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Suspension seatpost for captain?

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Suspension seatpost for captain?

Old 09-08-22, 03:34 PM
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Czech
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Suspension seatpost for captain?

Has anyone run a suspension seatpost with a stoker stem attached? I recently switched over to a riser stoker stem, which opens up this possibility. I struggle much more with saddle sores on the tandem than I do on my other bikes setup with the same geometry/saddles. I believe this is because of how stiff it is (08' alloy C'dale road tandem), or perhaps because it is more difficult to consistently get out of the saddle. I'm experimenting with saddles, but thought a suspension seatpost may be helpful as well. My wife and I typically do 50-100 mile rides on a mix of pavement and gravel.

I'd love know what your experiences have been and if there are other solutions captains have found for saddle sores on long touring/bikepacking rides?
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Old 09-08-22, 04:18 PM
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What size tires and psi are you running? We run 38mm at 55/60 psi and it provides a very comfortable ride smoothing out many of the bumps to the point that I got rid of my suspension post. Also a leather saddle will naturally have some "suspension" built in because of the design.
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Old 09-08-22, 04:23 PM
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We are also running 38mm, but closer to 80psi due to our rider weight and all of the gear we typically travel with. Going to try a leather saddle as well, but I am skeptical (albeit hopeful) that the saddle alone will solve my issue considering i have already tested several different saddles.
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Old 09-09-22, 06:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Czech View Post
We are also running 38mm, but closer to 80psi due to our rider weight and all of the gear we typically travel with. Going to try a leather saddle as well, but I am skeptical (albeit hopeful) that the saddle alone will solve my issue considering i have already tested several different saddles.
As a person ages, so does their skin, and saddle sore can become a problem. I had this problem near 55. I made 3 changes since then (not all at once) and have had no problems. Our tour this year was 2000 miles with camping gear, we do not use suspension posts. 1) 2 inch tires at 55 psi, road cracks are much less noticeable, handles trails better, stoker also happy. 2) Brooks saddles, it breathes, but takes many sweaty miles to break in, stoker also likes. 3) Daily butt butter and Neosporin. We do make an effort to stand while pedaling, but always did.

Good Luck

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Old 09-15-22, 12:34 AM
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If saddle sores are the question, a suspension post is not the answer. Saddle sores are caused by abrasion, not impact. They are also usually mildly infected. Padded shorts and chamois butter should do a lot to alleviate saddle sores. Saddle butter is mildly antiseptic. Neosporin seems like a good idea on its face but I wonder about the possibility of culturing an antibiotic resistant strain of something nasty with long term use. For a specific tour, why not, as a routine regimen, probably not. All suspension posts will steal energy from your pedaling effort. Few of us have any watts to spare (waste) heating up the elastomer of a suspension post.
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Old 09-22-22, 05:48 PM
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Not that I think lower pressure will resolve saddle sores, but lower tire pressure will make your ride better. I'm running 55 psi on 38c tires and don't feel any need for higher pressure and certainly don't bottom out.
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Old 10-19-22, 10:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Czech View Post
Has anyone run a suspension seatpost with a stoker stem attached? I recently switched over to a riser stoker stem, which opens up this possibility. I struggle much more with saddle sores on the tandem than I do on my other bikes setup with the same geometry/saddles. I believe this is because of how stiff it is (08' alloy C'dale road tandem), or perhaps because it is more difficult to consistently get out of the saddle. I'm experimenting with saddles, but thought a suspension seatpost may be helpful as well. My wife and I typically do 50-100 mile rides on a mix of pavement and gravel.

I'd love know what your experiences have been and if there are other solutions captains have found for saddle sores on long touring/bikepacking rides?
Check out Redshift Sports Shockstop Seatpost. I have been riding it on my single gravel bike for over a year without any issues and improved comfort on all surfaces! The suspension is adjustable with a simple screw mechanism. I am building a tandem and have two seatposts ready to roll for the extra comfort that they provide. check it out on their website redshiftsports(dot)com/products/shockstop-suspension-seatpost
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Old 10-20-22, 12:54 PM
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That's usually caused by the team not standing enough. Try standing for 1' every 10' by the clock. Most teams don't stand as much as they do on their singles. A mluvite tak česky?

The captain is suspended beautifully by tandem frame design, no need for a suspension post anyway.
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