Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Anti-Seize Compound For New And Old Bicycles

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Anti-Seize Compound For New And Old Bicycles

Old 07-03-21, 11:04 AM
  #1  
zandoval 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
zandoval's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bastrop Texas
Posts: 2,368

Bikes: Univega, Peu P6, Peu PR-10, Ted Williams, Peu UO-8, Peu UO-18 Mixte

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 196 Post(s)
Liked 223 Times in 163 Posts
Anti-Seize Compound For New And Old Bicycles

My 8 oz bottle of Permatex Anti-Seize Compound is finally at the bottom. I use it on everything. Cars, Mowers, Boats, Computers, and yes, Bicycles. Having acquired this bottle in the early 90's and really having used no other brand before and after I am wondering...

What's the best Anti-Seize compound I should be using on my bicycles?

Is there one I should not use on my bicycles?

__________________
No matter where your at... There you are... Δf:=f(1/2)-f(-1/2)
zandoval is offline  
Old 07-03-21, 12:31 PM
  #2  
Andrew R Stewart 
Senior Member
 
Andrew R Stewart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 15,169

Bikes: Stewart S&S coupled sport tourer, Stewart Sunday light, Stewart Commuting, Stewart Touring, Co Motion Tandem, Stewart 3-Spd, Stewart Track, Fuji Finest, Raleigh Pro, Trek Cycle Cross, Mongoose tomac ATB, GT Bravado ATB, JCP Folder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3011 Post(s)
Liked 1,336 Times in 934 Posts
While there are TI specific AS compounds (and other metal referenced ones) the overlap with most all the hardware store stuff is large. I suspect for most all bike work it's like the chain lube question. The best is the one you will use. Andy
__________________
AndrewRStewart
Andrew R Stewart is offline  
Likes For Andrew R Stewart:
Old 07-03-21, 02:30 PM
  #3  
Crankycrank
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 2,425
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 470 Post(s)
Liked 347 Times in 275 Posts
Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
While there are TI specific AS compounds (and other metal referenced ones) the overlap with most all the hardware store stuff is large. I suspect for most all bike work it's like the chain lube question. The best is the one you will use. Andy
+1. Lot's of discussions and ads around the net on this and a lot of disagreements. Why not just keep using the Permatex if that's what has been working for you. Personally I prefer just using grease and preferably marine grease if I have some laying around. Not as durable as some anti-seizes but a heck of a lot less messy, easier to clean off when working on parts, easier to work with and lasts a long time in most conditions. Just my 2 cents.
Crankycrank is offline  
Old 07-03-21, 02:44 PM
  #4  
Iride01
Hits [ENTER] b4 thinking
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 8,265

Bikes: '20 Tarmac Disc Comp '91, '78 Raleigh Competition GS

Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3257 Post(s)
Liked 1,848 Times in 1,313 Posts
I have a little bit of a quart can of nickel anti-seize that was my dad's from back in the early 80's maybe even the late 70's. I've never found any other type of anti-seize necessary. Nickel AS is decent for most all normal things.

Little bit goes a long way. Last a long time. Hard to get out of clothing. I wouldn't be too particular about brands. It's just a bike, not a space craft.
Iride01 is online now  
Old 07-03-21, 04:46 PM
  #5  
RGMN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Twin Cities,MN
Posts: 466
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 210 Post(s)
Liked 166 Times in 114 Posts
I've found the stick style anti-seize is much more convenient to use and is not a messy as the can/brush or tube styles. I currently have Loctite 8065 just because it is in a stick form.
RGMN is offline  
Likes For RGMN:
Old 07-03-21, 05:07 PM
  #6  
79pmooney
A Roadie Forever
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 9,665

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2989 Post(s)
Liked 1,583 Times in 1,050 Posts
Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
While there are TI specific AS compounds (and other metal referenced ones) the overlap with most all the hardware store stuff is large. I suspect for most all bike work it's like the chain lube question. The best is the one you will use. Andy
+1 I have an open tub of marine grease that gets used for all sorts of stuff. Been sitting open on my bike workbench for probably 10 years. Use it for all threads (way beyond just bikes) with about two exceptions. Love that when I come back to a wheel many years later, the nipple turns like I built it last week.

(Just remembered one of my thread exceptions. My screw top Mocha coffee makers. They get olive oil applied with a paper towel corner. Lube that 's safe to ingest.)
79pmooney is offline  
Likes For 79pmooney:
Old 07-03-21, 05:27 PM
  #7  
dsbrantjr
Senior Member
 
dsbrantjr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Roswell, GA
Posts: 8,152

Bikes: '93 Trek 750, '92 Schwinn Crisscross, '93 Mongoose Alta

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1371 Post(s)
Liked 905 Times in 630 Posts
My choice for dissimilar metal joints is Tef-Gel® which is specifically designed to resist electrolytic corrosion. It contains PTFE rather than metal; I don't like introducing another metal into the mix with nickel/copper high-temperature antisieze formulas. Bikes do not require high-temperature properties. Expensive but a little goes a long way. https://www.ultratef-gel.com/tef-gel/
dsbrantjr is offline  
Old 07-03-21, 09:17 PM
  #8  
zandoval 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
zandoval's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bastrop Texas
Posts: 2,368

Bikes: Univega, Peu P6, Peu PR-10, Ted Williams, Peu UO-8, Peu UO-18 Mixte

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 196 Post(s)
Liked 223 Times in 163 Posts
Originally Posted by RGMN View Post
,,,stick style anti-seize is much more convenient.....
Never heard of it sure beats squeezing my old AS into a syringe.

Originally Posted by dsbrantjr View Post
My choice for dissimilar metal joints is Tef-Gel®...
Man... I should have used this on my boat parts...
__________________
No matter where your at... There you are... Δf:=f(1/2)-f(-1/2)
zandoval is offline  
Old 07-03-21, 09:21 PM
  #9  
zandoval 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
zandoval's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bastrop Texas
Posts: 2,368

Bikes: Univega, Peu P6, Peu PR-10, Ted Williams, Peu UO-8, Peu UO-18 Mixte

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 196 Post(s)
Liked 223 Times in 163 Posts
Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
..I suspect for most all bike work it's like the chain lube question...
Oh-No!!! Not a chain lube question... Sorry Guys...
__________________
No matter where your at... There you are... Δf:=f(1/2)-f(-1/2)
zandoval is offline  
Old 07-03-21, 10:36 PM
  #10  
3alarmer
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 19,875

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 283 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21788 Post(s)
Liked 4,651 Times in 3,414 Posts
.
...to some extent, the answer to this depends on what you are trying to keep from seizing. But yeah, most of them work for regular old aluminum/steel contact and steel/ steel contact. Carbon anything is a special case. There're a number of charts that take the electrolytic potential of various metals into account, and from there you can figure out specific anti-seize compounds to use in your application.

I think I have small jars of both a zinc/copper sacrificial metals compound, and a nickel compound. AS stated, bicycles are not especially demanding, if you store them someplace dry and don't live near the ocean, or ride them through a lot of road salt.

Anti-seize Compounds Information


...I once started a thread in mechanics on anti-seize that went on for probably ten pages.
There used to be a lot of olde guys on here who were certain it was a waste off money on bicycles.

I remember thinking that one or two of them might have a stroke, when that thread was going on.
In an entirely passive aggressive way, that was kind of fun.
3alarmer is online now  
Likes For 3alarmer:
Old 07-04-21, 09:04 AM
  #11  
easyupbug 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,745

Bikes: too many sparkly Italians, some sweet Americans and a couple interesting Japanese

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 302 Post(s)
Liked 169 Times in 126 Posts
Originally Posted by zandoval View Post
...Is there one I should not use on my bicycles?
There is a reason Park Tool only has one grade of squeeze tube anti-seize and that's because it will do all you need for bike, unless maybe you leave it outside year round on the coast were you could justify a marine grade product. As to what not to use we had warehouses full of the stuff in mines, mills, smelters and refineries for specialty uses but a huge waste of money for just steel, SS, aluminum and titanium and various coating on fasteners found on a bike.
easyupbug is offline  
Likes For easyupbug:
Old 07-04-21, 09:28 AM
  #12  
zandoval 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
zandoval's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bastrop Texas
Posts: 2,368

Bikes: Univega, Peu P6, Peu PR-10, Ted Williams, Peu UO-8, Peu UO-18 Mixte

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 196 Post(s)
Liked 223 Times in 163 Posts
Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
...charts that take the electrolytic potential of various metals into account...
Thank you! It was a pleasure to examine the chart in depth. The spread of metals electrical potential (+) to (-) is very interesting. Not surprised that solder in right in the middle. Lost my old LeaFax pocket reference note books long ago and miss them dearly. To lazy to bring out my Eshbach's, but still keep my Glover on the work bench.

Think I'll just get another 8oz bottle of the Permatex AS. That should last me another 40 years and at the age of 68 it should do. Ha...
__________________
No matter where your at... There you are... Δf:=f(1/2)-f(-1/2)
zandoval is offline  
Old 07-04-21, 09:32 AM
  #13  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 7,922

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400, 2013 Novara Randonee, 1990 Trek 970

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1706 Post(s)
Liked 1,352 Times in 874 Posts
For use on Stainless steel Al or Ni based is recommended.
dedhed is offline  
Old 07-04-21, 09:36 AM
  #14  
sweeks
Senior Member
 
sweeks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Chicago area
Posts: 1,742

Bikes: Airborne "Carpe Diem", Motobecane "Mirage", Trek 6000, Strida 2, Dahon "Helios XL", Dahon "Mu XL", Tern "Verge S11i"

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 684 Post(s)
Liked 194 Times in 150 Posts
My titanium-framed road bike, with a titanium seatpost, came with a recommendation to use a copper-based anti-seize compound. A small amount was furnished. In 20 years, I've had no issues. This doesn't mean other anti-seizes wouldn't work as well.
sweeks is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.