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How do you secure a musette bag?

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How do you secure a musette bag?

Old 01-21-19, 09:17 PM
  #26  
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Musette backs (cycling variety) were designed as a way to feed cyclists on a long race, as others have noted. They were never intended as a way to carry something over a long distance. In a feed zone, you stuck your arm out to catch it. Feed zones were usually near the top of a climb where the rider's speed was low enough to do make the exchange. They were made rather cheaply, just enough to do the job. You grabbed your bag, transferred the contents to your jersey pockets, and chucked it.



Using it for something it was not intended for may result in loosing the contents of said bag. If you want to bring something along with, use jersey pockets. If you don't have jersey pockets, a fanny pack will suffice.

Me, I'm a handlebar bag kinda guy.

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Old 01-21-19, 11:55 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by davester
The main reason for wanting a musette is for "overflow" food and possibly clothes on long (60 to 100 mile) self-supported rides. I don't need much space and after consuming enough food I can fold up the musette and stick it in my pocket. It's quite comfortable carrying it behind my back but can be a little irritating when it slides around to the front. As implied by rccardr, it was quite common for riders to use them for this purpose on long rides back in the day.
That's what I use a cloth hobo bag for. Better than any cycling or military surplus musette I've tried -- I've discarded or given away all of those. I usually wear it as a sling, over my right shoulder, and can easily reach in with my left hand (I have better range of motion with the left due to a right shoulder injury last year).

And it'll hold my helmet, gloves, lights, etc., even my road shoes, when I go into a store, friend's brew pub or restaurant, so I don't have to juggle all that stuff or worry about it being stolen off the bike.

It looks pretty much like this one on Amazon, and these on Etsy. When empty it rolls up about the same size as a cotton short sleeve t-shirt. Costs less than $10, worth a try.
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Old 01-22-19, 01:00 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by Giacomo 1
Those bags are pretty nice and certainly more practical, as most modern equipment is, but they are not very C&V. Musett bags are, especially the logo's that are often stamped on them, and that's probably why the OP would like to use them.
Maybe you are right! Practical but not too much C&V.
I think I could search some kind of bag more 70/80'ish.
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Old 01-22-19, 09:00 AM
  #29  
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Hahahahaha


@davester - you need a classic cycling vest, with built-in backpack. Pockets everywhere, nice snug fit. (like the story about the kangaroo with no pockets, given a perfect solution by the carpenter guy). Vintage waxed cotton version not recommended for hot days.



Let me look for a pic showing back, with flap.
Ah yes, side view.


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Old 01-22-19, 09:30 AM
  #30  
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I carry a big bandanna on bike tours. If I have to carry more food than I have space for, I put it in the bandanna and knot the corners together. Then you tuck it in your belt so the knots are above your belt to keep it it place. I usually position it about midway between my hip pocket and back pocket, which keeps it out of the way. It works really well, but I never carry more than a couple of pounds or stuff that way--just the occasional rotisserie chicken or whatever.

When you're off the bike you can carry the bandanna on the end of a stick over your shoulder, like you're running away from home. It's surprisingly comfortable, and entertaining for any onlookers.
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Old 01-22-19, 01:16 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by jonwvara
I carry a big bandanna on bike tours. If I have to carry more food than I have space for, I put it in the bandanna and knot the corners together. Then you tuck it in your belt so the knots are above your belt to keep it it place. I usually position it about midway between my hip pocket and back pocket, which keeps it out of the way. It works really well, but I never carry more than a couple of pounds or stuff that way--just the occasional rotisserie chicken or whatever.

When you're off the bike you can carry the bandanna on the end of a stick over your shoulder, like you're running away from home. It's surprisingly comfortable, and entertaining for any onlookers.
That was the inspiration for the cloth hobo bag. Just a big sheet of cloth sewn together to formalize the makeshift bandanna/bag.
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Old 01-22-19, 01:36 PM
  #32  
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Screw dat... leave it to the domestique. ;")
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Old 01-22-19, 04:20 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by crank_addict
Screw dat... leave it to the domestique. ;")
!

Not in my best day could I do what a domestique does!
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Old 01-26-19, 05:18 PM
  #34  
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I saw a nice Musette bag for sale on FB this morning


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Old 01-27-19, 01:57 PM
  #35  
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Snug the strap (but not tight). <-- free

Flip it back if it starts to move. <-- also free
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Old 01-27-19, 04:13 PM
  #36  
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I have a freebie laptop bag I have used as a musette on occasion. It has a little D-ring on each of the bottom corners of some reason. One day when it was the only bag I could find on hand, I tied an old shoelace to the appropriate D-ring to hold it centered on my back. The other end of the shoelace I tied to a belt loop on my pants.

This is pretty dorky, but I think riding with musettes is kinda dorky in general. I always assumed they were used mostly by the hipster/fixie/messenger crowd for the "look."
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Old 06-07-23, 07:46 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by davester
Simple question. I've used a musette bag on a number of rides and would be happy using one if only it didn't slide around from back to side then front. Has anyone here figured out a simple way to make them stay put?
For years I have repurposed strap excess as a messenger-style stabilizer on my musettes and any one-strap bags:

1) Tighten the strap all the way
2) Take the excess strap and loop it back towards where the strap attaches to the bag ensuring that it is routes beneath the load bearing strap
3) Secure the end of the strap to the buckle between the bag and strap or secure it to the bag itself in some way (even if this is just a split key ring through the strap end loop and through stitching in a fabric -finishing border on the bag)
4) Insert your arm through the loop youve created mounting the load bearing strap on one shoulder, passing the excess under your armpit, bag on back
5) Buckle

Once the excess is secured permanently and comfortably you leave it like that permanently, only unbuckling and buckling the bag as it was designed. The design of the bag strap determines which shoulder the bag must rest on.

With leather I have inserted a capped metal stud in the strap by the shoulder which has enough space for a circular lobster clasp that I attached to the end of the excess to clip onto tightly

Last edited by bisonbike; 06-07-23 at 07:51 AM.
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Old 06-07-23, 10:12 AM
  #38  
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Never been a musette bag fan. I get the use as a race hand-up that is transferred to pockets and tossed ASAP. (And seen a fair number of crashes that tend to go with that procedure.)

My one positive musette experience; my first Cycle Oregon. All riders got these nice, black plastic cloth, small musette bags. I folded mine neatly and put it in my pocket. Day two, my seatpost broke. (Good ol' Avocet.) I had 3 miles to go - out of the saddle. But it was a given my shorts would touch the jagged metal of the broken clamp. Then I realized I had a stretchy sock to carry surplus jackets and the like and I had that musette. Folded it up to a small square, stuffed it into the toe, slipped the sock over the post. Worked beautifully!

When the fixie scene was at its pitch here in Portland, I saw many using musettes. Some seemed to do very well with them but many others were constantly tossing the bag back behind. I never could get those bags to stay put and always viewed wearing one as being burdened with a minor curse. (When I remember, I do bring those Cycle Oregon ones with me on their rides. Very useful carrying the lunch items from the food line to my chosen spot of shade.
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Old 06-07-23, 10:36 AM
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Not musette bags but I've recently reacquainted myself with another ancient bike (tiny) cargo trick - jersey front pockets. No, they don't carry much but they do put important stuff where you can find it and is secure when the back pockets are overloaded. I had the jersey made to order by the outfit that made our custom fit club jerseys my last season of racing, It saw little use because I tired to wear club or sponsor's jerseys whenever I could.

That jersey is pre-modern sturdy synthetic so warm. Not a hot weather jersey though I used tt wear it and its siblings in the 98 and 98 of Boston summers. But that sturdy fabric and well stitched pockets are excellent for cargo hauling. Don't blink at full waterbottles. (Thank you, Jones Cyclewear. Its sibling, my old race jersey, is totally faded, ten(s?) of thousands of miles and has yet to need any repair. Still rides almost as new.)
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Old 06-07-23, 10:49 AM
  #40  
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Rivendell (of course) has a couple:

https://www.rivbike.com/products/mus...of-nice-fabric

https://www.rivbike.com/products/sac...pr_seq=uniform

I rather like the look of the Musaette. Could stitch on a third strap if you so desire to match the nice design of the waxed canvas one linked above in the thread. And buckles on the straps would probably be nice.
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Old 06-07-23, 05:26 PM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by Piff
Could stitch on a third strap if you so desire to match the nice design of the waxed canvas one linked above in the thread. And buckles on the straps would probably be nice.
So my attempted contribution here was to say that a third strap is already built in if you repurpose the excess length of a bags strap
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Old 06-07-23, 05:43 PM
  #42  
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Great someone resurrected this thread. I love the Apidura packable musette and rarely ride without it. Sure for a short or medium ride I would not bring it however Im going for a long ride or just out and about I always pack it. You never know when you have to pick something up or bring something home from the store at the end of a long day on the bike. Always bring one on a tour because its a perfect way to pick up a few things at the shops and take them back without opening your bags, panniers, etc.
https://www.apidura.com/shop/packable-musette/
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Old 06-07-23, 07:50 PM
  #43  
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Atlas Shrugged
Wow, that's a fantastic bag! Thanks for posting.
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Old 06-07-23, 08:26 PM
  #44  
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I'm 100% with gugie here with regard to the definition and use of a "musette", but at the same time I want to be helpful.

At some running events that I've attended, participants were given items like this. They are simple, light, inexpensive, and someone with even modest sewing talents and a grommet tool could quickly and easily make one for themself. It compacts to a size about 1/4 the volume of a jersey, but could easily hold a bit over three liters of stuff. Just need fabric, cord, grommets (or some other creative attachment), thread and BAM! This one is made of water resistant nylon, but no reason you couldn't use something else.


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Old 06-11-23, 06:33 AM
  #45  
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Second shortening the strap and have it sit higher on your back. How you arrange the contents will help, and it'll still slip just not as much. Have used it to carry wallet/phone/locks on short rides, if you get the weight distribution right it won't move much.
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