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What is your preferred jockey wheel size?

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What is your preferred jockey wheel size?

Old 06-22-21, 04:44 AM
  #51  
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Originally Posted by Troul View Post
kinda related to the rear der topic; Why would the cage be a two piece clamshell when the wheels are riveted together? Seems the cage could be less of an intricate design & also reduce the material size when the chain is using a quick link. I have no problem fishing the chain thru the cage when it's a connected by such. It might be beneficial to have less material covering those plastic wheels to keep debris from lodging in the tight areas. Are there rear ders with good performance & reliability that I'm not privy of in existence like such?
I believe existing designs are lighter and stronger than what you are talking about. The cage also stops the chain from falling out of the derailleur.
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Old 06-22-21, 04:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Jax Rhapsody View Post
One of them on my Prelude was worn enough that the chain kept coming off of it. So there's that. I can't imagine them wearing fast on a newer bike, this is one of the last Chicago Schwinns, it took 30 something years of who knows what kinda riding to wear down. I've seen late 90s- 00s walmart bikes with jockey pulleys still with lots of life in them.
Tolerances change with respect to the rate a component is used (RPM) as well as the materials put in place to deal with galling [Friction, side loading, & other coefficients].
IE: Same usage applied (distance, duration, ~~~) ; A common 2x7 speed equipped with a rear der, in my opinion, would wear the jockey/idler less than a common 2x11. The components that make up the 7 speed system are generally more robust & has more clearance between the exposed parts. Which is less likely to contain the grime, grit & nasties that a 11 speed system may hoard as the 11 speed system is squished more together to fit in the confined space it has to work within.

I would like to find a rear 11 speed der that has a fixed fitted cage with the least shrouding cage of the two wheels that is direct compatible for an Ultegra Medium Cage Shadow [UMCS] RD 11-speed unit. The UMCS RD 11-speed unit works great when it's super clean, which lasts all of "11" miles with the surface conditions it's faced with. Just the other day I attempted a shift & the command was rejected due to a partial twig caught in the cage & arm area. As if the der is designed to be a manual street sweeper!
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Old 06-22-21, 04:54 AM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by subgrade View Post
On a related topic - what adverse effect comes from a worn tension pulley? Obviously, a worn guide pulley does negatively affect shifting precision and speed. But I suspect that with the tension pulley, given it spins freely and there is no play in the bearing, there shouldn't be much difference up until it is worn near round.

Am I wrong in thinking this?
Derailleurs have come with round jockey wheels as designed.

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Old 06-22-21, 04:59 AM
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Originally Posted by alo View Post
I believe existing designs are lighter and stronger than what you are talking about. The cage also stops the chain from falling out of the derailleur.
I'd still require the cage to have two sides, it would just have less material & be seamless in design requiring the chain to be fished through the cage body when maintenance requires the der or chain to be separately serviced off of the bicycle. The objective is to allow for foreign debris to escape the rear der rather than it collect in the component & cause performance issues.
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Old 06-22-21, 05:27 AM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
Derailleurs have come with round jockey wheels as designed.

The benefit of teeth, is probably to keep the chain on the jockey wheels. Shifting hard with round jockey wheels, may push the chain hard against the side of the cage. The chain probably does not come right off the jockey wheels, because there is not enough space.
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Old 06-22-21, 07:00 AM
  #56  
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Stock pulleys for me; since most of my bikes are 90s MTBs, I keep a stash of these around.

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Old 06-22-21, 07:05 AM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by alo View Post
The benefit of teeth, is probably to keep the chain on the jockey wheels. Shifting hard with round jockey wheels, may push the chain hard against the side of the cage. The chain probably does not come right off the jockey wheels, because there is not enough space.
30 years of production and millions of Schwinn and other brand10 speeds with Alvit derailleurs says it worked just fine.
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Old 06-22-21, 07:16 AM
  #58  
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Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
30 years of production and millions of Schwinn and other brand10 speeds with Alvit derailleurs says it worked just fine.
I am not disagreeing. However I am suggesting, shifting hard with round jockey wheels, may push the chain hard against the side of the cage. So the cage takes the lateral force. Whereas when jockey wheels have teeth, the jockey wheel itself can take the lateral force.
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