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Old 09-15-22, 05:12 PM
  #26  
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I think what I have read is that despite looking like plain aluminum inside they are actually coated and alcohol attacks the coating. I could be wrong since info on this seems scarce. At a quick glance I didn't see any explaination on the MSR site, just the warning.

I also don't know how big of a deal it is to violate the warning or it other brands have a similar issue.
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Old 09-15-22, 06:42 PM
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I have been for the last 20yrs a hiker and mainly used a gas stove, I always use a wind shield, makes a real difference in speed and amount of fuel used. Check the temp of the canister every now and then , especially with a bigger pan. I
I am now a bikepacker and my last trip , 6 mths up the east coast of Australia I used a Caldera Cone. I loved it. It is only marginally slower than a gas stove, quieter, easy to find fuel. If you measure your fuel( a small measurer comes with the Caldera) there is no waste. With the cone I also made a small disc of aluminium as a base so there was even less likely hood of fire and it also helped to reflect heat up.
I would convert full time to this system if it wasnt for the fire issue( ban) in some NPs.

Roger
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Old 09-16-22, 08:09 AM
  #28  
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I have been out of town for a few weeks, did not see this before today. Lots of topics here.

Flying:

On flying with a stove, I have cleaned my stove and fuel bottle to an odor free status and did not have it confiscated, but from that effort decided never to fly with liquid fuel stove again. That said, if this is for your planned tour where you will be in sub freezing temps, liquid fuel stoves are best, especially if it can burn kerosene.

More on flying with stoves of all type at this link:
https://www.msrgear.com/blog/flying-...camping-stove/

Twice my stove has been inspected, once liquid fuel stove (the pot support they thought was a weapon due to saw blade shape on X ray), the other time they saw a stove on X ray (a butane mix type stove) and wanted to see if it smelled of fuel. That said, security levels in different countries, airports and even from one staffer to the next will be different to some degree so I would not take one experience from one person on a flight an apply that across the board.

Liquid fuel (non-alcohol):

I know that you said you do not want to use liquid fuel, but I suspect in the end you will use it.

I have found my stoves when used with a kerosene jet work better and prime better if I mix it with about 3 parts kerosene with 1 part white gas. Bring the tools you need to tune it up. I have had to clean some hardened soot out of some of the internal pathways on my Optimums Nova when using it with kerosene, there were some grooves in the valve needle that I had to remove some carbon with my knife.

Alcohol:

I have never used an alcohol stove, but I know that there are different alcohols, some have more BTUs of energy per gram or milliliter than others, I will let you figure that out yourself. As noted above, rubbing alcohol often has water added, which would mostly prevent that from working. An ethanol that can be drank is often heavily taxed and also often is mixed with water. The non-drinkable ethanol usually is mixed with something like gasoline or benzene to encourage people from trying to drink it to save an taxes, that kind of ethanol you could burn. I suspect that Cycocommute could elaborate more on alcohols and motor fuels like E-85 than I can. I changed jobs in 2001 and have forgotten much of what I knew about this sort of thing.

Temperatures:

For canister stoves, keep in mind you are talking about a trip where sometimes you will be in sub-freezing temps. Often even if it is above freezing, I will put my canister in a shallow warm (NOT hot) water to keep the fuel warmer. I carry a plastic jar lid that is slighly larger than the diameter of the 227 gram size canisters that I can use for warm water on cold days on my camping trips.
More at:
https://www.msrgear.com/blog/faq-how...-temperatures/

As the fuel is converted to vapor phase on the liquid fuel surface in the canister, the fuel that remains in the canister will cool rapidly. Some stoves mount the canister on a remote stand upside down. In that orientation, the fuel in the canister should not get cooler from the evaporation because the evaporation occurs elsewhere.

Primus Omnifuel stove can use white gas, kerosene, and also and be threaded onto the threaded type canisters. That is a stove you may consider, but as noted above it could be more difficult to fly with. It uses three jets, one for white gas, one kerosene and one for a butane mix fuel from a threaded type canister.

Canister types:

I assume you are only talking about butane or mixtures of butane, not propane. Propane is at very high pressure, much more steel in the tank construction, it is heavy.

I think it unlikely that you would run across the puncture type canisters and if you did they would probably not be the only ones available. Half a century ago, those were the prevalent type of stove canister. They are sold in some parts of the world, but almost impossible to find in N America.

Below there are two types of canisters in the photo, the non-threaded one on the left, threaded on right. I saw a lot of unthreaded canisters on free shelves on one of my tours, nobody had stoves that could use them so they accumulated.



I assume you are only talking about the threaded canisters. I have a stove that will work with both canisters, an MSR Superfly, but I would expect non-threaded would be so rare where you are planning, I do not think you need to be prepared for it. But if you learn otherwise later, the MSR Superfly would be a good stove to take. My Superfly in the photo below on an unthreaded canister.



As TCS noted above (I repeated his photos below) he showed two types of canisters. The nozzle type (or tall and skinny) on the left and the threaded type on the right.




The stoves that use the nozzle type canisters are heavy and big, you do not want one.

You can buy the tools to transfer fuel from the the nozzle type canister to the threaded type canister. Thus if you had an empty threaded canister and could only buy the nozzle type canister, you could transfer the fuel to the threaded type canister. I do not want to help someone blow themselves up accidently, so I will not elaborate further here, but if you researched it you would find more info on that.

An FYI, for the past few weeks I was on a backpacking trip, I was curious how the adapters to convert the nozzle type canister to a stove that would be used on one of the threaded canisters. So, I brought a few adapters to try them. They worked great. I will add photos later to this post. Or, I might start a new thread, will decide later. I have a lot of unpacking to do, got home from my backpacking trip last night and unpacking takes priority over digging out my camera for photos.
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Old 09-16-22, 12:03 PM
  #29  
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My wife and I returned from a 10-day backpack in the Cascades on 9/10. A big fire started the day before near our exit route. We were very lucky that the winds stayed favorable to our exit and we didn't die. It's believed that this fire started from a campfire. Never build a fire in the backcountry, or use a stove without a valve, not anymore. Our Optimus worked perfectly as always.

We did some of our hike on the PCT and camped with groups of thru-hikers, it being early September, which is when the bulk of them come through here. Every thru-hiker we saw in camp used a Jetboil cannister stove, all identical. I think they were the Stash model - definitely gray. They'd sit cross-legged in a circle, their Jetboils in front of them. They'd pour some dehydrated substance into them and spoon it up while they conversed. All the same. There's a group model too, but even those who were traveling together, each used their own stove.

If I were re-gearing for in-country adventures, I'd get one of the Jetboil models. Going overseas, it's always the fuel availability issue. IME liquid gas stoves have the most reliable fuel source. Or simpler, pastry for breakfast and eat in cafťs.
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Old 09-16-22, 01:56 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
The stoves that use the nozzle type canisters are heavy and big, you do not want one.
The 'hotplate' style stoves common in NA for car camping, agreed. There are some nifty little Japanese stoves that aren't bigger than common NA camping canister stoves.



Shout out to those two Japanese cycletourists in Colorado who opened my eyes to possibilities in life back in 1968: domo arigato, guys!
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Old 09-16-22, 02:03 PM
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Over on the Classic Campstoves forum there are some cats who custom drilled jets and converted their MSR Whisperlite Internationals/Universals to operate on alcohol. Now you know as much about that as I do!

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Old 09-16-22, 02:18 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
I assume you are only talking about butane or mixtures of butane, not propane. Propane is at very high pressure, much more steel in the tank construction, it is heavy.
The adapter to operate a butane camp stove on a propane cylinder, either a 16 oz camping one or a 14 oz hand torch one, is small and inexpensive. This is useful for car camping and disaster preparedness. Man, oh man, I'd have to be desperate to cycletour powering my butane stove with one of those heavy propane cylinders, though.

If you like to walk on the wild side, you can operate a propane camp stove or lantern on threaded butane. But, and it's a big but, the adapter doesn't contain a valve, relying on the Lindal valve on the canister and the shut-off valve on the appliance. Unscrew the appliance first and your butane canister is going to vent its gas to the atmosphere faster than Apollo 13.


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Old 09-16-22, 02:32 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
If I were re-gearing for in-country adventures, I'd get one of the Jetboil models.
Back to what one wants to cook. Many of the Jetboil/MSR Windburner style stoves - great for heating water to reconstitute dehydrated backpacking meals - can be challenging for cycletourists to cook small-town Dollar General foodstuffs with. Jetboil addressed this with their Minimo model.
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Old 09-16-22, 02:38 PM
  #34  
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A similar 'stove stories' thread over on the CTC CyclingUK Forums saw a preponderance of support for the Trangia 25/27 cooksets, many used with the optional gas burner or multifuel burner in addition to or in place of the classic alcohol burner.
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Old 09-16-22, 02:44 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by Norts View Post
I have been for the last 20yrs a hiker and mainly used a gas stove, I always use a wind shield, makes a real difference in speed and amount of fuel used.

Roger
Way back when I backpacked, I used a Svea gas stove. Hoping to improve its efficiency, I purchased an MSR wind screen, designed for the stoves whose fuel tank would be located outside of the burner and wind screen. Not giving it much thought, I used the wind screen on my Svea, which of course caused the integrated fuel tank to overheat and release pressure thru the pressure cap. The escaping fuel promptly caught fire and being somewhere on the AT in Maine, it was like a Saturn 5 rocket at launch. I found 2 sticks to carry the flaming stove 100 ft, to a stream to cool off. The stove was never the same after, even with a re-build.
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Old 09-16-22, 03:11 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by tcs View Post
The adapter to operate a butane camp stove on a propane cylinder, either a 16 oz camping one or a 14 oz hand torch one, is small and inexpensive. This is useful for car camping and disaster preparedness. Man, oh man, I have to be desperate to cycletour powering my butane stove with one of those heavy propane cylinders, though.

If you like to walk on the wild side, you can operate a propane camp stove or lantern on threaded butane. But, and it's a big but, the adapter doesn't contain a valve, relying on the Lindal valve on the canister and the shut-off valve on the appliance. Unscrew the appliance first and your butane canister is going to vent its gas to the atmosphere faster than Apollo 13.

Yeah, wow. I've seen a guy do that..
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Old 09-16-22, 04:23 PM
  #37  
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Yeah wind screens can be a problem with a variety of stoves if misused. I have used craft foil screens with pop can stoves, canister stoves, and liquid fuel stoves without incident. The key is to take care with how tightly you close it in. Keep the wind off, but don't confine it to a tiny space and all will be well. When in doubt leave more opening than you think you need.
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Old 09-16-22, 04:25 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
...
We did some of our hike on the PCT and camped with groups of thru-hikers, it being early September, which is when the bulk of them come through here. Every thru-hiker we saw in camp used a Jetboil cannister stove, all identical. I think they were the Stash model - definitely gray. They'd sit cross-legged in a circle, their Jetboils in front of them. They'd pour some dehydrated substance into them and spoon it up while they conversed. All the same. There's a group model too, but even those who were traveling together, each used their own stove.

If I were re-gearing for in-country adventures, I'd get one of the Jetboil models. Going overseas, it's always the fuel availability issue. IME liquid gas stoves have the most reliable fuel source. Or simpler, pastry for breakfast and eat in cafťs.
I just got home from backpacking on the Superior Hiking Trail, not as long or well known as the PCT, but it had its share of thru hikers. (I was not one of them, I only did two weeks. Probably will pick up where I left off next year.) Not all used Jetboil, but several did. But backpacking, you are carrying every ounce on your feet, not on your tires, so weight is much more critical when backpacking. My menu for hot food and drink was 100 percent boil and add the boiled water to something. The dehydrated suppers, sometimes I would add a bit of heat after some of the rehydrating occurred but usually just boil and quit. I think that every day was 7 cups of boiled water for my menu. Yes, I carried a measuring cup, call it a luxury if you wish.

But bike touring, I am inclined to do more cooking, which can take more time, more fuel, and heavier food. So, I am sticking with mis-matched stoves and pots. Bike touring, I even bring a small fry pan, plus of course a cork screw.

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Old 09-16-22, 04:28 PM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by tcs View Post
Over on the Classic Campstoves forum there are some cats who custom drilled jets and converted their MSR Whisperlite Internationals to operate on alcohol. Now you know as much about that as I do!
My Optimus 111T is supposed to be able to operate on alcohol, besides white gas and kerosene. But I do not have the jet for it. The alcohol conversion also needs a tube to restrict airflow to make the mixture richer.

Historically several Primus and Optimus stoves could operate on alcohol.
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Old 09-16-22, 05:04 PM
  #40  
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In some previous threads over the past few years I mentioned that I have seen some larger RV parks had a small store and sold the tall skinny canisters (I refer to them as the nozzle type canisters, and the shorter squat ones most of us use (I refer to them as threaded canisters) were not sold at all at those RV parks. Thus, I had been thinking about getting an adapter to carry on bike tours if there was a good chance that I would often camp in RV parks.

And yesterday on my way home from my backpacking trip, I stopped at a farm store to buy a few things. Historically that store sold the threaded canisters, then also sold the nozzle type canisters too. Yesterday, they did not sell the threaded canisters at all although they did have a couple stoves on the shelf for the threaded canisters. Now they were only selling the nozzle canisters. I think it is pretty clear that we will see the nozzle type canisters more often over years to come.

In my post number 28 above I said:

Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
....
An FYI, for the past few weeks I was on a backpacking trip, I was curious how the adapters to convert the nozzle type canister to a stove that would be used on one of the threaded canisters. So, I brought a few adapters to try them. They worked great. I will add photos later to this post. Or, I might start a new thread, will decide later. I have a lot of unpacking to do, got home from my backpacking trip last night and unpacking takes priority over digging out my camera for photos.
I plan to start a new thread later, but here are a few photos of what I was trying out and a few remarks. In all cases, I used my Snow Peak stove that I have owned for (I am guessing) a decade and a half. In some of the photos, there is a sock over the canister, it was often in the 40s (F) in the morning and I was trying to keep the canister from getting cold too fast.

This adapter is partly plastic, cost about $10 on Ebay, shipped from Asia. It works and is lightweight.



The adapter beolw is a remote on that puts the canister farther from the burner. The main advantage of this is that it puts the stove MUCH lower. I have somewhere in storage a remote stove stand that used to be sold by Brunton, mine developed a leak so I was happy to find this remote stand that can work with both nozzle type canisters and threaded canisters. Unfortunately, this one fell off of the available list at Amazon, when I bought it the cost was a bit under $25. They have ones like it that only work on nozzle canisters, but I got a remote stand that works with both nozzle and threaded canisters.



In all cases with these nozzle type canisters, the ring on the top of the canister has a square notch cut in it, that notch has to be at the top so that vapor, not liquid comes out of the canister. It is a bit hard to see in the above photo, but there is a notch in that ring at the top. Sometimes the cans are also labled that way, but not always.

The downside of the remote adapter is that it is possible to turn the canister in the adapter so that the part of the canister that is supposed to stay at the top is not at the top, the other two adapters were designed better in this regard.

My Snow Peak stove has an optional wind guard that I sometimes use, it goes just below the burner head. In the next two photos below you can see the advantage of a low mounting remote stand on windy days.



With the stove windscreen below the burner and the separate one around the stove, this is a nice combination in winds.
.


The above were going to be my two investments into adapters.

But then I saw a third one. I am a retired engineer and I have an appreciation for what appears to be a well designed and manufactured piece of equipement that just screams quality when you look at it. So, I had to pay another $25 for a third adapter, below.



I plan to elaborate further on these later in a new thread. I leave for a canoe trip in two weeks, I will try to get it posted before then.

Note to TCS, I do recall that you previously posted that "nifty little Japanese" stove in a previous thread, and it is a very nice looking stove. But I think most of us would prefer to carry an adapter instead of two stoves if possible, and that stove really does look expensive.

ADDENDUM:

Added a better photo:


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Old 09-16-22, 09:29 PM
  #41  
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Tourist in MSN You mean an adapter to use a butane cartridge (larger, but similar to what is often used to refill lighters) with a remote canister stove, right? Have you tried adapters (such as this one) that can be used to refill a screw-on canister (used with an upright stove)?

I'll try to gather my thoughts and post something this week end.
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Old 09-17-22, 05:26 AM
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Originally Posted by gauvins View Post
Tourist in MSN You mean an adapter to use a butane cartridge (larger, but similar to what is often used to refill lighters) with a remote canister stove, right? Have you tried adapters (such as this one) that can be used to refill a screw-on canister (used with an upright stove)?

I'll try to gather my thoughts and post something this week end.
I had bought one of those and immediately the O ring fell off and was lost. I will send you a private message.
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Old 09-17-22, 07:59 AM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
A big fire started the day before near our exit route. We were very lucky that the winds stayed favorable to our exit and we didn't die. It's believed that this fire started from a campfire. Never build a fire in the backcountry, or use a stove without a valve, not anymore.

I was a little surprised in this day and age of "leave no trace"

https://bikepacking.com/plog/seven-p...r-bikepackers/

that Adventure Cycling was actually promoting campfires

https://www.adventurecycling.org/blo...ook-with-fire/

Yeah, it's a little different in an established campsite with a cleared area around a fire ring, but there is still sensitivity to denuding the area, sparks and embers, and smoking out your neighbor campers.


"I never make a campfire. I don't want to smell like smoked fish all day." - Heinz StŁcke
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Old 09-17-22, 09:10 AM
  #44  
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Sort of off-topic but only a little: Does anyone know why Coleman discontinued their simple white gas stove? The one with the integral tank and the pump? They still make a multi-fuel version of that stove, but I believe it's somewhat heavier. I had one for many years but it eventually wore out and I haven't been able to replace it. It was my absolute favorite for canoe and car camping; a little heavy for bike use.

What I loved about it was the instant-on feature without having to pre-heat it with an open flame. Seemed like they were in every Wal- and K-mart for decades, for $40 or so, and all of a sudden, they disappeared. Is anyone aware of another white gas stove with similar features?

cheers -mathias
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Old 09-18-22, 01:45 AM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
Thats really curious about alcohol in msr bottles, they are aluminum, so that surprises me. I will look into it though.

and yes, there are real dangers using soft drink bottles or anything 'drink" looking, I was the only one using it, but still was concerned and did mark it like crazy.
the reason that the MSR fuel bottle isnít rated for alcohol is because isopropyl alcohol dissolves the o-ring seal on the lid which will cause a leak. Also Iím not sure what plastic is used for the MSR lid, but most plastics either resist petroleum based fuels or alcohol, but rarely both. Since the MSR bottle was designed for kerosene, white gas, diesel fuel, and gasoline, Iím pretty sure the capís plastic is not able to withstand the properties of alcohol.
When Ethanol was starting to show up in the gas stations, there were lots of problems with fuel line deterioration and carburetor problems due to the alcohol drying out the rubber. The fix was to switch to Nitrophyl plastic floats, and all the rubber was replaced with Nitrile Rubber.
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Old 09-18-22, 03:51 AM
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Originally Posted by M Rose View Post
the reason that the MSR fuel bottle isnít rated for alcohol is because isopropyl alcohol dissolves the o-ring seal on the lid which will cause a leak. Also Iím not sure what plastic is used for the MSR lid, but most plastics either resist petroleum based fuels or alcohol, but rarely both. Since the MSR bottle was designed for kerosene, white gas, diesel fuel, and gasoline, Iím pretty sure the capís plastic is not able to withstand the properties of alcohol.
When Ethanol was starting to show up in the gas stations, there were lots of problems with fuel line deterioration and carburetor problems due to the alcohol drying out the rubber. The fix was to switch to Nitrophyl plastic floats, and all the rubber was replaced with Nitrile Rubber.
Interesting, thanks.
I use a different screw on top I bought that has a small spout feature, for no spill pouring. You twist open the spout part for fuel to come out, twist other way to close.
Bought it years ago, have no recollection of what it said on package, but one it would be better for trangia use, less wastage of alcohol running down the side of the msr bottle etc.

Interesting about carb floats and different rubber lines.
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Old 09-18-22, 04:42 AM
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Originally Posted by M Rose View Post
...
When Ethanol was starting to show up in the gas stations, there were lots of problems with fuel line deterioration and carburetor problems due to the alcohol drying out the rubber. The fix was to switch to Nitrophyl plastic floats, and all the rubber was replaced with Nitrile Rubber.
I will never forget that. In mid 1980s in Minnesota, they changed the tax structure to promote more ethanol use in what was called Gasahol at that time. (Minnesota being a big corn producing state.) Suddenly you could not buy gasoline without 10 percent ethanol. I had a Ford Courier (made by Mazda) at the time. Within a couple weeks my gas tank was leaking, engine running like crap and when I got it into a garage that rebuilt carburetors, the repair bill was almost as much as the value of the truck. They said I was down to only one cylinder. One of the jets in the carb had dissolved and disappeared, thus it was running so rich they had to change the oil because so much gas got into the oil from the non-firing cylinders. By then you saw big signs at gas stations that proudly stated that they only sold REAL gasoline after their bad experience with irate customers.
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Old 09-18-22, 05:31 AM
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Originally Posted by M Rose View Post
the reason that the MSR fuel bottle isn’t rated for alcohol is because isopropyl alcohol dissolves the o-ring seal on the lid which will cause a leak.
Do you have any reference from MSR or other solid source to verify that is the reason? It makes sense, but I have seen a lot of unofficial mentions of a problem with a coating in the bottles. Also I believe they say it is okay for gasoline and most of the gasoline available has ethanol in it often as much as 10%. Ethanol in gasoline didn't go away. https://www.usnews.com/news/us/artic...dwest%20states.

If the problem were the o-ring that would be good news for folks who wanted to use them for alcohol since it would be simple to replace the o-ring with one that was compatible. The thing is that the o-ring is likely neoprene or nitrile already and either are pretty resistant to alcohol.

It could also be the cap itself that is the problem, but I have never read any mention of that being the problem on the MSR bottles. I find it weird that MSR has so little info that shows up in a quick search. Also I wonder how dire the consequences are since I have read of folks unknowingly using the bottles for alcohol and have heard of none complaining of serious problems. Maybe MSR just want to be super cautious and only advertise their product for the limited specific use it was designed for.
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Old 09-18-22, 07:17 AM
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I purchased a set of adapters for canister fuel on eBay. One allows a Lindal valve device ( most canister stove designs) to accept either a disposable 1 lbs propane cylinder or the screw on “aerosol” looking butane cans that are used with Single burner, indoor burners. This gives three options for fuel, at least here in North America. There are also various “refill” adapters that can transfer gas from one system into another. Maybe these can be modified for use as a “remote” canister option where a shutoff valve is required, as they all seem to have a shutoff valve.
The famous Coleman white gas stoves seem to work quite well when adapted to run on Propane. This makes me curious about all the options for a multi fuel stove. Can a Multi fuel stove like MSR be made adaptable for the prevalent fuel source in each region? There are YouTube videos showing people adapting their Coleman stoves to be useable with Kerosene/ Paraffin fuel. Essentially, they add alcohol cup “Pre- heaters” to the burners and some technique to preheat the gas generator tube ( usually gel hand cleaner or sterno). As with these bulkier stoves, can the high tech multi fuel backpacking stoves be similarly adapted? Having such options would make the investment in these multi fuel stoves an incentive.
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Old 09-18-22, 08:08 AM
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After some thought I still wondered about what the consequences of using the MSR bottles with alcohol woule be. I figure that most alcohol stoves are really simple devices and not likely to suffer any damage from a tiny bit of contamination of the fuel if the alcohol attacked any plastic in the coating, lid, or o-ring of an MSR bottle. You might breathe some of the product of that, but how much is really going to be dissolved and the stoves are used in open air so I personally wouldn't sweat it. Others likely are more cautious about such things, but I'd be content with just keeping and eye on the cap and o-ring for major signs of disolving or other breakdown. If I observed major breakdown over the long term I'd mend my careless ways. If the coating thing is real that might be harder to monitor since it seems to not really be visible.

The possibility of damaging a very expensive bottle is another matter, but folks have used them long-ish term and not noticed damage. Also caps and o-rings would be easily replaceable if degraded. So not a major issue.

All that assumes that I'd want to use an MSR bottle for alcohol. The question for me is why use an expensive bottle for alcohol when a cheaper and lighter one suffices. You don't need to pressurize the bottle to burn alcohol with the stoves folks typically burn alcohol in (pop can stoves or a trangia). Also the prospect of spillage on your gear isn't really that bad with alcohol compared with something like gasoling or kerosene. It isn't really much worse than spilling a little water if it is worse at all. It evaporates quickly and doesn't smell after evaporating.

I tend to think this is a real thing to the extent that MSR does recommend against using the bottles for alcohol, but suspect it isn't a big deal. On the other hand, I'd just as soon use a plastic beverage bottle (well marked and kept away from other people) or better yet a yellow heet bottle or the bottle the product came in.
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