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Help with bikes

Old 07-20-21, 10:07 PM
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Camron
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Help with bikes

Trying to decide on a bike. I was looking at suteki but I am looking for speed so now looking at a sonoma cn1 27 speed or a peugot but I was waiting a response on gears. I want speed that's what I'm looking for the Sonoma asking price was 290 they will take 150 from the research I have some it retailed for 1500. Here's the info I have found Swift and agile, the Sonoma CN1 is a performance road bike designed for the serious rider. Built with a lightweight 7000 series aluminum and carbon fiber frame, it’s made for those who seek a responsive ride out on the open road. The CN1 offers a 27-speed Shimano Tiagra Drivetrain components and brakes, carbon fiber fork, racing saddle with cromoly rails, Shimano WH-500 wheel set with Kenda tires and so much more. If you’re looking to test your riding skills at a higher level, check out the CN1 to discover what “beyond limits” is all about. Component Frame 7000 series aluminum, triple butted, w/Carbon fiber seat & chain stays Fork Carbon F13, 700C x F26.8mm x 100mm, weight: 418g, Carbon fork blades & Alloy steerer Saddle Cionlli # 6100 w/Cromoly rails Handlebar Alloy/Carbon, Width: 420mm Derailleur Shimano Tiagra 27-Speed F: FD-4503, R: RD-4500 Stem Alloy/Carbon, Ext: 100mm, Rise: deg. 7 Rims & Hubs F&R: Shimano WH-R500 Wheel Set, w/Quick Release Lever Tires Kenda Koncept 700cx23c Spokes Shimano F: 14Gx20, R: 14Gx24 Pedals None Grips EVA Foam, Black w/Silver plugs Brake Shimano Tiagra BR-4500, Dual pivot caliper brakes Brake & Shifter Levers Shimano Tiagra ST-4500 Crank & Sprocket Shimano Tiagra FC-4503, 3pc 30x39x50T B.B. Parts Shimano Tiagra Freewheel Shimano Tiagra 9-speed Head Parts Neco, Semi-Integrated 1-1/8” sealed bearing cartridge Chain Shimano HG73 super narrow Seatpost Alloy 6061 series, length: 10"

Last edited by Camron; 07-21-21 at 02:10 AM. Reason: More Info
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Old 07-20-21, 10:33 PM
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If you're looking for speed I'm going to guess none of them are all that great. Sound like mostly 80s mid to low level bikes. Not that they aren't good bikes for general use but I doubt they'll be all that fast. Personally if looking for a regular rider that I'd like to go quicker with I'd want at least 8 gears in the back getting into cassette wheels, 7sp could be cassette or freewheel, but 7sp cassette wheels are an annoyance to deal with. 8sp to 10sp road wheels all use the same dimensions making replacement stuff easier and cheaper to acquire.
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Old 07-21-21, 07:18 PM
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It was quite difficult to read your post but from what I could see it looks like some lower mid level parts on some random frames. Nothing that exciting. Generally when you start seeing Neco you aren't going to get much of quality.

Please learn to space things out a bit and make it a bit more readable..
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Old 07-21-21, 11:16 PM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
It was quite difficult to read your post but from what I could see it looks like some lower mid level parts on some random frames. Nothing that exciting. Generally when you start seeing Neco you aren't going to get much of quality.

Please learn to space things out a bit and make it a bit more readable..
Sorry bout that I just copy and pasted from a another site. So maybe not worth the 150?
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Old 07-21-21, 11:52 PM
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The Sonoma CN1 sounds like an interesting bike.

Stock Photo:


Nothing particularly extraordinary, but not a bad starter bike.

If it is in decent enough shape, the groupset may be worth more than the $150 asking price.

I'm not seeing an age. Perhaps around 2005?

Do you have your height, and the bike size?

Anyway, if it is in good shape and FITS YOU, then it wouldn't be bad.
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Old 07-22-21, 04:41 AM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
The Sonoma CN1 sounds like an interesting bike.

Stock Photo:


Nothing particularly extraordinary, but not a bad starter bike.

If it is in decent enough shape, the groupset may be worth more than the $150 asking price.

I'm not seeing an age. Perhaps around 2005?

Do you have your height, and the bike size?

Anyway, if it is in good shape and FITS YOU, then it wouldn't be bad.
I am 511 I don't have a size of the bike he says he bought it brand new 9 years ago it looks like it's in great shape probably stored indoors. His original asking price was 280 so o got the price down a bit but that's because bikes really don't sell well around here I have seen it up for over a month now maybe longer from the Info I have found it retailed for 1500. So I'm thinking it would be a great deal. I really shouldn't spend that much on a bike but I want something that can me some 10 mile - 20 mile+ rides with ease I have had a road bike before but I think it was just an older cheap bike it got me 20+ rides it was a pain but did it. but I know it was not a 27 speed o feel like a 27 would make things a bit easier plus it's a lighter frame the carbon and aluminum is what got me intrested
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Old 07-22-21, 06:52 AM
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Tiagra 4500 stuff was pretty good, and quite functional, so that's a plus.

The frame is okay, but nothing special. Schwinn's bike shop line of frames included an approximation of this model 13 years ago, because I rode with a fellow who had one. Decent enough bike.

What you are unable to answer is the size of the one that's for sale. At 5'11" with normal proportions, you should be looking at a 56-57 cm frame. Top tube should be in the 565 range. You could ride a 58 cm frame if the geometry gave a shorter top tube and you adjusted the stem reach accordingly. Measure first. Ride next. Calculate what changes will be necessary to make it fit. Adjust offer accordingly. Buy or walk away based on that. If the frame is much smaller than 56, then it's a "no".
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Old 07-22-21, 07:02 AM
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I say that if you want fast-lightweight-cheap, then you could easily find a mid-to-late 90's Cannondale relatively easily. They are stiff and light, and they transmit most of what you apply to the pedals. A good choice in my opinion.
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Old 07-22-21, 10:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Camron View Post
I am 511 I don't have a size of the bike
Next step is to ask about the size. No point in looking any further until you establish this.
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Old 07-22-21, 10:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Camron View Post
Info I have found it retailed for 1500.
I found a couple of notes saying "Sonoma Bicycle Company closed back in late 2009." Apparently a California company, or store. That would make your bike likely over a dozen years old... that is if it is the same store/company.

I think I found the same auction site you found. Unfortunately the actual sale price was obscured. Without other confirmation, I take former price estimates with a gain of salt.

Nonetheless, it is hard to go wrong with any bike with "brifters" for $150, especially if less than 10 years old.

One note. The aluminum bikes from about 2000 to 2010 got a reputation as bone shakers. Older aluminum bikes had too much flex, and newer ones apparently were a bit better, but those in the middle were stiff. I'm not sure I've actually ridden one myself. Some can be adjusted by getting the tire pressure just right.
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Old 07-22-21, 10:54 AM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
Next step is to ask about the size. No point in looking any further until you establish this.
The bike may have the size written on the frame.

If the top tube is horizontal, then the way to measure is from the middle of the cranks/bottom bracket to the top of the top tube along the seat tube (sometimes to the top of the seatpost mast part of the frame). If in inches, convert to centimeters.

Then measure from the middle of the seat tube to the middle of the head tube along the top tube.

As @Phil_gretz suggests, somewhere around 56 to 57 cm would be good for someone who is 5'11".

I believe there is some flexibility, but I wouldn't go much under 56cm.

If your bike looks like that photo I pulled off the web, it is probably close enough. Look where the top tube and downtube meet at the head tube.
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Old 07-22-21, 01:35 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
The bike may have the size written on the frame.

If the top tube is horizontal, then the way to measure is from the middle of the cranks/bottom bracket to the top of the top tube along the seat tube (sometimes to the top of the seatpost mast part of the frame). If in inches, convert to centimeters.

Then measure from the middle of the seat tube to the middle of the head tube along the top tube.

As @Phil_gretz suggests, somewhere around 56 to 57 cm would be good for someone who is 5'11".

I believe there is some flexibility, but I wouldn't go much under 56cm.

If your bike looks like that photo I pulled off the web, it is probably close enough. Look where the top tube and downtube meet at the head tube.
It looks exactly like the picture. It's the same bike. I'll try toeasuer it or ask about him if he knows. I'm kinda confused on where to measure from. I'm not the best on bike terms.
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Old 07-22-21, 01:45 PM
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To echo the point others have made...Nothing else will matter if it's not the right size for you. Like an article of clothing, or a pair of shoes, a bike has to be the right size for your body, or you are sacrificing comfort and/or performance.
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Old 07-22-21, 01:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Camron View Post
It looks exactly like the picture. It's the same bike. I'll try to measuer it or ask about him if he knows. I'm kinda confused on where to measure from. I'm not the best on bike terms.
If it looks "exactly" like the photo (other than color?), then it is probably fine.

This article discusses a lot of details about measuring.
https://www.bikeradar.com/advice/buy...sizing-a-bike/

But, the two primary measurements for size are the length of the seat tube from the center of the crank/bottom bracket to either the top of the top tube, or top of the seatpost extension mast. MIDDLE TO TOP



And also measure the top tube from the middle of the seat tube to the middle of the head tube. (as noted in the article, some people follow an imaginary line for a horizontal top tube, finishing in the seat post). MIDDLE TO MIDDLE



In many cases those two numbers will be similar. At least if one had a horizontal top tube. Having a sloping top tube throws everything out of whack (which is why the length of the top tube can be important).

Ultimately, if you can stand over the frame, with the tip toes hitting the ground, you can fit on the seat, and reach the bars, you'll probably be OK... but better, at least stand over the frame mostly flat-footed.
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Old 07-22-21, 02:07 PM
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[QUOTE=CliffordK;22153326]If it looks "exactly" like the photo (other than color?), then it is probably fine.

This article discusses a lot of details about measuring.

But, the two primary measurements for size are the length of the seat tube from the center of the crank/bottom bracket to either the top of the top tube, or top of the seatpost extension mast. MIDDLE TO TOP



And also measure the top tube from the middle of the seat tube to the middle of the head tube. (as noted in the article, some people follow an imaginary line for a horizontal top tube, finishing in the seat post). MIDDLE TO MIDDLE



In many cases those two numbers will be similar. At least if one had a horizontal top tube. Having a sloping top tube throws everything out of whack (which is why the length of the top tube can be important).

Ultimately, if you can stand over the frame, with the tip toes hitting the ground, you can fit on the seat, and reach the bars, you'll probably be OK... but better, at least stand over the frame mostly flat-footed.[/QUOTE
It is the exactly the same bike same color too they just changed the handle bars to standard bike bars rather than road bars
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Old 07-22-21, 02:10 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
If it looks "exactly" like the photo (other than color?), then it is probably fine.

This article discusses a lot of details about measuring.


But, the two primary measurements for size are the length of the seat tube from the center of the crank/bottom bracket to either the top of the top tube, or top of the seatpost extension mast. MIDDLE TO TOP



And also measure the top tube from the middle of the seat tube to the middle of the head tube. (as noted in the article, some people follow an imaginary line for a horizontal top tube, finishing in the seat post). MIDDLE TO MIDDLE



In many cases those two numbers will be similar. At least if one had a horizontal top tube. Having a sloping top tube throws everything out of whack (which is why the length of the top tube can be important).

Ultimately, if you can stand over the frame, with the tip toes hitting the ground, you can fit on the seat, and reach the bars, you'll probably be OK... but better, at least stand over the frame mostly flat-footed.


im trying to post pics but it won't let me
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Old 07-22-21, 02:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Camron View Post
It is the exactly the same bike same color too they just changed the handle bars to standard bike bars rather than road bars
Standard bars? I thought the bike above had "standard bars".

EDIT... The bars above appear to be original, with possibly added clamp-on TT/Tri bars that can be removed if desired.

I had written about possibly changed shifters, but that isn't he case.

Last edited by CliffordK; 07-22-21 at 02:34 PM.
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Old 07-22-21, 02:21 PM
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Now that you have 10 posts, you may be able to add photos, or edit posts with photos. However:

@Camron's Album:
https://www.bikeforums.net/g/user/542487
https://www.bikeforums.net/g/album/21971304



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Old 07-22-21, 02:28 PM
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I don't see any glaring issues with the Sonoma. My guess is it has had a fair amount of use.

Those are the standard "drop bars" as in the photo above (so ignore the comment about the brakes).

It does appear that it may also have removable TT/Tri bars attached, but not visible. You can research those if you wish.

It also has "clipless pedals". You can ride those with normal shoes for a test ride, but you'll eventually want to either get clipless shoes to use those, or flat pedals (or a different model of Clipless).

The bike appears to be in the middle front, small rear sprockets, and the chain may be slightly too loose (but easy enough to fix).

The size is probably fine for you.

Last edited by CliffordK; 07-22-21 at 02:34 PM.
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Old 07-22-21, 02:45 PM
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More (better) photos of the bike from PM (hopefully):






Ahhh, so the chain is on the small front, and probably 13T or 14T on the rear. It still looks like the chain may be a double-link too loose (which can be fixed, or remedied if the chain would need replaced).
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