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2005 Trek 5000 Upgrade path

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2005 Trek 5000 Upgrade path

Old 07-26-21, 02:13 PM
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mizer2167
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2005 Trek 5000 Upgrade path

Afternoon.

I recently took up cycling again after a ~16 year break, starting with a indoor trainer and now progressing back to the road. So, to get back out there, I pulled down and dusted off my old bike a 2005 Trek 5000.

16 years is a long time and while I could always buy a new ride and that would be the most fun, the one thing that could benefit from the most improvement right now is me.

That being said, I think the frame is likely worthy of a few minor (or transferrable) upgrades while I work on my fitness. Which upgrades to an otherwise all-stock (circa 2005) bike would be the most beneficial, from wear items like tires and tubes to wheels and pedals that would give the most enjoyment at the lowest cost? I've been completely removed for quite a while and haven't kept apace of changes.
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Old 07-26-21, 02:27 PM
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I used owned/ ran bicycle stores for 12 yrs and a Trek dealer for 7. I know that bike. I used to have some of those Rolf/ Bontrager "paired spoke" designed wheels that come on that bike. At some point after I was out of the bike business, I noticed that Trek had stopped using those wheels on their bikes. I called a local Trek dealership to find out the story. It turns out that design puts too much stress/ pull on a small area of the hub flange and they are highly likely to crack. The wheels became a huge warrantee nightmare for Trek and they really had to stop putting those type of wheels on their bikes. After hearing about it, I could not wait to get rid of the few pairs of those ASAP. So; I would recommend upgrading the wheels on your Trek 5000.
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Old 07-26-21, 02:29 PM
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If its a 2005 and you took a 16 yr break I'm guessing the group hasn't seen a lot of use (you didn't mention the groupset on the bike -Ultegra?). So other than tubes/tires maybe take it to a reputable local bike shop and let them tune it up or at least look at it and make recommendations. Thinking cables might be good to change after all that time. If its Shimano then in 2005 you had Dura-Ace, Ultegra and 105. In 2021 you have Dura-Ace, Ultegra, 105....and the lower groups. Things have changed and groups have gotten lighter over time but as mentioned if there's not a lot of wear on the group its probably still good.
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Old 07-26-21, 02:38 PM
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3x9 or 2x9? If 3x9 you probably just need to get everything cleaned, lubed and adjusted and ride the crap out of it till you are all cleaned out and adjusted. Then maybe by middle of next year there'll be plenty of new bikes available and components if you are still wanting to upgrade it.

If it's a 2x9, is it the 53/39 with 12-26 on the back? That would wear me out in the rolling hills around me, but depending on your fitness and terrain in your area maybe okay. If not okay, then just consider either smaller chain wheels or a nn-28 or nn-30 cassette if that will work with your rear and front DR's.
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Old 07-26-21, 03:00 PM
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It's a 3X9, fortunately. I'm 6'5" (62cm frame) and about 238 lbs. right now and I very much appreciate having the triple. That being said I moved from a more hilly section of the country to a flat section, so I'm not really using more than a few gears.

I have noticed the Bontrager rear wheel ("Race Lite") does have a few cracks near some of the spokes and they're out of true. There's a little rust on the cables, but overall, they work. Even the old Cateye computer fired up after a simple battery change. I only rode it for 1 year and ~2000 miles, so overall while it could likely use a tune up, it seems to ride fine. For the poster that asked, it's a mix of 105 and Ultegra for this year.

Wheels, tires & tubes, lighter pedals (w/some new shoes; switching to SPD-SL from Time) and a tune up were what I was thinking. Trying to find something a bit lighter, but my head is spinning trying to identify the right wheelset that will work with the components I have.
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Old 07-26-21, 03:12 PM
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Just imagine you'd bought the bike used, from a stranger, and you know nothing about how it was kept. 15 years is long enough for a lot of lubricant to have dried up and/or gotten gummy.

My personal approach would be to strip it down and repack everything, but that's me, and I enjoy doing it. But at minimum - I'd replace tires and tubes, cables and housing. Maybe brake pads. Have the wheels trued and ask them how the hubs feel. Pull the seapost and regrease it.
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Old 07-26-21, 03:35 PM
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As far as upgrades, wider tires would be high on my list. You can run them at lower pressures (google "SRAM tire pressure"), making the ride more comfortable without really gaining rolling resistance. Handlebars with less reach and drop, especially if you find you're not using the drops much.
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Old 07-26-21, 04:49 PM
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Trek 5000

Originally Posted by mizer2167 View Post
It's a 3X9, fortunately. I'm 6'5" (62cm frame) and about 238 lbs. right now and I very much appreciate having the triple. That being said I moved from a more hilly section of the country to a flat section, so I'm not really using more than a few gears.

I have noticed the Bontrager rear wheel ("Race Lite") does have a few cracks near some of the spokes and they're out of true. There's a little rust on the cables, but overall, they work. Even the old Cateye computer fired up after a simple battery change. I only rode it for 1 year and ~2000 miles, so overall while it could likely use a tune up, it seems to ride fine. For the poster that asked, it's a mix of 105 and Ultegra for this year.

Wheels, tires & tubes, lighter pedals (w/some new shoes; switching to SPD-SL from Time) and a tune up were what I was thinking. Trying to find something a bit lighter, but my head is spinning trying to identify the right wheelset that will work with the components I have.
There is a high chance that the reason that your rear wheel is out of true because the cracks are just starting to change the way the rim is held by the spokes. I was riding with someone with Bontrager low spoke count wheels once. their wheel went out of true. I offered to true it up, but with further inspection his hub was cracked. Lighter stuff, I would concentrate on loosing some personnel weight first.
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Old 07-26-21, 05:35 PM
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Yes, I was quite a bit lighter in Feb. 2020, so working to get back in shape and looking at cycling to help as it did for me ~16 years ago. At that time, I dropped ~30 lbs. in about 5 months cycling 75-100 miles a week with minimal diet changes. I need to lose 30 lbs. to get back to my "old" weight and can probably do a bit better to get into real cycling shape, so more than the entire weight of my bike...lighter won't matter when framed in that way, I know. The change of pace and diet since last year didn't do any favors for my waistline.

That being said, if I'm forking out for new wheels vs. stock, might as well try to find something that nets a (however small) advantage. The pedals were mainly because I wanted consistency between the trainer and my road bike, plus my old shoes and cleats didn't survive storage very well.
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Old 07-26-21, 06:19 PM
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Originally Posted by mizer2167 View Post
It's a 3X9, fortunately…my head is spinning trying to identify the right wheelset that will work with the components I have.
Easy to find a wheel set. Just make sure they are quick release hubs with 700c rims that are made for rim braking.

Don’t go nuts upgrading wheels on an old bike like that. I’d go with some 105 hubs and standard aluminum rims. A few choices at Colorado Cyclist.
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Old 07-26-21, 06:37 PM
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New wheels. Aeoles Pro 5 with 23 mm GP5000 tires.
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Old 07-26-21, 09:22 PM
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Originally Posted by mizer2167 View Post
I have noticed the Bontrager rear wheel ("Race Lite") does have a few cracks near some of the spokes and they're out of true. There's a little rust on the cables, but overall, they work. Even the old Cateye computer fired up after a simple battery change. I only rode it for 1 year and ~2000 miles, so overall while it could likely use a tune up, it seems to ride fine. For the poster that asked, it's a mix of 105 and Ultegra for this year.

Wheels, tires & tubes, lighter pedals (w/some new shoes; switching to SPD-SL from Time) and a tune up were what I was thinking. Trying to find something a bit lighter, but my head is spinning trying to identify the right wheelset that will work with the components I have.
If you can see cracks its a health hazard. Although decent wheels the bontragers were never really that light, so plenty of decent wheels will leave you at the same or similar weight.
https://www.velomine.com/index.php?m...pga8pbse4tan54
https://www.velomine.com/index.php?m...pga8pbse4tan54
Both about 300.00 and 2000g, fully compatible with your bike, just get some tires and tubes to go with them. Lighter is always possible but not cheaply. Replace the wheels and go have fun.
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Old 07-27-21, 08:12 PM
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I had the dura ace equipped version of that year’s bike. I loved the frame and geometry. Similar to you, I had ridden it well for a year and then put it to the side during various moves until 2012 when I picked up cycling again to drop forty pounds. It was a great bike then and will be great for you now I’m sure. I think you’re going in the right direction get a reasonable set of light wheels. If memory serves, you can get new hubs and simply add the spacer for 9/10spd so that if you do get a new bike later you can simply remove the spacer and put an 11 speed cassette on.
not sure if the statistics bare this out but I still believe that reasonably light wheels and light pedals Helped me greatly when I was getting back into riding. Simply put the rotating weight was easier for me to spin up. I’m actuallly still using my circa 2005 dura ace pedals on my current bike they’ve certainly lasted through time!

enjoy the heck out of the bike, swap out your cables get some new wheels and make sure everything else is in good running order it’s a top-notch steed to accomplish your goals. Then treat yourself to a new bike as a reward when you’ve gotten to a place but you’re happy with.

Last edited by robbyville; 07-27-21 at 08:16 PM.
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Old 07-28-21, 07:18 AM
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Yes, believe I'm set on new wheels and tires. The more I look at my rear wheel, the more I don't like the cracking at the spokes.

Trying to decide on either a custom built set of aluminum wheels, Fulcrum Racing 3's or....Chinese carbon aero wheels if I'm feeling lucky that day. While the wheelset alone will cost more than the bike is worth, it's probably the best option until the supply chain gets unstuck.

As I start adding up the costs I also think...well....for only "$XXXX" more I could have a brand new bike, so that thought's still in the back of my mind.
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