 1976. The feature I saw that I had never seen before was recessed brake mounts. That was the beginning of the end of using a nut that stuck out beyond the fork or brake bridge. I don’t know if he invented the idea but that is the 1st time I ever saw it done.

Another feature of Confente’s compared to us contemporary Americans that started in the 70’s was that his graphics were refined. He essentially modified what Masi was doing but the end effect was really good.There was no known place in the States that understood what bicycle decals should look like, like there was in the UK. Eventually that problem was solved but not before some ugly graphics were used on American made frames in the 70’s.
Doug Fattic is offline  
Likes For Doug Fattic:
Old 09-27-22, 09:04 AM
  #86  
cudak888 
www.theheadbadge.com
 
cudak888's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Southern Florida
Posts: 27,434

Bikes: https://www.theheadbadge.com

Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1881 Post(s)
Liked 2,645 Times in 1,420 Posts
Originally Posted by mhespenheide View Post
If the standard of excellence is being accurate to a half-centimeter, I'm quite sure many builders today can meet that!
Mario's comment isn't too outlandish, in the context of general frame alignment (not mitering) of the average lugged steel bike of the time.

Many production frames of this period were assembled and shipped without any post-build alignment check. It was more common to find a rear triangle delivered out of whack than not. Back then, lots of shops who took pride in what they sold would send production bikes straight from the box onto the alignment table for a check and cold-setting if necessary.

At this point, every steel frame that rolls through my shop that happens to have the BB off for any reason will get the rear triangle checked. More often then not, they need a bit of tweaking and are off as much as the 5mm that Mario mentions.

-Kurt
__________________







cudak888 is offline  
Old 09-27-22, 09:08 AM
  #87  
cudak888 
www.theheadbadge.com
 
cudak888's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Southern Florida
Posts: 27,434

Bikes: https://www.theheadbadge.com

Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1881 Post(s)
Liked 2,645 Times in 1,420 Posts
Originally Posted by Doug Fattic View Post
Another feature of Confente’s compared to us contemporary Americans that started in the 70’s was that his graphics were refined. He essentially modified what Masi was doing but the end effect was really good.There was no known place in the States that understood what bicycle decals should look like, like there was in the UK. Eventually that problem was solved but not before some ugly graphics were used on American made frames in the 70’s.
Not to mention that the frame finishes in the period pictures and unrestored examples indicate that Confentes had a significantly better paint jobs than most other bikes of the period.

In the context of the 1970's - with no internet to see what anyone else was up to throughout the US other than various B&W bike magazines and the trade shows - it's easy to see Confente's work stirring up a lot of interest, especially regionally.

-Kurt
__________________








Last edited by cudak888; 09-27-22 at 09:14 AM.
cudak888 is offline  
Old 09-27-22, 09:09 AM
  #88  
KonAaron Snake 
Fat Guy on a Little Bike
 
KonAaron Snake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 17,222

Bikes: Two wheeled ones

Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1252 Post(s)
Liked 326 Times in 167 Posts
Originally Posted by Drillium Dude View Post
Nope, but this is pretty much the same thing and the ride is freakin' amazing:





DD
Errrrrrrrrrrr...that's like the least Confente like bike

If there was an anti-confente, that's it!

I did ride one. It was a bike. I think getting a custom bike built for someone else is often problematic if you're expecting bespoke ride. Confente was a talented builder I'm sure, but like a lot of this stuff, it's really branding and mythology. There are bikes I'd rather have to be honest, and which i consider more special.

A lot of people crap on things they don't appreciate, or can't afford...like those saying "oh that famous Michelin three star is nothing special"; it happens here too. I don't want to be one of those people about confente...and sure, if one came around at 2k, I'd buy it to have it. That said, there are other builders I find more appealing, and I generally prefer east coast builders on principle

Last edited by KonAaron Snake; 09-27-22 at 09:22 AM.
KonAaron Snake is offline  
Likes For KonAaron Snake:
Old 09-27-22, 09:17 AM
  #89  
smd4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 2,075

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Supercorsa

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1216 Post(s)
Liked 885 Times in 583 Posts
Originally Posted by Doug Fattic View Post
I think it is necessary to evaluate Confente’s work in the context of when he built frames. European frames in the 60’s and 70’s had to be made fast in order to meet the cheap market that would buy them. I visited a lot of builders in the UK and Italy in my quest to learn in the 70’s and there was no magnificence there. In order to be able to sell a painted frame for $100 or so, that required a build time of only a day.
I don't know. The Supercorsas I've seen from the 70s had chrome lugs, fork crowns, and sometime stays or forks. If you tell me a frame like this could be built, chromed, and painted in a day, I certainly cannot argue with you. But those bikes seem to me more refined (except for details like the recessed brake bolts). Sloping fork crowns; fastback seat stays; generous chrome...

I get that Confentes have their loyal following. For the most part, except for the occasional detail, they look pretty much like any other steel bikes of the time...to me.
smd4 is online now  
Old 09-27-22, 09:17 AM
  #90  
himespau 
Senior Member
 
himespau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 13,038
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3546 Post(s)
Liked 2,320 Times in 1,376 Posts
Originally Posted by Drillium Dude View Post
Here's an interesting take on the mystique that surrounds MC to this day; keep in mind, what follows are the musings of a framebuilder, and a highly-regarded one at that.

Quote: " If all frames were purchased strictly on the quality of whatís there and nothing else and the price was relative to that, Mario would not make the top ten with absolute certainty. "

(Brian Baylis, 27 June 2002)

DD
I wonder where Baylis would have ranked his own frames.
himespau is offline  
Old 09-27-22, 09:17 AM
  #91  
RWHowe
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 25
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 17 Times in 5 Posts
Confente's graphics

Mario's graphics were designed by Federico Ferrari. "Fred" was an older Italian gentleman living in LA. He became friends with Mario. When Mario was preparing to leave Masi, Fred designed his graphics.
Fred was a graphic designer by trade and he painted as well. I saw a few of his oil paintings in his home and they were quire nice.

Originally Posted by Doug Fattic View Post
I think it is necessary to evaluate Confenteís work in the context of when he built frames. European frames in the 60ís and 70ís had to be made fast in order to meet the cheap market that would buy them. I visited a lot of builders in the UK and Italy in my quest to learn in the 70ís and there was no magnificence there. In order to be able to sell a painted frame for $100 or so, that required a build time of only a day. When I look at my 1972 Italian Masi (I paid $350 for the complete Campy equipped bike), I am really impressed how nicely it was made. It isnít fair to compare Marioís 70ís work to what I and my colleagues can build in 100 hours today.

I was introduced to a Confente bicycle by my cousin that ran Rain Cross Cycerly in Riverside CA in 1976. The feature I saw that I had never seen before was recessed brake mounts. That was the beginning of the end of using a nut that stuck out beyond the fork or brake bridge. I donít know if he invented the idea but that is the 1st time I ever saw it done.

Another feature of Confenteís compared to us contemporary Americans that started in the 70ís was that his graphics were refined. He essentially modified what Masi was doing but the end effect was really good.There was no known place in the States that understood what bicycle decals should look like, like there was in the UK. Eventually that problem was solved but not before some ugly graphics were used on American made frames in the 70ís.
RWHowe is offline  
Likes For RWHowe:
Old 09-27-22, 09:22 AM
  #92  
seypat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 7,625
Mentioned: 66 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2623 Post(s)
Liked 1,752 Times in 1,110 Posts
I did ride one. It was a bike. I think getting a custom bike built for someone else is often problematic if you're expecting bespoke ride. Confente was a talented builder I'm sure, but like a lot of this stuff, it's really branding and mythology.
This is probably the best answer. Take away the cosmetic accents/decals/branding and you may not be able to distinquish it from the other brands in a blind ride test. Heck, you might not even be able to pick it out amongst the top brands from other countries either.
seypat is offline  
Likes For seypat:
Old 09-27-22, 09:23 AM
  #93  
KonAaron Snake 
Fat Guy on a Little Bike
 
KonAaron Snake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 17,222

Bikes: Two wheeled ones

Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1252 Post(s)
Liked 326 Times in 167 Posts
Originally Posted by himespau View Post
I wonder where Baylis would have ranked his own frames.
I tend to consider the person along with the frame...so that immediately drops them for me.
KonAaron Snake is offline  
Old 09-27-22, 09:26 AM
  #94  
KonAaron Snake 
Fat Guy on a Little Bike
 
KonAaron Snake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 17,222

Bikes: Two wheeled ones

Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1252 Post(s)
Liked 326 Times in 167 Posts
90 post thread - already - and probably no more than 2-3 people on it own one, and a few more rode one once. That's the power of Confente.

I make a post about Bill Boston - maybe I get two replies.

FWIW - my favorite frame builder is Hanford Cycles - because he's a great dude who makes nice bikes.
KonAaron Snake is offline  
Likes For KonAaron Snake:
Old 09-27-22, 09:41 AM
  #95  
seypat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 7,625
Mentioned: 66 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2623 Post(s)
Liked 1,752 Times in 1,110 Posts
The dude died relatively early into his frame making/business career. Never had a chance to show long term success or failure. He's remembered as the young Elvis everyone loved and adored instead of the Elvis portrayed in the movie Bubba Ho Tep. It could have went either way.

Last edited by seypat; 09-27-22 at 11:31 AM.
seypat is offline  
Likes For seypat:
Old 09-27-22, 10:05 AM
  #96  
KonAaron Snake 
Fat Guy on a Little Bike
 
KonAaron Snake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 17,222

Bikes: Two wheeled ones

Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1252 Post(s)
Liked 326 Times in 167 Posts
Originally Posted by seypat View Post
The dude died relatively early into his frame making/busness career. Never had a chance to show long term success or failure. He's remembered as the young Elvis everyone loved and adored instead of the Elvis portrayed in the movie Bubba Ho Tep. It could have went either way.
Can you imagine how weíd remember Belushi had he lived longer? Or cobain? Or Morrison?

Belushi would probably be viewed with all the fondness of Chevy Chase. We tend to lionize people who expire before they get to play all the roles.
KonAaron Snake is offline  
Likes For KonAaron Snake:
Old 09-27-22, 10:30 AM
  #97  
RWHowe
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 25
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 17 Times in 5 Posts
In the context of the times, the Velo-news newspaper was published monthly October to March and twice a month from April through September. You might learn about frame builders around the US from their ads in the back of Velo-news. Frame builders were very regional. I grew up in NJ. Bill Boston was known to build nice frames for tourists. I never saw a Bill Boston frame at a race. Guys I raced with rode bikes by Jim Redcay and Tom Kellogg. By the mid-80s, you might see a Sachs or Serotta. Never heard of Assenmacher or West coast builders till many years later.

I would argue that Mario transcended that and became a national name early on. Two of the biggest names in U.S. racing in that era, Jerry Ash and Boyer, rode his frames. It was a big deal to see Boyer on a Confente in the 1981 Sports Illustrated article, a feature piece as the first American to ride the TdF.

Ask anyone that attended the 1977 industry trade show in NYC what a big deal it was when Mario unveiled his frames.


Last edited by RWHowe; 09-27-22 at 11:14 AM.
RWHowe is offline  
Likes For RWHowe:
Old 09-27-22, 10:52 AM
  #98  
Andy_K 
Senior Member
 
Andy_K's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Beaverton, OR
Posts: 14,050

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 479 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2788 Post(s)
Liked 2,462 Times in 998 Posts
Originally Posted by mhespenheide View Post
If the standard of excellence is being accurate to a half-centimeter, I'm quite sure many builders today can meet that!
I took this to be referring to the geometry of the bike, vis a vis "the measurements of the length of the legs, body and arms." So my point was that the bike may indeed have been very special for the person for whom it was built, but it would likely be just another frame (in terms of ride quality) for someone with different proportions.
__________________
My Bikes
Andy_K is offline  
Likes For Andy_K:
Old 09-27-22, 10:56 AM
  #99  
cudak888 
www.theheadbadge.com
 
cudak888's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Southern Florida
Posts: 27,434

Bikes: https://www.theheadbadge.com

Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1881 Post(s)
Liked 2,645 Times in 1,420 Posts
Originally Posted by seypat View Post
The dude died relatively early into his frame making/busness career. Never had a chance to show long term success or failure. He's remembered as the young Elvis everyone loved and adored instead of the Elvis portrayed in the movie Bubba Ho Tep. It could have went either way.


-Kurt
__________________







cudak888 is offline  
Likes For cudak888:
Old 09-27-22, 11:22 AM
  #100  
repechage
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 17,994
Mentioned: 121 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2618 Post(s)
Liked 1,621 Times in 1,198 Posts
Originally Posted by smd4 View Post
Yes--the top tube cable guides look like tiny soup cans. Or cut-down .22 casings. Nothing elegant, in my book.

Definitely before my time, for sure. But I still see nothing special in the design or execution. I suspect it rides just like any other high-quality steel bike of the time.
a difference of opinion on the cable guides.
they DO require a casing that is not too thick.
I think that is a legitimate knock.

as I wrote much earlier- a Super Masi.
note this is of opinion, I have bikes I can Compare. Some might be attributed that Most Masi Carlsbad bikes were of Reynolds, Mario used Columbus.
repechage is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2022 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.