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Removing and replacing rear tire on Land Rider

Old 08-05-12, 02:58 PM
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blump
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Removing and replacing rear tire on Land Rider

Does anyone have any suggestions where to find info for removing and replacing the rear wheel on a Land Rider bike. I need to fix a rear flat tire and I don't want to mess up the mechanism.
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Old 08-05-12, 03:27 PM
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Gonzo Bob
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https://www.lrbikes.com/parts_maintenance.htm

I noticed in the FAQ it says "Can I change the rear tire on the LandRider?
As with most bicycles, removing the Rear Wheel is complicated and is not recommended. Please contact a professional bike store or LandRider."
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Old 08-05-12, 04:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Gonzo Bob View Post
https://www.lrbikes.com/parts_maintenance.htm

I noticed in the FAQ it says "Can I change the rear tire on the LandRider?
As with most bicycles, removing the Rear Wheel is complicated and is not recommended. Please contact a professional bike store or LandRider."
Thanks for the reply.
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Old 08-05-12, 04:55 PM
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Your rear wheel comes off the same way as any bicycle.

It's fairly straightforward, and you should refer to the Landrider manual, or a basic bike care tutorial.

1- Shift the 2nd smallest rear sprocket, and the smaller or middle chainring
2- disconnect the brake cable, at the quick disconnect fitting, so brake arms open wider than the tire ---see manual
3- loosen wheel QR, or axle nuts.
4- Use right hand to pull the RD back against the spring, while lifting the frame. The rear wheel will slide forward and down - may need a nudge - and drop free forward of the RD, You may need to rotate the RD cage to clear the gear cluster and you'll need to move the lower loop of the chain past the axle.

the wheel is off, and you can change the tire -- see a tire tutorial ---

Going back on is the same but in the opposite direction.

Guide the wheel into the frame, helping the lower loop of the chain (comes off the back of the lower (longer arm of RD) pulley).
Put then upper loop of the chain onto the 2nd smallest sprocket (same as where it was when you took off the wheel)
Pull RD back and guide wheel into frame, and axle into dropout
center wheel in frame (horizontal slots) or hold bike vertical and let gravity return the axle to the tops of vertical slots
adjust and tighten QR or axle nuts (see QR tutorial if unsure of how a QR works)
reset brake cable, check brake,
check that all is good, put chain back on the same chainring if it fell off (it usually does), check rest of bike, ride home before it starts raining.

That's the short version, if the post was serious, read the various tutorials, or consider a bike repair/maintenance course from a local co-op if any.

BTW- I consider the ability to fix a flat on the road as the American Express Card of bike riding -- don't leave home without it. It seems complicated at first, but is actually straightforward, and flats do happen. Just as I insisted that my wife learn how to change a flat on her car, (even though she's attractive enough that she'd never need to) I feel everyone who rides more than 1/2 mile from home should be able to fix a flat on a bike. It's not complicated, and along with basic brake adjustments, knowing how to use a QR if they have one, some very basic derailleur adjustments is fundamental core knowledge anyone can and should master. There are many good tutorials, plus bike shops or co-ops run courses, and some community colleges offer classes. Either learn or stay tethered to your home.
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Old 08-05-12, 05:24 PM
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Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
Your rear wheel comes off the same way as any bicycle.
The Land Rider has an autoshift rear derailer and has a drive belt between the rear hub and rear derailer, perhaps complicating removal/installation. The online owner's manual does not say what to do with the drive belt when removing/installing the rear wheel.
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Old 08-05-12, 05:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Gonzo Bob View Post
The Land Rider has an autoshift rear derailer and has a drive belt between the rear hub and rear derailer, perhaps complicating removal/installation. The online owner's manual does not say what to do with the drive belt when removing/installing the rear wheel.
My response was a fast shorthand, which is why I had the OP refer to tutorials, including and especially the owners manual.

The belt is an added complication, but is also straightforward, running from a pulley on the wheel to a pinion near the upper chain pulley. The OP might use a digital camera or cell phone to document how it is when put together before taking it apart.

He most definitely should take a repair course from a co-op or other user friendly shop. But unfortunately for him, if he brings this bike to many typical (not all) shops it'll be derided as a BSO, and he won't get any help at all, including some that won't even take this as a paid flat repair.

Rather than list the obstacles, I prefer to talk about the basics and similarities helping people believe that bike repair is within their abilities if they make the effort to learn. This bike isn't an exception, though it does have an extra - not complicated - step.
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Old 08-06-12, 09:56 AM
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thanks to the both of you for the comments. I have fixed flats on manual shift bikes. The fact that Land Rider seems to make the rear wheel a "hands off" area by not even addressing it in the owners manual made me unsure. My wife gave me the bike as a gift and I did not have the heart to tell her it is more of a headache than it is worth. It is definitely not something I would want to deal with on the road.
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Old 08-06-12, 10:11 AM
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While your rear wheel has the added complication of the speed belt, it isn't insurmountable. I understand that the owners manual is pretty skimpy (being polite) but the warnings to see a pro are more boiler plate to avoid lawsuits, than because the issue is actually too complex.

If you have familiarity with derailleur heel removal, you can probably work through this. Take a few before pictures so you know what it needs to look like.

Otherwise, seek out a bike co-op, or what I call a blue collar bike shop, that does lots of repairs on all kinds of bikes and won't find this beneath their dignity. A decent mechanic can help you with the immediate repair if one is needed, and show you how to DIY if you have some mechanical instincts. (put the before photo into your bag with the spare tube and tire levers).

Note this isn't the greatest of bikes, but I understand your need not to hurt the givers feelings. I suggest you get this going and ride it a while, and if you decide to make cycling a regular thing, you shop for something better, and thank the giver for getting you started, and say you were upgrading to something faster. This will solve both the mechanical and human problem.
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Old 11-22-22, 02:31 PM
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I'm Currently working on one of these at the shop. The way to tension / detention the belt is, there is a slot on the derailleur mount. Just loosen the bolt, slide the derailleur and slip the belt off.
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Old 11-22-22, 02:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Bicycle_City View Post
I'm Currently working on one of these at the shop. The way to tension / detention the belt is, there is a slot on the derailleur mount. Just loosen the bolt, slide the derailleur and slip the belt off.
It's been a while. Hopefully the OP got his flat fixed by now.
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Old 11-22-22, 03:10 PM
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Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
It's been a while. Hopefully the OP got his flat fixed by now.
Yea I saw the date after I posted. I was looking for the same info when I figured the problem out. Hopefully it will help someone else in the future.
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