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1977 Peugeot PRN10 E rescue

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1977 Peugeot PRN10 E rescue

Old 12-12-20, 10:28 AM
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KenNC
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1977 Peugeot PRN10 E rescue

This was on our local Craigslist for $50 for nearly two weeks. Noticed the crankset and remnants of a Reynolds frame decal. I figured I had a seatpost and stem left over from a prior project that would probably fit so I picked it up at asking price. One bonus was, the seller included, in a separate bag, the original Simplex rear derailleur and drop-out spacers. Will post some more details shortly.
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Old 12-12-20, 12:15 PM
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So the good news was the PRN10 had a nice original wheelset with Super Champion clincher rims that hold a nice pressure, as well as the Stronglight 49D crankset, and the Simplex SX410 rear derailleur. But then also some odd original parts imho: The LARGE spoke protector with a 14-24 freewheel, and the steel Lyotard pedals, both seem on the heavy side for the bike. I kept the drive-train all Simplex, but with an earlier style shifter than the original, and a later style "alpha" front derailleur than the original. Along with a new KMC7Z chain it is actually shifting crisply and quietly, to my pleasant surprise! Gave it a good clean and polish, repacked all the bearings, replaced cables, hoods, tape and tires. Replaced pedals with Lyotard alloy pedals, which I think look good with this, though I've been made aware that they can have a fracture/failure problem and may look for something else. It isn't my size but I just enjoy putting survivors like this back into service in some semblance of their original form. I'll keep it for a loaner, or try to find a good home for it..

Also noticed that the fit of the rear tire is quite close, even with 27x1 tires. Understand it originally came with 27 x 1 1/4, which I can't picture fitting well at all. Wonder if the frame is really more optimum for 700 x 23-25, may pop in some of those at some point just out of curiosity....





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Old 12-12-20, 12:19 PM
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You did a really pretty job on this bike. I'm surprised that 27 x 1 is a tight fit on this bike. These bikes tend to have fairly generous tire clearance.
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Old 12-12-20, 12:25 PM
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I restored a similar bike a few years ago. Rode it a while, it was a very comfortable ride. Sold it for pretty good money. It was a little too big for me.

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Old 12-12-20, 12:49 PM
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Originally Posted by KenNC View Post
The fit of the rear tire is quite close, even with 27x1. Understand it originally came with 27 x 1 1/4... Wonder if the frame is really more optimum for 700c.
Can you remove the rear wheel with its tire fully inflated? I couldn't do that with a 27x1" tire on a '73 PR10. Your pics show the pads might reach 700c.
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Old 12-12-20, 01:17 PM
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Originally Posted by SurferRosa View Post
Can you remove the rear wheel with its tire fully inflated? I couldn't do that with a 27x1" tire on a '73 PR10. Your pics show the pads might reach 700c.
I have to pop off the straddle cable to do that--no big inconvenience there. Here are a couple pics showing the tire spacing. The brakes seem set at the top of their range (same for front) so I definitely think they could be adjusted down to 700. Note also where the tire sits in relation to the chain stay inner wall indentations, which also makes me think it is more optimized for a 700 wheel.

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Old 12-12-20, 02:33 PM
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Originally Posted by KenNC View Post
I have to pop off the straddle cable to do that.
Ah. The issue with my Peugeot I mentioned was clearing both the long horizontal dropouts and the chainstay bridge. Had to deflate the tire. But I ran it like that. Just couldn't inflate it before mounting after fixing a roadside flat. A tricky thing when relying on one CO2.
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Old 12-12-20, 11:36 PM
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Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
You did a really pretty job on this bike. I'm surprised that 27 x 1 is a tight fit on this bike. These bikes tend to have fairly generous tire clearance.
My 1980 PKN-10 (successor to the PR-10) is a bit tight with 27" wheels, but can handle 700Cx32, which is what my son uses with it now.
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Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
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Old 12-13-20, 03:56 PM
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It looks like in the past someone perhaps tried removing the rear derailer by turning the hex bolt, thus fracturing the spring in the mounting pivot.
Fully half of the world's Simplex derailers have been lost to such occurrences.
On some of these, the end of the hollow mounting bolt has simply sheared free of the stop plate, giving hope that the bolt can be re-tensioned by turning it clockwise, and then securing this position by tightening the lock-screw on the reverse end of the mounting bolt (located at the inside surface of the dropout).

I'm surprised that this frame would have been fitted with 27" wheels at the factory, but remembering that typical 27x1" "racing" tires of that era were typically only 20mm wide!

This bike appears to have very steep geometry, and if so will likely ride very twitchy using a shorter and/or raised stem. But being a smaller frame, the headtube angle may be moderate despite the appearance of relatively straight fork legs.

Last edited by dddd; 12-13-20 at 04:05 PM.
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Old 12-15-20, 11:06 AM
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As bought, funky brake levers, missing broken Simplex FD, replaced by Shimano Exage, works fine.

Current set up. Fun bike.



I ran a Sugino AT 52/34 as an interim set up till I found the Srronglight 99.

Pretty bike. I found this '78 PR10 with nearly perfect paint and decals, and paid the CL asking price of $400. It had incorrect funky brake levers, so I put on a couple of Campy aeros that I had, and swapped the crank to an English thread Stronglight 99, 52/40. It's a fun ride. I'd like to find an alloy seat post someday. Mine came with 700c Mavic MA40, on Normandy hubs. I'm running Pasela 28s, with no clearance issues, but I do have to disconnect the Mafac straddle cable to remove them.

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Old 12-24-20, 10:58 AM
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Originally Posted by dddd View Post
It looks like in the past someone perhaps tried removing the rear derailer by turning the hex bolt, thus fracturing the spring in the mounting pivot.
Fully half of the world's Simplex derailers have been lost to such occurrences.
On some of these, the end of the hollow mounting bolt has simply sheared free of the stop plate, giving hope that the bolt can be re-tensioned by turning it clockwise, and then securing this position by tightening the lock-screw on the reverse end of the mounting bolt (located at the inside surface of the dropout)..
I am glad you pointed this out. It was shifting smoothly on the stand and I didn't notice it, but yes the pulleys are very close to the 24t freewheel. I've fiddled with a couple of these derailleurs in the past, so took it back off. Nothing seemed broken, so I pried off the back plate, rotated the thru-bolt 180 degrees, and put the back plate back on (a bit of a PITA but do-able). Re-mounted it on the frame and it appears to have more tension. Don't know if it was assembled incorrectly at the factory, or if the spring had weakened over time. Anyway, thanks again!
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Old 12-24-20, 11:43 AM
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That is a radical looking stem. I like it. Also superchampion clincher rims are a big bonus. You did well at $50 for this bike.
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Old 12-24-20, 09:45 PM
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Originally Posted by KenNC View Post
I am glad you pointed this out. It was shifting smoothly on the stand and I didn't notice it, but yes the pulleys are very close to the 24t freewheel. I've fiddled with a couple of these derailleurs in the past, so took it back off. Nothing seemed broken, so I pried off the back plate, rotated the thru-bolt 180 degrees, and put the back plate back on (a bit of a PITA but do-able). Re-mounted it on the frame and it appears to have more tension. Don't know if it was assembled incorrectly at the factory, or if the spring had weakened over time. Anyway, thanks again!
I'm glad that you fiddled with it, and that the parts were all usable!

I fear that too many of these get tossed because owners may not investigate fully.

Anyway, great job on the derailer (and especially on the bike!).
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