Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Continental 5000

Old 06-25-21, 07:58 AM
  #1  
nrsmd
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 79
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Continental 5000

This tire claims less rolling resistance than the 4000. Is it wishful thinking that the same energy I put out for both tires will translate to a higher speed (MPH) with the 5000 than with the 4000? In other words, is it worth moving up to these tires if increasing speed is my goal?
nrsmd is offline  
Old 06-25-21, 08:11 AM
  #2  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 13,124

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '88 Schwinn Premis , Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo

Mentioned: 104 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6064 Post(s)
Liked 3,224 Times in 1,863 Posts
Lower rolling resistance means less energy lost on tires rolling means faster speed.
Will you be able isolate the different and notice a few extra watts?...No idea. I cant, but maybe you are more in tune with your riding.
mstateglfr is offline  
Old 06-25-21, 08:17 AM
  #3  
AdkMtnMonster
Airplanes, bikes, beer.
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Off the front
Posts: 713

Bikes: Road bikes, mountain bikes, a gravel bike…

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 381 Post(s)
Liked 744 Times in 319 Posts
Marginal gains add up if enough if them can be strung together simultaneously. 4000 to 5000 is not likely to put you on the podium, but the 5000 is a nice riding tire. I thought it had less road vibration than the 4000,but I think it could have been my imagination.
AdkMtnMonster is offline  
Old 06-25-21, 08:27 AM
  #4  
ClydeClydeson
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 897
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 299 Post(s)
Liked 437 Times in 264 Posts
If the 4000 absorbs 10 watts at certain conditions, and the 5000 absorbs 9 watts at the same conditions, Conti can honestly report that the new tires have 10% less resistance, but you only have a net gain of 1 watt - you'll get better gains with an aero seatpost or by tying your shift cable housings together in front of the frame..

Remember that rolling resistance is only a tiny piece of the total resistance to movement, and is relatively tinier the faster you go.

Wait until your GP4000s are worn out before you change.
ClydeClydeson is offline  
Likes For ClydeClydeson:
Old 06-25-21, 08:43 AM
  #5  
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Left Coast, Canada
Posts: 5,021
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2156 Post(s)
Liked 1,236 Times in 670 Posts
+1 for the above.

I have GP 5000's. They replaced my 4000's when they wore out. I wouldn't switch one for the other before that. I just see it as the next gen of that series with whatever upgrade they've come up with in between but nothing earth shattering.
Happy Feet is offline  
Likes For Happy Feet:
Old 06-25-21, 09:22 AM
  #6  
bblair
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Posts: 224

Bikes: Lynskey R230, Trek 5200, 1975 Raleigh Pro, 1973 Falcon ,Trek T50 Tandem and a 1968 Paramount in progress.

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 92 Post(s)
Liked 98 Times in 69 Posts
From my extensive review of the literature, the marginal gains using optimum tire pressure, rolling resistance and aero rims, might, in ideal situations, get me to first in line at the rest stop porta-john. But if my rain jacket flaps too much, I'll have to find a tree.

It's getting kind of ridiculous for recreational riders, don't ya think?
bblair is offline  
Likes For bblair:
Old 06-25-21, 09:34 AM
  #7  
pickysoul
Junior Member
 
pickysoul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2021
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
GP 5000 gets puncture easilier than 4000. try Pirelli Pzero,dude.
pickysoul is offline  
Old 06-25-21, 10:40 AM
  #8  
Iride01
Hits [ENTER] b4 thinking
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 8,217

Bikes: '20 Tarmac Disc Comp '91, '78 Raleigh Competition GS

Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3237 Post(s)
Liked 1,831 Times in 1,299 Posts
Does Continental even make the 4000 any more? If you still find them, they are just NOS.

If you stock up on old stock, then you'll be living in the past longer when even better tires come out.
Iride01 is offline  
Old 06-25-21, 11:04 AM
  #9  
shelbyfv 
Senior Member
 
shelbyfv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: TN
Posts: 9,147
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2569 Post(s)
Liked 2,824 Times in 1,509 Posts
Originally Posted by pickysoul View Post
GP 5000 gets puncture easilier than 4000. try Pirelli Pzero,dude.
That's good to know, I was unaware. The 5000s seem true to size while the 4000s were often larger than nominal. Other than that, I can't tell a difference. Nice tires, both.
shelbyfv is offline  
Likes For shelbyfv:
Old 06-25-21, 11:11 AM
  #10  
AdkMtnMonster
Airplanes, bikes, beer.
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Off the front
Posts: 713

Bikes: Road bikes, mountain bikes, a gravel bike…

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 381 Post(s)
Liked 744 Times in 319 Posts
Originally Posted by pickysoul View Post
GP 5000 gets puncture easilier than 4000. try Pirelli Pzero,dude.
That’s laughablier untruly.

i have nearly 10k miles on a front GP5000 with zero flats, and I rode a rear all the way down to the cords last year with only one punch flat, which was 100% MY fault for nailing a smallish pothole @ ~54mph. 5000s are TOUGH meats that ride great.
AdkMtnMonster is offline  
Likes For AdkMtnMonster:
Old 06-25-21, 11:22 AM
  #11  
terrymorse 
climber has-been
 
terrymorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Palo Alto, CA
Posts: 4,273

Bikes: Scott Addict R1

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 937 Post(s)
Liked 767 Times in 423 Posts
Originally Posted by pickysoul View Post
GP 5000 gets puncture easilier than 4000. try Pirelli Pzero,dude.
Very little difference in puncture resistance between these models, per bicyclerollingresistance.com:

Tire model - rolling resistance - puncture score
PIrelli P Zero Velo - 13.2 - 54
Continental Grand Prix 5000 - 10.7 - 49
Continental Grand Prix 4000S II - 12.9 - 52
__________________
Ride, Rest, Repeat
terrymorse is offline  
Likes For terrymorse:
Old 06-25-21, 11:55 AM
  #12  
msu2001la
Senior Member
 
msu2001la's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Midwest
Posts: 1,472
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 616 Post(s)
Liked 519 Times in 314 Posts
It's 1000 better.
msu2001la is offline  
Old 06-25-21, 12:01 PM
  #13  
icemilkcoffee
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 762
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 445 Post(s)
Liked 317 Times in 196 Posts
FWIW I always have trouble mounting 5000's on every rim I've tried. The 4000s II is noticeably easier to mount.
icemilkcoffee is offline  
Old 06-25-21, 12:38 PM
  #14  
Barry2 
LR÷P=HR
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 1,026

Bikes: 79 Holdsworth Special, 93 C-dale MT3000 Tandem, 96 C-dale F700CAD3, 2018 Cervelo R3, JustGo Runt, Ridley Oval, Kickr Bike 8-)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 388 Post(s)
Liked 392 Times in 247 Posts
Originally Posted by icemilkcoffee View Post
FWIW I always have trouble mounting 5000's on every rim I've tried. The 4000s II is noticeably easier to mount.
+1
5000's are t.i.g.h.t !!!!!

As per other thread, Parachute Cord is your friend

Barry
Barry2 is offline  
Old 06-25-21, 12:45 PM
  #15  
Iride01
Hits [ENTER] b4 thinking
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 8,217

Bikes: '20 Tarmac Disc Comp '91, '78 Raleigh Competition GS

Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3237 Post(s)
Liked 1,831 Times in 1,299 Posts
Tubeless or tubed version of 5000's are harder to mount?

I've no experience with the tubeless version, but the tubed version of the GP 5000 are some of the easiest to mount or remove. No levers needed.

There is only room in the spoke channel for one tire bead. So make sure you push the bead of the already installed side out of the spoke channel as you push the other into it.
Iride01 is offline  
Likes For Iride01:
Old 06-25-21, 12:51 PM
  #16  
Nessism
Banned.
 
Nessism's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 2,993

Bikes: Homebuilt steel

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 601 Post(s)
Liked 145 Times in 114 Posts
4000's in the 700x25c size are noticeably larger than a 5000. I learned that because with 4000's there is very little clearance between my fork and tire but with the 5000 there is several mm's more clearance. That may be a contributor to the 4000's having more rolling resistance.
Nessism is offline  
Old 06-25-21, 12:54 PM
  #17  
Tomm Willians
Senior Member
 
Tomm Willians's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2020
Location: Nevada County, California
Posts: 468

Bikes: Subject to change at any given moment but currently is...... Colnago Mapei, Colnago C40, Wilier Triestina Carbon, Wilier Triestina Ramato, Follis 472, Peugeot PX60, Razesa, Orbea Terra, Soma Pescadero and 1/2 owner of a Santana tandem.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 188 Post(s)
Liked 434 Times in 142 Posts
Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
That's good to know, I was unaware. The 5000s seem true to size while the 4000s were often larger than nominal. Other than that, I can't tell a difference. Nice tires, both.
Keep in mind that saying one tire is more puncture resistant than the other is just a consideration. I’ve run GP5000’s on three different bikes for two years with zero flats. While I’ve no doubt the 4000 is more resistant, the 5000 has proven itself good enough in that category. At least on the routes I ride.
Tomm Willians is offline  
Likes For Tomm Willians:
Old 06-25-21, 02:01 PM
  #18  
Jrasero
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 141

Bikes: Canyon Ultimate CF SL Disc 8.0

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 62 Post(s)
Liked 38 Times in 28 Posts
While I can contest that GP5000 are awesome tires, they aren't worth upgrading if your GP4000 are in good shape since a set of GP5000 aren't cheap
Jrasero is offline  
Old 06-25-21, 02:42 PM
  #19  
MrWasabi 
Senior Member
 
MrWasabi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Lutz, FL
Posts: 416

Bikes: 2014 Fuji Traverse 1.3, 2020 Electra Cruiser 1, 1995 Giant CFM-4

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 123 Post(s)
Liked 49 Times in 34 Posts
How are the GP5000s on less then perfect pavement and hardpack?
MrWasabi is offline  
Old 06-25-21, 02:53 PM
  #20  
Hiro11
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,432

Bikes: To the right: opinions, not facts.

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 663 Post(s)
Liked 305 Times in 165 Posts
To answer the OPs question: no, it's not worth it. When your tires wear out,just buy the 5000s then.

Personally, I'm currently on my second set of 28mm GP5000TLs. I weigh about 165 and I run them tubeless on hooked carbon rims at about 75psi in the front and 77psi in the back. Despite their reputation for tightness, I can mount them on these rims with my hands. I got at least 4.5k miles on the first set with no punctures (none at least that I noticed). I probably threw out the first set a bit early to be honest. The second set is going strong at 4K miles on our terrible Illinois roads. Incredible tires in all respects: grip, ride, speed, reliability, durability. I have another set in storage already for when these wear out. I'm sure other tires are also great, but why mess with what works.
Hiro11 is offline  
Old 06-25-21, 06:38 PM
  #21  
dmanthree
Senior Member
 
dmanthree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Northeastern MA, USA
Posts: 1,432

Bikes: 2017 Roubaix

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 545 Post(s)
Liked 192 Times in 132 Posts
Originally Posted by icemilkcoffee View Post
FWIW I always have trouble mounting 5000's on every rim I've tried. The 4000s II is noticeably easier to mount.
I just mounted a pair on Roval SLX 24 wheels last weekend with no issues. No tools needed to get them on.
dmanthree is offline  
Old 06-25-21, 10:22 PM
  #22  
rsbob 
Sniveling Weasel
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Seattle-ish
Posts: 1,476

Bikes: Orbea Orca, Fondriest Racing, Bianchi Trofeo, Bianchi Infinito, Schwinn Varsity, Trek mtn

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 530 Post(s)
Liked 790 Times in 499 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
Tubeless or tubed version of 5000's are harder to mount?

I've no experience with the tubeless version, but the tubed version of the GP 5000 are some of the easiest to mount or remove. No levers needed.

There is only room in the spoke channel for one tire bead. So make sure you push the bead of the already installed side out of the spoke channel as you push the other into it.
I have Conti 5000 tubed on one bike and tubeless on the other. Neither are any more difficult to mount than any other Conti tire. A couple of tire levers and you should be good. My tubeless are as easy as tubed but it could be my rims too.
__________________
Rick S

“He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.”- Fredrick Nietzsche. “An argument based reasoned fact, beats one based on emotional rantings every time” Anon





rsbob is offline  
Old 06-26-21, 02:55 AM
  #23  
ooga-booga
lead on, macduff!
 
ooga-booga's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: insane diego, california
Posts: 6,660

Bikes: 85 pinarello treviso steel, 88 nishiki olympic steel. 95 look kg 131 carbon, 11 trek madone 5.2 carbon

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1118 Post(s)
Liked 1,499 Times in 825 Posts
Originally Posted by MrWasabi View Post
How are the GP5000s on less then perfect pavement and hardpack?
was avoiding riding on hard-packed gravel/dirt with the conti gp 5k's originally with the first pair. since then, they've been slapped on all four road bikes,
dirt is fair game. pavement in metro san diego is hit or miss. either pretty dayum smooth or why hasn't this repaved in a decade?!
tires have held up well w/o issues or flats while riding tubed. maybe i'm just lucky x 4...
ooga-booga is offline  
Likes For ooga-booga:
Old 06-26-21, 05:33 AM
  #24  
MrWasabi 
Senior Member
 
MrWasabi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Lutz, FL
Posts: 416

Bikes: 2014 Fuji Traverse 1.3, 2020 Electra Cruiser 1, 1995 Giant CFM-4

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 123 Post(s)
Liked 49 Times in 34 Posts
Originally Posted by ooga-booga View Post
was avoiding riding on hard-packed gravel/dirt with the conti gp 5k's originally with the first pair. since then, they've been slapped on all four road bikes,
dirt is fair game. pavement in metro san diego is hit or miss. either pretty dayum smooth or why hasn't this repaved in a decade?!
tires have held up well w/o issues or flats while riding tubed. maybe i'm just lucky x 4...
Thanks for the input. I'll be running mine with tubes on mostly paved MUPs/trails and some FL hardpack.
MrWasabi is offline  
Old 06-26-21, 04:42 PM
  #25  
Troul 
:D
 
Troul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Mich
Posts: 4,306
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 1,089 Times in 781 Posts
I have yet to go 4,000 miles without a flat on the c4k, I highly doubt I could go 5,000 miles before a flat when using the c5k tires.
__________________
-Oh Hey!
Troul is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.