Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fitting Your Bike
Reload this Page >

Fit adjustment to relieve calf soreness?

Notices
Fitting Your Bike Are you confused about how you should fit a bike to your particular body dimensions? Have you been reading, found the terms Merxx or French Fit, and donít know what you need? Every style of riding is different- in how you fit the bike to you, and the sizing of the bike itself. Itís more than just measuring your height, reach and inseam. With the help of Bike Fitting, youíll be able to find the right fit for your frame size, style of riding, and your particular dimensions. Here yaí goÖ..the location for everything fit related.

Fit adjustment to relieve calf soreness?

Old 12-11-22, 07:25 AM
  #1  
rbrides
Curmudgeon
Thread Starter
 
rbrides's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Triangle NC
Posts: 297

Bikes: Specialized Diverge Comp

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 128 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 21 Posts
Fit adjustment to relieve calf soreness?

My calfs become sore and tight after rides. But not any other muscles. What aspects of bike fit could address this?
rbrides is offline  
Old 12-11-22, 05:04 PM
  #2  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 18,869

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 113 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3573 Post(s)
Liked 1,568 Times in 1,145 Posts
My guess is that your saddle is too high, forcing you to pedal toes down. If you have a trainer, you could set up a mirror beside you or have someone video you as you pedal. The sole of your shoe should be level at the bottom of the pedal stroke.

It's also possible that you saddle is not too high, but rather that you pedal toes down by habit.

It's also possible that you are "ankling" during the pedal stroke. "Ankling" means flexing your ankle during the downstroke. Relax your ankle all the way around the pedal circle, except lift your toe just before your foot goes over the top.

The other cure is to leave your fit alone and simply do one-legged, full-range-of-motion calf raises on a stair step. Put the ball of your foot on the stair, a couple fingers on a wall, the other foot hooked behind the ankle of the active foot, and go at it. Bombproof is being able to do one set of 30 of those with each leg. Do it every other day until you can do 30. I'm 77, not skinny, and I can do 30. Haven't had a calf issue since I started doing that.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Likes For Carbonfiberboy:
Old 12-12-22, 05:58 AM
  #3  
rbrides
Curmudgeon
Thread Starter
 
rbrides's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Triangle NC
Posts: 297

Bikes: Specialized Diverge Comp

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 128 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 21 Posts
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
My guess is that your saddle is too high, forcing you to pedal toes down. If you have a trainer, you could set up a mirror beside you or have someone video you as you pedal. The sole of your shoe should be level at the bottom of the pedal stroke.

It's also possible that you saddle is not too high, but rather that you pedal toes down by habit.

It's also possible that you are "ankling" during the pedal stroke. "Ankling" means flexing your ankle during the downstroke. Relax your ankle all the way around the pedal circle, except lift your toe just before your foot goes over the top.

The other cure is to leave your fit alone and simply do one-legged, full-range-of-motion calf raises on a stair step. Put the ball of your foot on the stair, a couple fingers on a wall, the other foot hooked behind the ankle of the active foot, and go at it. Bombproof is being able to do one set of 30 of those with each leg. Do it every other day until you can do 30. I'm 77, not skinny, and I can do 30. Haven't had a calf issue since I started doing that.
great input. I particularly like checking that the sole of my foot is level at the bottom. Makes great sense but Iíve not thought of that. Ankling and naturally pedaling toes-down are likely, and to me, interrelated, because of over-developed calfs from a previous past career.

Iíll video myself to look for and assess my technique. Thank you.
rbrides is offline  
Likes For rbrides:
Old 12-12-22, 08:57 AM
  #4  
rbrides
Curmudgeon
Thread Starter
 
rbrides's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Triangle NC
Posts: 297

Bikes: Specialized Diverge Comp

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 128 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 21 Posts
Also this.

Yes, the internet has LOTS of posts about calf muscle + cycling. But I greatly respect the Bike Forum members and always like the wisdom from this community.
rbrides is offline  
Old 12-12-22, 10:24 AM
  #5  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 18,869

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 113 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3573 Post(s)
Liked 1,568 Times in 1,145 Posts
Originally Posted by rbrides View Post
great input. I particularly like checking that the sole of my foot is level at the bottom. Makes great sense but Iíve not thought of that. Ankling and naturally pedaling toes-down are likely, and to me, interrelated, because of over-developed calfs from a previous past career.

Iíll video myself to look for and assess my technique. Thank you.
Agree, but can you do the 30 reps with those big calves? Fun story . . . at a previous gym, now long out of business because of OTC distribution of drugs, a big guy was doing 2-legged standing calf raises with 1000 lbs. I asked "Why so much weight?" He said, "Gotta stimulate 'em." That phrase has stuck with me. Yeah, gotta stimulate 'em. Fits a lot of situations.

And thanks for the vote of confidence for the many wonderful, knowledgeable cyclists who take the time to post here. This is not Twitter - most of the time.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Likes For Carbonfiberboy:
Old 12-12-22, 05:06 PM
  #6  
Iride01 
more daylight today!
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 12,474

Bikes: Tarmac Disc Comp Di2 - 2020

Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5111 Post(s)
Liked 3,605 Times in 2,502 Posts
I might also wonder if your cleats are too far forward on your shoes or if you don't use cleats, then are your feet too far back on the pedal. That longer distance from the pedal spindle to the ankle joint will mean your calf muscles will be having to deal with a lot of the power you put into the pedals.

Although it'll feel funny for more than several rides, moving your foot forward on the pedal might help.

Otherwise Carbonfiberboy covered the better possibility IMO.
Iride01 is offline  
Likes For Iride01:
Old 12-13-22, 05:26 AM
  #7  
PeteHski
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 4,995
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2520 Post(s)
Liked 2,709 Times in 1,708 Posts
I'll second the idea of moving your cleats more rearward (assuming you are clipped in). It definitely reduces calf stress.
PeteHski is online now  
Likes For PeteHski:
Old 12-15-22, 04:29 AM
  #8  
rbrides
Curmudgeon
Thread Starter
 
rbrides's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Triangle NC
Posts: 297

Bikes: Specialized Diverge Comp

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 128 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 21 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
I might also wonder if your cleats are too far forward on your shoes or if you don't use cleats, then are your feet too far back on the pedal. That longer distance from the pedal spindle to the ankle joint will mean your calf muscles will be having to deal with a lot of the power you put into the pedals.

Although it'll feel funny for more than several rides, moving your foot forward on the pedal might help.

Otherwise Carbonfiberboy covered the better possibility IMO.
thanks for participating. My cleats are as far back as they will go. I sometime wonder if they are too far back!
rbrides is offline  
Old 12-15-22, 04:41 AM
  #9  
rbrides
Curmudgeon
Thread Starter
 
rbrides's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Triangle NC
Posts: 297

Bikes: Specialized Diverge Comp

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 128 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 21 Posts

here is a link to video of my pedal stroke. Gee, it sure looks like I’m pointing my toes down.
rbrides is offline  
Old 12-15-22, 05:14 AM
  #10  
rbrides
Curmudgeon
Thread Starter
 
rbrides's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Triangle NC
Posts: 297

Bikes: Specialized Diverge Comp

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 128 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 21 Posts
Here is the video in slow motion.

rbrides is offline  
Old 12-15-22, 09:38 AM
  #11  
Iride01 
more daylight today!
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 12,474

Bikes: Tarmac Disc Comp Di2 - 2020

Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5111 Post(s)
Liked 3,605 Times in 2,502 Posts
Originally Posted by rbrides View Post
thanks for participating. My cleats are as far back as they will go. I sometime wonder if they are too far back!
Why wonder? Just move them forward a little and see if you prefer that.

If your rides are all about how well you perform, you might double check your data for a dozen rides before and after changing to see if it's affected your numbers. Otherwise your own personal comfort is all that matters.
Iride01 is offline  
Likes For Iride01:
Old 12-15-22, 09:43 AM
  #12  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 18,869

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 113 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3573 Post(s)
Liked 1,568 Times in 1,145 Posts
Yeah, you do ankle just a little at the bottom of the stroke. Try relaxing your ankles and feeling for your heel cups during the downstroke. The thing to watch in the video is the change in angle between the foot and lower leg, rather than the angle of the foot w/r to the horizontal. I've always had my pedal axle under my big toe knuckle. Exact position of the pedal axle shouldn't matter to your calves if you ankle is relaxed during most of the pedal stroke. And your calves are not that big. I ride with guys with bigger calves than that. Nice definition.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Likes For Carbonfiberboy:
Old 12-15-22, 09:46 AM
  #13  
Chuck Naill
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: US
Posts: 680
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 356 Post(s)
Liked 97 Times in 70 Posts
Originally Posted by rbrides View Post
My calfs become sore and tight after rides. But not any other muscles. What aspects of bike fit could address this?
The pain is not while riding?
Chuck Naill is offline  
Old 12-15-22, 10:00 AM
  #14  
rbrides
Curmudgeon
Thread Starter
 
rbrides's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Triangle NC
Posts: 297

Bikes: Specialized Diverge Comp

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 128 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 21 Posts
Originally Posted by Chuck Naill View Post
The pain is not while riding?
No pain while riding. My calves fatigue on extended rides or climbs (70 miles, or 4500 ft climbing or various, more difficult gravel routes). I guess fatigue can be considered painful but it is most often that evening/night after or next day.
To me, the symptom getting my attention is that it is always my calves and only my calves. I can do a century ride and no other muscle is bothered by it.
rbrides is offline  
Old 12-15-22, 10:26 AM
  #15  
Chuck Naill
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: US
Posts: 680
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 356 Post(s)
Liked 97 Times in 70 Posts
Originally Posted by rbrides View Post
No pain while riding. My calves fatigue on extended rides or climbs (70 miles, or 4500 ft climbing or various, more difficult gravel routes). I guess fatigue can be considered painful but it is most often that evening/night after or next day.
To me, the symptom getting my attention is that it is always my calves and only my calves. I can do a century ride and no other muscle is bothered by it.
Okay, was thinking about intermittent claudication for which pain is felt during exercise.
Chuck Naill is offline  
Old 12-17-22, 11:31 AM
  #16  
phughes
Senior Member
 
phughes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 2,719
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 869 Post(s)
Liked 1,012 Times in 579 Posts
Originally Posted by rbrides View Post
https://youtu.be/igFPLZEPyR4

here is a link to video of my pedal stroke. Gee, it sure looks like Iím pointing my toes down.
I believe your seat is too high. The back of your knee seems to accelerate at the bottom of the stroke, which means you basically lose control of the motion instead of being able to pedal smoothly throughout the circle. You are also toes down.

Keep in mind the trick of setting seat height at the bottom of the stroke is misleading. I set mine with the crank in line with the seat tube, which extends your leg more than with the pedal perpendicular to the floor.

I had mine set similar to yours when I first set up my touring bike. That resulted in and injured Achilles tendon. It was swollen and sore. After lowering the seat it has never been and issue since.
phughes is offline  
Likes For phughes:
Old 12-17-22, 02:52 PM
  #17  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 18,869

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 113 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3573 Post(s)
Liked 1,568 Times in 1,145 Posts
Originally Posted by phughes View Post
I believe your seat is too high. The back of your knee seems to accelerate at the bottom of the stroke, which means you basically lose control of the motion instead of being able to pedal smoothly throughout the circle. You are also toes down. That and feeling for your heel cup should fix you right up.

Keep in mind the trick of setting seat height at the bottom of the stroke is misleading. I set mine with the crank in line with the seat tube, which extends your leg more than with the pedal perpendicular to the floor.

I had mine set similar to yours when I first set up my touring bike. That resulted in and injured Achilles tendon. It was swollen and sore. After lowering the seat it has never been and issue since.
I guess - check it out on Myvelofit, eh?

See what your knee ankle is with your current saddle height, then lower saddle. You might use the heel-on-pedal method rather than measuring - google. Then recheck that knee angle with the app, with your foot more or less level at the bottom.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 12-18-22, 09:27 AM
  #18  
Road Fan
Senior Member
 
Road Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 16,448

Bikes: 1980 Masi, 1984 Mondonico, 1984 Trek 610, 1980 Woodrup Giro, 2005 Mondonico Futura Leggera ELOS, 1967 PX10E, 1971 Peugeot UO-8

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1683 Post(s)
Liked 550 Times in 413 Posts
Originally Posted by phughes View Post
I believe your seat is too high. The back of your knee seems to accelerate at the bottom of the stroke, which means you basically lose control of the motion instead of being able to pedal smoothly throughout the circle. You are also toes down.

Keep in mind the trick of setting seat height at the bottom of the stroke is misleading. I set mine with the crank in line with the seat tube, which extends your leg more than with the pedal perpendicular to the floor.

I had mine set similar to yours when I first set up my touring bike. That resulted in and injured Achilles tendon. It was swollen and sore. After lowering the seat it has never been and issue since.
I think this is a strong possibility. I usually interpret post-workout pain (especially after yoga but when I cycle or take long walks as well) as the breakdown of muscle which has been stressed by the workout, and which needs to recover and rebuild. A saddle too high could cause excessive calf flexing especially if there is that knee acceleration - your knee is trying to keep up with your foot to pedal contact point. I think of two approaches - reduce saddle height to make sure your foot contact remains easy. No knee straightening to stay in pedal contact, and no high knee pressure or foot pressure at bottom dead center. If you're trying to drive your foot through the pedal at bottom, your saddle needs to edge up bit by bit, but not so much that you start to rock your pelvis side to side. It can be a fine line.

Moving your saddle fore or aft can also subtly affect knee extension, as can adjusting saddle tilt, or moving your foot fore or aft on the pedal such as by a cleat adjustment.

My yoga teacher has suggested that after a session (90 minutes) we eat some protein (remember the old advice to eat a Clif bar within 30 minutes after a ride to improve recovery?) to help realize successive subtle increases in strength throughout your body. In yoga the strength improvement helps with balances such as the classic one-legged Tree Pose, and the bent-knee full-weight poses such as Warriors 1 through 3, not to mention the dozens of others. The added strength improves balance by strengthening all those little muscles in your foot and calf and that enables you to connect your drive forces into your pedals. It seems that protein supports regrowth of muscle, exchanging tired 70 year old muscle tissue for young, new muscle tissue (even for septuagenarians!). While I still get sore muscles, yoga is like cycling - when you achieve any given level, it only enables you to seek the next one.
Road Fan is offline  
Old 12-19-22, 04:46 AM
  #19  
rbrides
Curmudgeon
Thread Starter
 
rbrides's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Triangle NC
Posts: 297

Bikes: Specialized Diverge Comp

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 128 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 21 Posts
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
I guess - check it out on Myvelofit, eh?

See what your knee ankle is with your current saddle height, then lower saddle. You might use the heel-on-pedal method rather than measuring - google. Then recheck that knee angle with the app, with your foot more or less level at the bottom.
I posted the question in a different BF group if anyone recommended that app, myvelofit. What is your opinion of it?
rbrides is offline  
Old 12-19-22, 04:51 AM
  #20  
rbrides
Curmudgeon
Thread Starter
 
rbrides's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Triangle NC
Posts: 297

Bikes: Specialized Diverge Comp

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 128 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 21 Posts
Originally Posted by Road Fan View Post
I think this is a strong possibility. I usually interpret post-workout pain (especially after yoga but when I cycle or take long walks as well) as the breakdown of muscle which has been stressed by the workout, and which needs to recover and rebuild. A saddle too high could cause excessive calf flexing especially if there is that knee acceleration - your knee is trying to keep up with your foot to pedal contact point. I think of two approaches - reduce saddle height to make sure your foot contact remains easy. No knee straightening to stay in pedal contact, and no high knee pressure or foot pressure at bottom dead center. If you're trying to drive your foot through the pedal at bottom, your saddle needs to edge up bit by bit, but not so much that you start to rock your pelvis side to side. It can be a fine line.

Moving your saddle fore or aft can also subtly affect knee extension, as can adjusting saddle tilt, or moving your foot fore or aft on the pedal such as by a cleat adjustment.

My yoga teacher has suggested that after a session (90 minutes) we eat some protein (remember the old advice to eat a Clif bar within 30 minutes after a ride to improve recovery?) to help realize successive subtle increases in strength throughout your body. In yoga the strength improvement helps with balances such as the classic one-legged Tree Pose, and the bent-knee full-weight poses such as Warriors 1 through 3, not to mention the dozens of others. The added strength improves balance by strengthening all those little muscles in your foot and calf and that enables you to connect your drive forces into your pedals. It seems that protein supports regrowth of muscle, exchanging tired 70 year old muscle tissue for young, new muscle tissue (even for septuagenarians!). While I still get sore muscles, yoga is like cycling - when you achieve any given level, it only enables you to seek the next one.
great input. I do yoga a few time a week and agree with your comments.
rbrides is offline  
Old 12-19-22, 11:01 AM
  #21  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 18,869

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 113 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3573 Post(s)
Liked 1,568 Times in 1,145 Posts
Originally Posted by Road Fan View Post
I think this is a strong possibility. I usually interpret post-workout pain (especially after yoga but when I cycle or take long walks as well) as the breakdown of muscle which has been stressed by the workout, and which needs to recover and rebuild. A saddle too high could cause excessive calf flexing especially if there is that knee acceleration - your knee is trying to keep up with your foot to pedal contact point. I think of two approaches - reduce saddle height to make sure your foot contact remains easy. No knee straightening to stay in pedal contact, and no high knee pressure or foot pressure at bottom dead center. If you're trying to drive your foot through the pedal at bottom, your saddle needs to edge up bit by bit, but not so much that you start to rock your pelvis side to side. It can be a fine line.

Moving your saddle fore or aft can also subtly affect knee extension, as can adjusting saddle tilt, or moving your foot fore or aft on the pedal such as by a cleat adjustment.

My yoga teacher has suggested that after a session (90 minutes) we eat some protein (remember the old advice to eat a Clif bar within 30 minutes after a ride to improve recovery?) to help realize successive subtle increases in strength throughout your body. In yoga the strength improvement helps with balances such as the classic one-legged Tree Pose, and the bent-knee full-weight poses such as Warriors 1 through 3, not to mention the dozens of others. The added strength improves balance by strengthening all those little muscles in your foot and calf and that enables you to connect your drive forces into your pedals. It seems that protein supports regrowth of muscle, exchanging tired 70 year old muscle tissue for young, new muscle tissue (even for septuagenarians!). While I still get sore muscles, yoga is like cycling - when you achieve any given level, it only enables you to seek the next one.
So true. I don't do yoga, I work out in a gym, but the effect of strength on balance is very clear.

Unfortunately, we don't get new muscle tissue. We have what we're born with. The cells do get larger, though. It's not just muscle. More importantly it's the neuromuscular connections which are stimulated by operating said muscles. A few weeks in the gym and the pedals feel much lighter.
A muscle can grow in three ways: its fibers can increase in number, in length, or in girth. Because skeletal muscle fibers are unable to divide, more of them can be made only by the fusion of myoblasts, and the adult number of multinucleated skeletal muscle fibers is in fact attained earlyóbefore birth, in humans.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK26853/

There have been some quite cruel experiments with birds (dinosaurs) which show that their flying muscle fibers can be encouraged to divide and create new muscle fibers rather than simply making those fibers larger. We mammals can't do that.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Likes For Carbonfiberboy:
Old 12-22-22, 11:07 AM
  #22  
oldbobcat
Senior Member
 
oldbobcat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Boulder County, CO
Posts: 3,924

Bikes: '80 Masi Gran Criterium, '12 Trek Madone, early '60s Frejus track

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 350 Post(s)
Liked 284 Times in 215 Posts
You might want to move your cleats back a bit and lower the saddle a couple millimeters to compensate. You might be riding toes-down to because the saddle is too high, to shorten the force arm of your foot, to stabilize your heel, or a combination of the above. Also, check the cleat angle. I've found that riding pigeon-toed (toes pointing inward) can strain the outside of the foot, ankle, and calf and inhibit the flexibility to drop the heel.
oldbobcat is offline  
Likes For oldbobcat:
Old 12-24-22, 06:06 PM
  #23  
DaveSSS 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Loveland, CO
Posts: 6,979

Bikes: Cinelli superstar disc, two Yoeleo R12

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 936 Post(s)
Liked 488 Times in 393 Posts
I'm wondering how your saddle setback was determined. KOP is often recommended, but I've always used a further back position, since I do a lot of climbing. Your do look to be pedaling too much toes down, which might mean you're saddle is too high. I've got well developed calf muscles too, but never have calf soreness. I've been surprised have some of today's best pro GC riders don't have big calves.
​​​​​​
DaveSSS is offline  
Likes For DaveSSS:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.