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Another newbie question

Old 10-01-22, 09:05 AM
  #51  
sbuckaroo
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I donít think I would be keen that much on speed. I am more interested in a comfortable ride having had four back surgeries over the years. I would like to start commuting to work but I am reluctant a bit since cyclists seem to have stealth technology as far as the drivers are concerned! I may try an aluminum even rental from an LBS jist to get an idea.

Originally Posted by Garfield Cat View Post
Age 55 and recently within 2 years: "more affordable" "buying used" - By now you have 2 years of riding and now have a pretty good idea as to what you like about the bikes you already have. It is now more about how you like to ride and not the materials.

Some riders like to go for the sport. That means faster speeds and longer distances. If this is you, then skip the curious mode and go straight up to the front of the line. If you like the way you ride now, then it may not matter what others tell you about aluminum or carbon fiber.
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Old 10-01-22, 10:39 AM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by sbuckaroo View Post
I think this is an excellent point. Indeed since I have only picked up biking two years ago (at age 55), and since I only tried steel, I am totally oblivious to what other frames could ride like. All I know is that (from what I read) that steel bikes absorb road imperfections better and are more resilient. Besides, I have to confess I dig how "clean" those older steel frames look
I usually ride in a trail nearby leading to Washington, DC, and the pavement is not that good. That is why I opted for steel. Would buying a used aluminum bike allow me to get a feel for this kind of frames or would it give a bit of a false feeling? the reason is they probably would be more affordable instead of buying new. I see a few older aluminum bikes on craiglist or facebook market place but as opposed to steel I didn't feel confident figuring out how good they are.
...presuming you are talking about non suspension frames, in comparison to the size of the tires you put on your bicycle, frame material is of only minor effect. So if your problem is rough pavement, your best approach initially would be to increase the width of your pneumatic tires. This will, in many cases, increase the rotating weight of your tire-wheel combination, so it might feel a little slower. But that seems unimportant to you.

Many road bicycles, from about the 80's onward, also have some limitations on the maximum tire size you can fit in the frame. But again, it's often not needed to go to the absolute maximum to get a workable solution.
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Old 10-01-22, 10:43 AM
  #53  
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good to know. I actually tried to use wider tires in my bikes. So on the Kona I use 32 mm, and on the IRO I went to 35 mm which is the widest I could go to allow the installation of fenders as this is the one I will use if I start commuting. For the Schwinn paramount I replaced the 23 mm it came with, with 25 mm. I think it probably wouldnít take wider tires.

Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
...presuming you are talking about non suspension frames, in comparison to the size of the tires you put on your bicycle, frame material is of only minor effect. So if your problem is rough pavement, your best approach initially would be to increase the width of your pneumatic tires. This will, in many cases, increase the rotating weight of your tire-wheel combination, so it might feel a little slower. But that seems unimportant to you.

Many road bicycles, from about the 80's onward, also have some limitations on the maximum tire size you can fit in the frame. But again, it's often not needed to go to the absolute maximum to get a workable solution.
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Old 10-01-22, 10:53 AM
  #54  
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Originally Posted by sbuckaroo View Post
good to know. I actually tried to use wider tires in my bikes. So on the Kona I use 32 mm, and on the IRO I went to 35 mm which is the widest I could go to allow the installation of fenders as this is the one I will use if I start commuting. For the Schwinn paramount I replaced the 23 mm it came with, with 25 mm. I think it probably wouldn’t take wider tires.
...I used to commute from my apartment in Mt Rainier, MD, next to the old movie theater that was then a church, by bicycle, in the 70's. Up route 1 to the U of MD, and down Rhode Island Ave into D.C. I found it was a marvelous way to get around back then, in the post streetcar, but pre Metro era of mass transit in Washington. There are a lot of things you will need to work out, like carrying stuff on the bike on racks in bags. And the whole theft thing is very discouraging. But if you can arrange a safe place to park your bike at work, it is very do-able. I commuted for many years by bike here in California, prior to retirement.

What's nice about it is that in a regular program of exercise, it allows you to take advantage of time that would otherwise be wasted, sitting in a car or on a bus. And if you can make it routine, it becomes a natural part of your exercise routine.
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Old 10-01-22, 10:56 AM
  #55  
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...oh yeah, if you've had 4 back surgeries, it's important that you stretch as a part of your riding. Trust me on this.
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Old 10-01-22, 11:26 AM
  #56  
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I am lucky to be near the capital crescent trail which goes all the way to georgetown. From there I have to ride with the traffic which is a bit unnerving. Besides I would prefer not to go via the trail when sunset is late as it is pitch dark along the trail. I have a garage at work with an area for bicycles so theft won't be a problem I hope.

I am very interested to giving commuting a shot but I need to take the first step (or pedal)!

Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
...I used to commute from my apartment in Mt Rainier, MD, next to the old movie theater that was then a church, by bicycle, in the 70's. Up route 1 to the U of MD, and down Rhode Island Ave into D.C. I found it was a marvelous way to get around back then, in the post streetcar, but pre Metro era of mass transit in Washington. There are a lot of things you will need to work out, like carrying stuff on the bike on racks in bags. And the whole theft thing is very discouraging. But if you can arrange a safe place to park your bike at work, it is very do-able. I commuted for many years by bike here in California, prior to retirement.

What's nice about it is that in a regular program of exercise, it allows you to take advantage of time that would otherwise be wasted, sitting in a car or on a bus. And if you can make it routine, it becomes a natural part of your exercise routine.
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Old 10-03-22, 06:31 AM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by big john View Post
Thanks for the correction. I got confused again! Even says made in Waterford on my Gunnar.
Speaking of Gunnars I didn’t know the history but I love mine. I would call it’s handling sporty, less relaxed than the Litespeed Arenberg it replaced.





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Old 10-03-22, 06:53 AM
  #58  
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Originally Posted by Shadco View Post
Speaking of Gunnars I didnít know the history but I love mine. I would call itís handling sporty, less relaxed than the Litespeed Arenberg it replaced.

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Mine is the Sport model. Longer wheelbase than the Roadie, lower BB, maybe a bit slacker head angle. Had it since 2006 but it has been relegated to a back up bike.
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