Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Shimano Altus A10 Upgrade Help - Cannondale H400

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Shimano Altus A10 Upgrade Help - Cannondale H400

Old 07-17-21, 06:57 PM
  #1  
Bruce n Atlanta
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Shimano Altus A10 Upgrade Help - Cannondale H400

Hello,

My first post here...... I have a Cannondale H400 I purchased in 1993... yes really. And finally, I want to change out the drive hardware as it is really worn out.. shifting is a noisy mess... teeth look my uncle Bob's scary mouth. I never changed the chain or anything. Instead of just replacing each piece, I was hoping to upgrade the hardware... I never thought it was great to begin with. So..... I would like to upgrade the chain, rear and front derailleurs, rear cogset, and front chain rings. Regarding "upgrade".. I mean smoother more precision. If this is problematic, then does Shimano have a direct replacment? Again, I am confused.

What is on there now:
  • Rear/front derailleurs: Shimano Altus A10
  • Crankset: Shimano Altus A10, 30/40/50 teeth
  • Rear cogset: Shimano Hyperglide 7-speed, 13 - 30 teeth
  • Chain: Shimano Hyperglide
  • Shifters... seem ok to me so no need to replace.
Please help.... I have no idea where to begin and ensure whatever I pick will work. I stopped into a big-name store with a large bike maintenance section and the tech was really clueless on how to research this. He was helpful... but. So, I really did not know where to turn for help. I love the frame... the bike just fits me... I am 61 years old and use the bike for exercise and really do use all the gears, front and rear. Cannondale really did a good job laying out the ratios on this bike... so I would like to keep them if possible.

Note, if you go to BikePedia, make sure you select 1993... the bike was different over the years.

Bonus opinion: My friend is trying to get me to just buy a new ride.... I dunno, I really like this bike and it is perfect for me... just worn out parts.

Peace
Bruce in Atlanta

Last edited by Bruce n Atlanta; 07-17-21 at 07:11 PM.
Bruce n Atlanta is offline  
Old 07-17-21, 07:17 PM
  #2  
curbtender
Senior Member
 
curbtender's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SF Bay Area, East bay
Posts: 7,755

Bikes: Marinoni, Kestral 200 2002 Trek 5200, KHS Flite, Koga Miyata, Schwinn Spitfire 5, Schwinn Speedster, Mondia Special, Univega Alpina, Miyata team Ti, MB3

Mentioned: 45 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1266 Post(s)
Liked 1,426 Times in 756 Posts
You need to at least look at the new bikes. 7 speed now would only get you low end components. If you go forward, I'd search for a craigslist bike that was low use for a parts bike. Here is one with new tires even...
https://atlanta.craigslist.org/sat/b...349578735.html

Last edited by curbtender; 07-18-21 at 07:26 AM.
curbtender is offline  
Old 07-17-21, 07:42 PM
  #3  
SalsaShark
Senior Member
 
SalsaShark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eastern Iowa
Posts: 631

Bikes: 2014 Trek Allant drop bar conversion, modified Schwinn MTN commuter, 2015 Trek 520, Soma ES, Salsa Journeyman, 1980 Trek 414

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 178 Post(s)
Liked 355 Times in 166 Posts
You can get a new 7/8 speed square taper crankset with 28/38/48 in either Shimano's Altus or Acera group. Price is +/- $35-50 respectively.
If appears your rear cluster is a 7-speed freewheel, and it looks like Sunrace currently makes a 13-28t model. Shimano has a 14-28 and 14-34. I would favor the Sunrace unit coupled with the 28/38/48 crankset if you liked the current gearing on your bike.
A new Shimano Altus RD-M310 rear derailleur will set you back about $25 or so.
If the front derailleur is not damaged and is working well, I would keep it in place, as there is nothing to really wear out and adversely affect performance like the rear derailleur. I did a quick search for 7-speed 3x FD and there is only a couple low end offerings for 7 speed, and it appears these might not accommodate a wide range 20t capacity.
As for a chain, I like the KMC 7/8 speed models - good quality and inexpensive.
I would also recommend new cables and housing for both front and rear (and also brake cables since you are already doing the gear cables). Lube up the shifters and pivots on the old FD, and everything should function like new for less than $150 or so.
Should be a pretty straight forward project - good luck!
SalsaShark is offline  
Likes For SalsaShark:
Old 07-17-21, 08:52 PM
  #4  
Bill Kapaun
Really Old Senior Member
 
Bill Kapaun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Mid Willamette Valley, Orygun
Posts: 13,255

Bikes: 87 RockHopper,2008 Specialized Globe. Both upgraded to 9 speeds.

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1546 Post(s)
Liked 848 Times in 610 Posts
What's the rear drop out spacing.
IF 130mm or more, maybe you want to move up to 9 speed?

Bill Kapaun is offline  
Old 07-17-21, 09:20 PM
  #5  
thook
(rhymes with spook)
 
thook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Winslow, AR
Posts: 2,795

Bikes: '83 univega gran turismo x2, '85 schwinn super le tour,'89 miyata triple cross, '91 GT tequesta, '90 yokota grizzly peak, '94 GT backwoods, '95'ish scott tampico, '98 bonty privateer, '93 mongoose crossway 625, '98 parkpre ariel, 2k'ish giant fcr3

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 919 Post(s)
Liked 740 Times in 546 Posts
if the rear cluster is a cassette and not a freewheel, an option is to go 3 x 7 on 8 speed spacing. or 3 x 8 on 9 speed spacing. in either case, you can use your existing wheelset. you simply remove one of the gears from the gear cluster to make it fit on the hub. (7 cogs from 8sdp cassette, and 8 cogs from a 9spd cassette). you would also need new shifters, though. i know...you said yours are working fine, but the question is for how much longer given their age?

mind you, i'm not one towards "upgraditus" wherein more/newer is always better. thing is it's getting harder to retrofit as availability and practicality is dropping off as technology continues to advance.
for example, i went to modernbike to see what would be available to you within your given preferences. darn near everything is currently unavailable. so, unless you're somewhat or fully focused on getting a reproduction of your existing set up, it might be wise to flex a little within what's currently available.

to be more specific, trying to match the 30/40/50 with the same gearing in the rear is going to be a challenge. you can still get the same gear ratios and approximate feel of shifting with a 28/38/48 (as suggested already) and a 12-28 cassette either in an 8 or 9spd cassette. you'd simply get a cassette (ie. 8spd) and drop the 32t cog off the cluster with 12-28 remaining.
https://www.modernbike.com/sunrace-c...speed-cassette
make sense?
here are some 8 speed shifter options
https://www.amazon.com/shimano-8-spe...+speed+shifter
8spd chains are also inexpensive. keep your current front derailleur and get an 8spd rear derailleur in alivio, acera, or even deore (if you want to spring for a little extra). any of those components are quality enough for practical purposes. and, of course, get a crankset as suggested above
hope this helps!

Last edited by thook; 07-17-21 at 09:26 PM.
thook is offline  
Old 07-17-21, 11:46 PM
  #6  
jimc101
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: West Yorkshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 5,730
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 430 Post(s)
Liked 77 Times in 67 Posts
For a Cannondale of that age, suspect that the frame/components will be better than anything of a similar price today so worth saving.

For replacing the drivetrain, pre C-19 this was super easy, now there maybe issues in parts availability your area dependent.

One think that will probably limit you is the rear wheel, suspect the frame (being a hybrid) has an OLD of 135mm (see Bills post above) and the groupset you currently have Shimano Atlus A10 was an MTB group and they were 135mm back then, but a 1993 rear hub will probably be physically limited to 7 speed cassettes, as 8 speed really didn't exist till 1994, (what thook has posted above is correct if your hub is 8 speed compatible, but a lot/most 1993 and earlier aren't forward /8 speed compatible, and the idea of removing a single sprocket/gear is nice, till you realize that normally involves drilling/grinding out rivets, a massive expense when you could just buy the correct part in the first place),

For the parts you need from your post, would either look at current Shimano Acera/Alivio range (you would need to check the ratios of the crank/cassette, as they look to be standard drive, not the current compact drive) of if you have time, trawl eBay, Facebook marketplace, craigslist/similar for NOS/period correct parts, they are out there, often just need some time to find.

Would stayaway from any 'big box store' and find a good LBS/co-op who can help you with this if you need assistance in sourcing/fitting parts

Last edited by jimc101; 07-17-21 at 11:52 PM.
jimc101 is offline  
Likes For jimc101:
Old 07-18-21, 01:04 PM
  #7  
thook
(rhymes with spook)
 
thook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Winslow, AR
Posts: 2,795

Bikes: '83 univega gran turismo x2, '85 schwinn super le tour,'89 miyata triple cross, '91 GT tequesta, '90 yokota grizzly peak, '94 GT backwoods, '95'ish scott tampico, '98 bonty privateer, '93 mongoose crossway 625, '98 parkpre ariel, 2k'ish giant fcr3

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 919 Post(s)
Liked 740 Times in 546 Posts
Originally Posted by jimc101 View Post

One think that will probably limit you is the rear wheel, suspect the frame (being a hybrid) has an OLD of 135mm (see Bills post above) and the groupset you currently have Shimano Atlus A10 was an MTB group and they were 135mm back then, but a 1993 rear hub will probably be physically limited to 7 speed cassettes, as 8 speed really didn't exist till 1994, (what thook has posted above is correct if your hub is 8 speed compatible, but a lot/most 1993 and earlier aren't forward /8 speed compatible, and the idea of removing a single sprocket/gear is nice, till you realize that normally involves drilling/grinding out rivets, a massive expense when you could just buy the correct part in the first place),
i respectfully disagree...only in the interest of OP's situation and options. otherwise, it doesn't matter to me.
some cassettes have screws and other rivets. takes less than 10 min's to drill out rivet heads. then they just pop out. and, approx $20 for a cassette (8spd) only to drop one cog isn't a massive expense if you consider it's still a far cheaper option than buying a new wheelset in order to update a drivetrain
thook is offline  
Old 07-18-21, 01:09 PM
  #8  
thook
(rhymes with spook)
 
thook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Winslow, AR
Posts: 2,795

Bikes: '83 univega gran turismo x2, '85 schwinn super le tour,'89 miyata triple cross, '91 GT tequesta, '90 yokota grizzly peak, '94 GT backwoods, '95'ish scott tampico, '98 bonty privateer, '93 mongoose crossway 625, '98 parkpre ariel, 2k'ish giant fcr3

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 919 Post(s)
Liked 740 Times in 546 Posts
Originally Posted by jimc101 View Post

For the parts you need from your post, would either look at current Shimano Acera/Alivio range (you would need to check the ratios of the crank/cassette, as they look to be standard drive, not the current compact drive) of if you have time, trawl eBay, Facebook marketplace, craigslist/similar for NOS/period correct parts, they are out there, often just need some time to find.
also, respectfully , i don't know when's the last time you've looked at ebay or anywhere to find period correct/NOS parts, but it's getting pretty expensive. discouragingly so
thook is offline  
Old 07-19-21, 10:16 AM
  #9  
Bruce n Atlanta
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanx all for the posts... you are giving me more courage to tackle this... I gotta do a bit more research, measuring etc.

Thanx so much

Peace
Bruce in Atlanta
Bruce n Atlanta is offline  
Old 07-19-21, 10:47 AM
  #10  
jimc101
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: West Yorkshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 5,730
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 430 Post(s)
Liked 77 Times in 67 Posts
Originally Posted by thook View Post
also, respectfully , i don't know when's the last time you've looked at ebay or anywhere to find period correct/NOS parts, but it's getting pretty expensive. discouragingly so
If you have the tools, then not an issue, if you don't then it's a unnecessary expense to buy all that's needed to drill out the rivets etc. I've been fixing bike for the past 25 years, with hand tools, but don't have, or have the space for the tools needed for drilling steel like that, much as it would be nice.

For NOS/good used parts it's very market dependent, I'm in the UK, which is obviously different to the US, but we still had shortages and increased prices over the last 18 months, however recently (and would look at eBay as not being the best place to look, as for the UK at least Facebook Market place seems to be taking alot of that market now) availability of very good condition parts has increased and people are clearing out the 'projects' they got for lockdown, some finished, some not, and with prices similar/no more than pre-lockdown, if you look there is good stuff available cheaply, you just have to be patient, and see it/be first when listed.
jimc101 is offline  
Old 07-19-21, 11:58 AM
  #11  
thook
(rhymes with spook)
 
thook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Winslow, AR
Posts: 2,795

Bikes: '83 univega gran turismo x2, '85 schwinn super le tour,'89 miyata triple cross, '91 GT tequesta, '90 yokota grizzly peak, '94 GT backwoods, '95'ish scott tampico, '98 bonty privateer, '93 mongoose crossway 625, '98 parkpre ariel, 2k'ish giant fcr3

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 919 Post(s)
Liked 740 Times in 546 Posts
Originally Posted by jimc101 View Post
If you have the tools, then not an issue, if you don't then it's a unnecessary expense to buy all that's needed to drill out the rivets etc. I've been fixing bike for the past 25 years, with hand tools, but don't have, or have the space for the tools needed for drilling steel like that, much as it would be nice.

For NOS/good used parts it's very market dependent, I'm in the UK, which is obviously different to the US, but we still had shortages and increased prices over the last 18 months, however recently (and would look at eBay as not being the best place to look, as for the UK at least Facebook Market place seems to be taking alot of that market now) availability of very good condition parts has increased and people are clearing out the 'projects' they got for lockdown, some finished, some not, and with prices similar/no more than pre-lockdown, if you look there is good stuff available cheaply, you just have to be patient, and see it/be first when listed.
a cordless hand drill and cheap set of standard drill bits?
thook is offline  
Old 07-19-21, 02:07 PM
  #12  
Keefusb
Keefusb
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Location: Ashland, VA
Posts: 92

Bikes: 60cm 1992 Paramount, 60cm 1995 Cannondale R900 (son's bike), 1994 Cannondale H300 (mine), 1994 Cannondale H300 Killer V (wife's bike), 60 cm 1989 Eddy Merckx Corsa Extra SLX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 13 Posts
I have a couple of Cannondale H300 hybrids from the same era, you won't find anything comparable nowadays in terms of cool-looking, relatively lightweight aluminium hybrid frames.
Several years ago I upgraded the deraileurs to Shimano XT, and a NOS Suntour triple crankset. You probably don't need to go up to 8 or 9 speed on a hybrid if you have a triple crankset. You can browse eBay for components. I would also replace the bottom bracket, as the ones that came on those bikes had a plastic lock ring that almost always broke. Those bikes also came with cheap headset bearings that tended to wear out without regular servicing (cleaning and re-greasing). As someone else stated you can probably overhaul this bike for $150-$200 and have a neat old bike that rides and performs better than it did when new.

Last edited by Keefusb; 07-20-21 at 04:28 AM.
Keefusb is offline  
Likes For Keefusb:
Old 07-19-21, 08:15 PM
  #13  
ShannonM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: Humboldt County, CA
Posts: 695
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 320 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 313 Times in 216 Posts
I had a '93 H300 that I stripped and rebuilt. Your H400 used the same frame and fork as that year's T1000 touring bike. So you've got one of the best loaded touring framesets ever made...very few have ever been as good, and none were better. So, yeah, it's totally worth upgrading.

With your bikes's 135 mm rear spacing, 700C wheels, standard threading everywhere, and no weird proprietary parts, you can put danged near whatever parts you want on the bike. The only thing you can't put on the bike are disk brakes, but good cantilevers, good pads, and quality levers are phenomenal brakes, so no sweat. The 1" threaded headset would make a fork upgrade somewhat challenging, but I can't think of a carbon fork that would be a good match anyway. Everything else will just fit and work.

Better wheels and a new crankset and bottom bracket alone would probably take 3-5 pounds off the bike, even using midrange parts. If you want to put drop bars on it, you've got to pick the right derailleurs and shifters, as some combos won't work, especially in the front. I'm a big fan of 9 speed Shimano MTB parts... easily findable for small money, work flawlessly forever, about as durable as a shovel, even the XTR stuff, and consumables are everywhere and cheap.

But that's me. Build your bike your way... the frame is worthy and capable of whatever you want to do with it.

--Shannon

PS - Cannondale sez not to powdercoat their frames, as the temperatures involved can change the heat treating they did to the frames, resulting in a substantial loss of strength.
ShannonM is offline  
Old 07-20-21, 11:40 AM
  #14  
Bruce n Atlanta
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanx Shannon.... this is what I needed to hear. Great stuff.

I am looking at Shimano Deore parts.... apparently there is a major shortage going on at the moment...can't get the parts. I guess I will have to wait. Why Deore? I read they are the bottom of Shimano's "good stuff" while the Altus was middle of the "low line". So... upgrade time... why not?

My friends are telling me to dump the bike.... need to buy one at around $2,100 or just above... I don't mind doing this, but I just like the H400... it works for me and just needs some refresh... I have no complaints other than the worn drivetrain and love riding it. I can see no reason to spend that money.

BTW, I stopped into another bike store.... the tech said they don't do this kind of work given all the research etc.... they did say they would put the parts on for me. I can work on bikes, but I am in the process of a move, in temporary housing, and all tools etc. are in storage. I guess that may change for the better when the parts become available again. Stay tuned.

Thanx again,

Peace
Bruce in Atlanta

Last edited by Bruce n Atlanta; 07-20-21 at 11:51 AM.
Bruce n Atlanta is offline  
Old 07-20-21, 12:20 PM
  #15  
Keefusb
Keefusb
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Location: Ashland, VA
Posts: 92

Bikes: 60cm 1992 Paramount, 60cm 1995 Cannondale R900 (son's bike), 1994 Cannondale H300 (mine), 1994 Cannondale H300 Killer V (wife's bike), 60 cm 1989 Eddy Merckx Corsa Extra SLX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 13 Posts
If it were me, I would go ahead and fix up/overhaul the H400 and ride it around a while before I decided to spend $2000+ on a new bike. As has been mentioned multiple times on this thread, the H400 has a very nice, high-quality, unusual frame that you would be hard-pressed to beat in any hybrid or touring configuration. I have been riding this bike for 25 problem-free years. I'm mosly a roadie, but ride the Canonndale at least 1x per week to ride into town for coffee, or go on a weekend ride with my wife who also has an H300 in the "killer v" frame confiduration. I also put new "v-brakes" on both of the H300's, but have retained the original Grip Shift shifters, as they have worked flawlessly all these years with just regular adjustments and maintenance. I also put Shimano Ultegra 600 threaded headsets on both of our H300's, which is probably overkill, but those will likely be the last headsets those bikes will ever need. One thing that is standard that you will want to replace is the steel handlebar (heavy) for a decent aluminium version.

I think you have a nice frame that you can hang decent components on for not a lot of cash.
Keefusb is offline  
Old 07-21-21, 10:02 AM
  #16  
MNBikeCommuter
Senior Member
 
MNBikeCommuter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 796

Bikes: Cannondale '92 T600 '95 H600 '01 RT1000

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Liked 62 Times in 50 Posts
I would also recommend upgrading it in whatever manner suites you. I have a '95 H600 I bought new for Minnesota winters and it has about 26k tough miles on it now. After 12k, the rear rim blew out on me as it was worn down from the winter grit. I took that opportunity to build new wheels and upgrade from 7 spd to 9 spd with a mix of LX and XT parts (but also scoring XTR trigger shifters on clearance!). The headset gave out like headsets do and I splurged and put in a Chris King headset--a nice mango to go with the gloss black frame. And that gloss black has been easy to touch up as the frame corrodes (yes, aluminum corrodes with all the salt around here) with some Rustoleum primer and black gloss paint.
MNBikeCommuter is offline  
Old 07-22-21, 08:01 AM
  #17  
Bruce n Atlanta
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Update:

It looks like most of the components I want are out of stock everywhere and there are a few vendors selling some parts for big upcharges... in UK, China. I guess there really is a parts shortage. I guess I will have to wait.... I wonder for how long? A few months maybe? Again, thanx much for the information and encouragement.

Peace
Bruce in Atlanta
Bruce n Atlanta is offline  
Old 07-22-21, 09:09 AM
  #18  
Keefusb
Keefusb
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Location: Ashland, VA
Posts: 92

Bikes: 60cm 1992 Paramount, 60cm 1995 Cannondale R900 (son's bike), 1994 Cannondale H300 (mine), 1994 Cannondale H300 Killer V (wife's bike), 60 cm 1989 Eddy Merckx Corsa Extra SLX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 13 Posts
Just keep your eyes on eBay and Amazon, and be ready to pull the trigger when you see what you want at a decent price. I believe that the supply chain issues will sort themselves out over the the next few months unless there is a new Delta Variant-imposed lock down in Asia where most of these parts come from.
Keefusb is offline  
Old 07-22-21, 11:00 AM
  #19  
hokiefyd 
Senior Member
 
hokiefyd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Northern Shenandoah Valley
Posts: 3,946

Bikes: '18 Redline Zander, '14 Surly Pugsley, '97 GT Vantara, '97 Trek MultiTrack 750, '70 Peugeot UO-18 Mixte

Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1363 Post(s)
Liked 646 Times in 488 Posts
A late comment about the rivets. These commonly have heads behind the largest sprocket that can simply be ground off with a Dremel tool (an alternative to drilling). Grind the heads off, take a small punch and start driving the rivet back through the cassette towards the small sprockets, and they usually come out just fine. If you don't have a small punch, even just a Philips screwdriver will work. Punch the end of the rivet just low enough to where you can remove the largest sprocket. That now exposes fresh rivet...drive that down until you can remove the spacer. That now exposes fresh rivet...drive that down until you can remove the next sprocket...etc. It usually takes five minutes to disassemble a cassette in this way.

Granted, some newer cassettes have flush rivet heads which make it a little less easy. And some use screws instead of rivets, which are even easier. It just depends on the cassette.
hokiefyd is offline  
Old 07-22-21, 03:41 PM
  #20  
jimc101
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: West Yorkshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 5,730
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 430 Post(s)
Liked 77 Times in 67 Posts
Originally Posted by thook View Post
a cordless hand drill and cheap set of standard drill bits?
Sorry my lack of ownership of powertools makes me less of a person than you think I should be, I will end it all just to your life can be superior
jimc101 is offline  
Old 07-22-21, 04:32 PM
  #21  
thook
(rhymes with spook)
 
thook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Winslow, AR
Posts: 2,795

Bikes: '83 univega gran turismo x2, '85 schwinn super le tour,'89 miyata triple cross, '91 GT tequesta, '90 yokota grizzly peak, '94 GT backwoods, '95'ish scott tampico, '98 bonty privateer, '93 mongoose crossway 625, '98 parkpre ariel, 2k'ish giant fcr3

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 919 Post(s)
Liked 740 Times in 546 Posts
Originally Posted by jimc101 View Post
Sorry my lack of ownership of powertools makes me less of a person than you think I should be, I will end it all just to your life can be superior
what i said i had nothing to do with how you're reacting to it. i can see how you'd perceive it that way, but it's not the case. it's only my intention to make the point that it's not hard to modify a cassette and it doesn't require expensive or an usual array of tools as it seems to me the way you'd put it...which did perplex me a tad. neither here nor there because the OP isn't going go with the option, anyway...despite our differing opinions.
thook is offline  
Old 07-22-21, 06:02 PM
  #22  
jimc101
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: West Yorkshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 5,730
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 430 Post(s)
Liked 77 Times in 67 Posts
Originally Posted by thook View Post
what i said i had nothing to do with how you're reacting to it. i can see how you'd perceive it that way, but it's not the case. it's only my intention to make the point that it's not hard to modify a cassette and it doesn't require expensive or an usual array of tools as it seems to me the way you'd put it...which did perplex me a tad. neither here nor there because the OP isn't going go with the option, anyway...despite our differing opinions.
Well, yes it did, how you put it basically said, if you don't have lots of tools, your unworthy to exist, at least that's how it was easy to be read.
jimc101 is offline  
Old 07-22-21, 06:59 PM
  #23  
curbtender
Senior Member
 
curbtender's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SF Bay Area, East bay
Posts: 7,755

Bikes: Marinoni, Kestral 200 2002 Trek 5200, KHS Flite, Koga Miyata, Schwinn Spitfire 5, Schwinn Speedster, Mondia Special, Univega Alpina, Miyata team Ti, MB3

Mentioned: 45 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1266 Post(s)
Liked 1,426 Times in 756 Posts
Kind of like when mom told you a bedtime story and you woke up in the middle of the night looking for monsters under the bed.
I still think a donor bike would be the best solution.
curbtender is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2022 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.