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It is tough getting back in shape

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Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

It is tough getting back in shape

Old 10-12-21, 08:21 PM
  #26  
70sSanO
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You are doing great. My advice to improve distance, check out different routes/trails, drive there, and then ride your bike as far as you feel comfortable.

Variety and being able to explore new sights on a bike is great. And after a while the miles just seem to increase.

John
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Old 10-13-21, 08:05 PM
  #27  
Gonzo Bob
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Originally Posted by Bald Paul View Post
The other issue is that there always seems to be that rider that is stronger than the rest of the group, and wants to feel like a TdF pro by showing how fast he/she can be. I have led SORE rides, and always announce at the start that the group will ride no faster than the slowest rider is comfortable with, and if someone feels the need to go off the front, they had better know the route, because they are on their own.
Not sure what you mean by "SORE" rides. But I think I know what you mean by that rider. Hell, I think I may have been that rider for a brief period this year (my first year of club riding) until I realized that club riding is more about enjoying the journey together rather than trying of prove myself. Now I save my hard efforts for my solo rides, or for when a club ride needs someone to help pull the group through a stiff headwind.

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Old 10-13-21, 09:16 PM
  #28  
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Yes, it's better to do more miles on a day ride. That said, the gold standard is to increase total weekly mileage by 5%-10%. Note that this is like compound interest and 10% will get out of hand fairly quickly. It's better to ride as many days/week as is feasible So if your current weekly mileage goal is 20, you'd want to do 4 ea. 5 mile rides. I started riding again at 50 and it was hard for me, too. I tried to do 3-4 weekday rides and one weekend ride. On the weekend ride, I'd ride away from home until I was tired, then ride back, so however far, while still trying to not get ahead of myself by too much in terms of weekly increase.

Since you're going to be riding further away from home, be sure to carry 2 spare tubes, a patch kit, a pump, a multi-tool and whatever else seems like a good idea. If you haven't changed a flat yet, experiment at home. If you are new to it, there are YT videos. You'll also want a water bottle and someday 2 water bottles. Even in daylight, you want front and rear blinky lights, white in front, red in back. Being seen is your responsibility. In traffic, as cars go by you, always check that their right turn signal is not on.

I didn't go on a group ride for my first 2 years. It's hard enough just learning how to bike safely on one's own, much less with a bunch of unfamiliar riders.

Have a great winter down there.
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Old 10-14-21, 05:48 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by Gonzo Bob View Post
Not sure what you mean by "SORE" rides. But I think I know what you mean by that rider. Hell, I think I may have been that rider for a brief period this year (my first year of club riding) until I realized that club riding is more about enjoying the journey together rather than trying of prove myself. Now I save my hard efforts for my solo rides, or for when a club ride needs someone to help pull the group through a stiff headwind.
Read post #14 for the SORE definition.
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Old 10-17-21, 05:53 AM
  #30  
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Try keeping track of hours riding. Shoot for 5 to 6 a week. Donít worry about speed or distance. This is working for me better than speed or distance. Your in North Texas. Since itís cooling take the bike down to Fort Worth and ride the Trinity trail. I may h e the name wrong. My outlaws live down there and have not ridden there in years but will give you a change of scenery. Keep pedaling.
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Old 10-17-21, 07:48 AM
  #31  
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I think it is called the Trinity Trail. They have installed a lot of trails alongvyhe river. I have planned on going there once it got cooler.
I only mentioned my speed since it seemed important and map my ride figures it for me.
I really need a change of scenery. Riding streets through a neighborhood gets really boring.
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Old 10-17-21, 09:04 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by pepperbelly View Post
I think it is called the Trinity Trail. They have installed a lot of trails alongvyhe river. I have planned on going there once it got cooler.
I only mentioned my speed since it seemed important and map my ride figures it for me.
I really need a change of scenery. Riding streets through a neighborhood gets really boring.
Quite so. First thing, google "strava heat map." Zillions of riders upload their rides to a service called Strava. The Heat Map shows the sum of those rides and routes over the past year. The interesting thing is that these roads are where many riders feel safest, whether commuting or just riding, or they wouldn't be riding there. So that gives you some good ideas. RidewithGPS.com is another very popular ride planner. Most folks prefer it to MapMyRide, though that works just fine, too.
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Old 10-17-21, 09:17 AM
  #33  
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[QUOTE=pepperbelly;...itís boring.[/QUOTE]

One thing you can try is to vary your routes if possible. Make sure you stay safe, but riding new routes with new scenery, etc. really helps.

Another and more controversial boredom buster is audio support. Now I don't suggest wearing headphones or earbuds and listening to music...just spoken-word podcasts or audio books in the right ear at a moderate volume.

After a non-cycling injury kept me off my bike for a year I struggled to get back in shape and resume my 9-mile bike commute. I happened to notice one of the many discussions about listening to music while riding here on bikeforums, and some members mentioned how they listened to spoken word podcasts in one ear. They felt that setup allowed them to be aware of traffic and others around them, while helping distract themselves from boredom and discomfort. And I found that to be true for me as well.

I cannot recommend riding with both ears covered by headphones or stuffed with earbuds regardless of the content, music or otherwise.

But if music is the only thing that can get you through the pain and boredom of getting in shape, then just put your phone in a case on your handlebars or get a blue tooth speaker, but please keep the volume down, not just for your own safety, but because riding through a neighborhood with music blasting is rude.

As far as average speed. I bike commuted 9 miles each way for 28 years until last winter and my average (uphill/downhill) speed was only 13,5mph. I would ride 20-30 miles on the weekend and my average speed would be 13.5 mph. Rides above 30 mile (up to 58 miles) and my average speed would drop over time. When I do push myself hard my average speed (uphill/downhill average) might be 14.5 mph but that's it.

My goal has never been to be in racing shape...I've never raced. My goal was to get in reasonable shape and to have enough cardio fitness to enjoy life.

Now that I work from home, I find it harder to get out and ride, even though I have more freedom as to when and where I go. But when a new episode of one of my favorite podcasts arrives, I look forward to listening to it on the bike.

Continued success in reaching your personal goals. go, Go, GO!
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