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Tubeless Back to Tubes

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Tubeless Back to Tubes

Old 09-07-21, 05:41 PM
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Rdmonster69
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Tubeless Back to Tubes .....Update !!! Sticking With Tubeless for now

Apparently my new Domane came factory with tubeless as opposed to the stated tubeless ready. This doesn't look like its for me as it looks like a PITA.

My question is about the tubeless rim strip. Do I pull it or can it stay ? It looks a bit bulkier than a rim strip and I'm not sure how I would get it out.

Also not sure why it went flat.No damage to the tire that I can make out.

Last edited by Rdmonster69; 09-08-21 at 06:53 PM. Reason: Title Change
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Old 09-07-21, 05:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Rdmonster69 View Post
Apparently my new Domane came factory with tubeless as opposed to the stated tubeless ready. This doesn't look like its for me as it looks like a PITA.

My question is about the tubeless rim strip. Do I pull it or can it stay ? It looks a bit bulkier than a rim strip and I'm not sure how I would get it out.

Also not sure why it went flat.No damage to the tire that I can make out.
Before you remove the tubeless rim strip, make sure your wheel is not hookless and is thus compatible with clincher tires.
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Old 09-07-21, 05:50 PM
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Sure, IF its a hookless rim you must use a compatible TL ready tyre, but you can have a tube in it if you like.
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Old 09-07-21, 05:53 PM
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Really just curious if the plastic liner needs to be replaced ..... the tires came on the wheels so I am sure they will be fine. How do you tell if a rim is "hookless" ? Never had tubeless before.
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Old 09-07-21, 06:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Rdmonster69 View Post
Apparently my new Domane came factory with tubeless as opposed to the stated tubeless ready. This doesn't look like its for me as it looks like a PITA.

My question is about the tubeless rim strip. Do I pull it or can it stay ? It looks a bit bulkier than a rim strip and I'm not sure how I would get it out.

Also not sure why it went flat.No damage to the tire that I can make out.
Your Domane did not come from the factory set up tubeless. It may have been done at the dealer though. If you don't want to run tubeless, I would absolutely remove the Trek tubeless strips and install normal rim strips. The tubeless strips make changing tires a PITA on the side of the road and they are needless weight. To get them out, we use popsicle sticks flattened on one end. Once you get it worked under, it is easy to get the strips off. Make sure you put the normal rim strips in to protect your tubes.
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Old 09-07-21, 06:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Rdmonster69 View Post
Really just curious if the plastic liner needs to be replaced ..... the tires came on the wheels so I am sure they will be fine. How do you tell if a rim is "hookless" ? Never had tubeless before.
The liner is thinner than than the standard rim tape so no problem there. Ignore the hook versus hookless as your bike will be compatible with tubes. If you want put tubes in great however talk to your bike shop as tubeless is not as bad as the luddites which frequent this forum would lead you to believe. I love it and have toured and ridden thousands of km tubeless without a issue. No flats with a super supple performance tire.
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Old 09-07-21, 06:44 PM
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Last week I did two tubeless to tube conversions and yet another one today. All of them were done for casual riders who were sold on tubeless when they bought the bikes, but should not have been. Tubeless is great if your mindset is ripe for it.
I was all on board when it was introduced, but have soured to it as it is not near perfect enough for me to use it.
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Old 09-07-21, 06:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Atlas Shrugged View Post
The liner is thinner than than the standard rim tape so no problem there. Ignore the hook versus hookless as your bike will be compatible with tubes. If you want put tubes in great however talk to your bike shop as tubeless is not as bad as the luddites which frequent this forum would lead you to believe. I love it and have toured and ridden thousands of km tubeless without a issue. No flats with a super supple performance tire.
Yeah ......Im gonna give it a go and see if it seals up and so on....just not sure why it flatted in the first place. If I fail I will be ready with rim tape and tubes. It also popped half the bead off the rim after deflating ....not sure if thats common or not. Noticed it when I walked in.
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Old 09-07-21, 06:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Rdmonster69 View Post
Yeah ......Im gonna give it a go and see if it seals up and so on....just not sure why it flatted in the first place. If I fail I will be ready with rim tape and tubes. It also popped half the bead off the rim after deflating ....not sure if thats common or not. Noticed it when I walked in.
They may not have added sealant or it dried out. No need for rim tape, tubeless tape is thinner than standard. Just remove valve and drop a tube in when you want to change.
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Old 09-07-21, 06:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Atlas Shrugged View Post
They may not have added sealant or it dried out. No need for rim tape, tubeless tape is thinner than standard. Just remove valve and drop a tube in when you want to change.
Wrong. Bontrager rims don't use tubeless tape, they use a somewhat bulky plastic rim strip. If you're not tubeless it should be removed and replaced w/ either the 'normal' Bontrager rim strip or tape.
Just to throw my hat in, I can not stand tubeless on the road. Did it for years, had one cut tire and it was such a mess I went back to tubes as soon as I got home from that ride.
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Old 09-07-21, 07:09 PM
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Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
Wrong. Bontrager rims don't use tubeless tape, they use a somewhat bulky plastic rim strip. If you're not tubeless it should be removed and replaced w/ either the 'normal' Bontrager rim strip or tape.
Just to throw my hat in, I can not stand tubeless on the road. Did it for years, had one cut tire and it was such a mess I went back to tubes as soon as I got home from that ride.
“Wrong” Seems a bit harsh! Please explain why it needs to be replaced rather than the vague “should”?

To bad you let one bad experience after riding it for years ruin what could be a great improvement in your enjoyment of cycling.
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Old 09-07-21, 07:19 PM
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I'm sorry you're sensitive, I'll try find less harsh words next time. I know all about tubeless, it doesn't 'improve my enjoyment' of cycling at all. I run the same pressure in my clinchers that I would use in tubeless tires. The clinchers have better ride quality and I don't have to deal w/ the mess. As much as I think TL is the only way to go on the mountain bike I'll never use it again on the road. I rarely if ever flat so there's really no benefit.
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Old 09-07-21, 07:52 PM
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I appreciate all the input.I was quite surprised to see that they were already set up tubeless. I dont think I would have any problems with ride quality or PSI related flats if I change over to tubes. Still...I have everything I need and will take a stab at resealing the current set up. If it turns out to be a pain. I will have tubes and tape ready to go. No biggie.
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Old 09-07-21, 09:19 PM
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Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
I'm sorry you're sensitive, I'll try find less harsh words next time. I know all about tubeless, it doesn't 'improve my enjoyment' of cycling at all. I run the same pressure in my clinchers that I would use in tubeless tires. The clinchers have better ride quality and I don't have to deal w/ the mess. As much as I think TL is the only way to go on the mountain bike I'll never use it again on the road. I rarely if ever flat so there's really no benefit.
Other than the personal dig you didn’t answer what’s wrong with using the existing rim tape. While you are at it please explain how with tubes your ride quality improves?
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Old 09-07-21, 09:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Atlas Shrugged View Post
Other than the personal dig you didn’t answer what’s wrong with using the existing rim tape.
From OP's description, it's probably not tape.

Likely a TLR rimstrip:
https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/e...oaAvWzEALw_wcB
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Old 09-07-21, 09:31 PM
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Pay attention here, it's not the first time this has been posted.

There is no rim tape. No. Tape. There is a plastic strip that snaps into the center of the rim to make it 'tubeless compatible'. The ride quality is better w/ clinchers because tubeless tires have a heavier casing to hold air since there is no tube to do that job. The only tubeless tire that comes close is Vittoria...maybe Rene Herse as well. Nearly every TL tire is heavier than it's clincher model, that's why. Ride quality isn't really an issue for me as I never over-inflated my clinchers in the first place.
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Old 09-07-21, 10:33 PM
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Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
Pay attention here, it's not the first time this has been posted.

There is no rim tape. No. Tape. There is a plastic strip that snaps into the center of the rim to make it 'tubeless compatible'. The ride quality is better w/ clinchers because tubeless tires have a heavier casing to hold air since there is no tube to do that job. The only tubeless tire that comes close is Vittoria...maybe Rene Herse as well. Nearly every TL tire is heavier than it's clincher model, that's why. Ride quality isn't really an issue for me as I never over-inflated my clinchers in the first place.
Ok if you don’t use big words I may be able to understand. If you put a tube into a wheel with this plastic strip what problems would arise?
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Old 09-07-21, 10:37 PM
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Well, not to get bogged into the tubeless or not conversation which has been had ad nauseum (hope you enjoy it if you stick with it).

I was just going to say that sometimes tubeless will go flat (especially if sitting unused in heat for a bit) if no sealant is left. It’s happened to me once or twice in the 6 years I’ve been on them, and I’m notoriously bad at remembering to check sealant levels during our summers where my garage sits at 120 degrees lol. An ounce of sealant in each tire always fixes me up for about 5-6months.

good luck, I hope you enjoy the ride!
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Old 09-08-21, 08:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Atlas Shrugged View Post
To bad you let one bad experience after riding it for years ruin what could be a great improvement in your enjoyment of cycling.
Is tubeless really a 'great improvement in your enjoyment of cycling'? I run my gravel bike tubeless and...its fine. I run my tires probably 8psi lower than I used to when I rode gravel with tubes, but I currently run tires that are 3mm wider than before and weigh 20# less...so those differences probably offset the psi difference. My enjoyment has not gone up from running tubeless. I still ride the same roads as before and am not happier. To be clear, I am also no less happy compared to before.
I have never been in the middle of a ride and thought 'oh tubeless, where have you been all my life!' or anything like that.

I run my road bikes with tubes, because the rims are not tubeless ready and I have no motivation to spend money on new wheels when I dont flat as it is and my tires feel both comfortable and roll well. I have thought about going to latex tubes to see if I can notice any improvement that would offset the need to inflate more frequently.
Having tubeless on my main bike, I just dont see how it would greatly improve my enjoyment elsewhere.

I also run my tires, both tubeless and tube, at higher psi than Silca recommends. Eek!
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Old 09-08-21, 08:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Atlas Shrugged View Post
Ok if you don’t use big words I may be able to understand. If you put a tube into a wheel with this plastic strip what problems would arise?
Like I stated above, the plastic rim strip that Trek uses for tubeless makes tire changes a big PITA. It is also heavier. You can leave it but, we never do when we swap customers back to tubed rims. On my personal bike, I still run tubeless but, I didn't use the factory rim strip. I use DT Swiss tubeless tape on all my bikes, road and otherwise. It works perfect and doesn't make it such a PITA to change tires on the side of the road or trail if I get a flat.
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Old 09-08-21, 08:51 AM
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What I have learned thus far.

1.My Bontrager plastic rim shield should be removed and replaced with traditional tape if I wish to do more than switch to a tube when having a flat on the road.
2. Tubeless is not that awesome for road applications but may be worth a go if I don't mind taking a minute to learn the set up.
3. This subject is almost as contentious as "what do you wear when cycling" , "steel vs Carbon" , or frankly any other BF forum subject LoL.

My plan is to have a go at remounting the tubeless tire and see if it is much of an issue for me to get right. If it is an issue then F that and I will have tubes on hand. If it is easy then I will be on the side of "tubeless is the best , bow down to your new lord and master you tube using peasants" ....while keeping tubes handy : )
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Old 09-08-21, 08:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Rdmonster69 View Post
What I have learned thus far.

1.My Bontrager plastic rim shield should be removed and replaced with traditional tape if I wish to do more than switch to a tube when having a flat on the road.
2. Tubeless is not that awesome for road applications but may be worth a go if I don't mind taking a minute to learn the set up.
3. This subject is almost as contentious as "what do you wear when cycling" , "steel vs Carbon" , or frankly any other BF forum subject LoL.

My plan is to have a go at remounting the tubeless tire and see if it is much of an issue for me to get right. If it is an issue then F that and I will have tubes on hand. If it is easy then I will be on the side of "tubeless is the best , bow down to your new lord and master you tube using peasants" ....while keeping tubes handy : )
1, Absolutely.
2. Depends on you. If find it quite easy to deal with but like to maintain my bikes..
3. Absolutely.
4. DO NOT USE STANS SEALANT. It doesn't work at road pressures. I use Stans in my MTBs and Orange Seal in my road bikes.
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Old 09-08-21, 09:06 AM
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Originally Posted by yarbrough462 View Post
1, Absolutely.
2. Depends on you. If find it quite easy to deal with but like to maintain my bikes..
3. Absolutely.
4. DO NOT USE STANS SEALANT. It doesn't work at road pressures. I use Stans in my MTBs and Orange Seal in my road bikes.
I like to work on them almost as much as riding them !! I was just gonna write off the tubeless idea but decided it might be pretty cool to learn and I only have to buy sealant to take a stab at it. Also need to pick up some tubes so the whole thing will be worthwhile to experiment with. Thinking about a new MTB next year and it will most likely be tubeless so getting some experience is not a bad thing. Thanks for the tips.
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Old 09-08-21, 09:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Rdmonster69 View Post
2. Tubeless is not that awesome for road applications but may be worth a go if I don't mind taking a minute to learn the set up.
No. Tubeless *is* awesome, but only if you puncture regularly. It's a solution to address a problem.

Just as I wouldn't go to the dentist to get a filling unless I had a cavity, I wouldn't go tubeless unless experience told me that I'd get a flat every few hundred miles.

For those who get punctures, tubeless is a way to ride great feeling tires rather than resort to some horrible, armored jobbers.
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Old 09-08-21, 10:13 AM
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
No. Tubeless *is* awesome, but only if you puncture regularly. It's a solution to address a problem.

Just as I wouldn't go to the dentist to get a filling unless I had a cavity, I wouldn't go tubeless unless experience told me that I'd get a flat every few hundred miles.

For those who get punctures, tubeless is a way to ride great feeling tires rather than resort to some horrible, armored jobbers.
I had two flats this spring that both appeared to be the result of using tire levers on the install and again at the side of the road. I know , I know but the buggers were super hard to get on !! I was able to man handle them after they had gone on a few times. That was my old bike using Michelin Power Roads, love the tires BTW. I usually average maybe one flat a year but am always prepared. I ride a fair amount on a canal towpath that is hard crushed limestone and some of the shads can be pretty sharp.

If I didn't want to at least try the tubeless set up that came with the bike I would have no problem switching to tubes. If I have issues (tire issues , personal issues are a different topic) I will in a heartbeat as along with sealant I will be getting everything to switch it over just in case.
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