Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

How much am I losing by using clip pedals?

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

How much am I losing by using clip pedals?

Old 05-13-22, 01:22 PM
  #26  
blamester
Blamester
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Ireland
Posts: 1,002

Bikes: Peugeot teamline

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 247 Post(s)
Liked 103 Times in 87 Posts
I use trail running shoes or barefoot running shoes.
How much power do you gain from a carbon sole? And where does that energy go if you use running shoes, back up into your leg.
My foot is flexible and i think so should my shoes.
I am coming back from a broken femur and
clipless did not help at all in fact they held up progress.
I am 99 % better not just from the shoes but a combination of factors.
And remember La Vie Claire was set up to sell shoes and pedals. They got the best riders who where going to win and paid them a fortune.
They would have won in toeclips.
My advice is try everything and use what's best for you.
blamester is offline  
Old 05-13-22, 01:53 PM
  #27  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 26,894
Mentioned: 213 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15952 Post(s)
Liked 3,284 Times in 2,440 Posts
Somewhere I have my old leather shoes with cleats, but they've been hidden away for years. Presumably they hold the feet almost as secure as the clipless. But, a good part of my riding is commuting and errands, and I hated walking on those shoes.

I wore casual shoes with my toeclips for many years. Ultimately I chose to change to SPD due to the cage pedals being uncomfortable for longer rides.

And I plain LIKE the SPDs.
CliffordK is online now  
Old 05-13-22, 01:55 PM
  #28  
iab
Senior Member
 
iab's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: NW Burbs, Chicago
Posts: 11,330
Mentioned: 176 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2496 Post(s)
Liked 2,198 Times in 916 Posts
Ride what you prefer. Thinking one is better than another is just plain stupid.
iab is offline  
Old 05-13-22, 02:09 PM
  #29  
iab
Senior Member
 
iab's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: NW Burbs, Chicago
Posts: 11,330
Mentioned: 176 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2496 Post(s)
Liked 2,198 Times in 916 Posts
Originally Posted by bamboobike4 View Post
I can say, after watching a certain BF member ride Dairyland Dare on a 2-sp 1933 bike while wearing Vanns (I think) that I don't see a huge advantage in clipless, either.
I know that guy, not very bright that one.

The gearing in question was 42 up front and a 18/21/24 3-speed in back. Vans are too soft in the sole and not stylish enough. I believe they were Keens, but that was a decade ago.
iab is offline  
Likes For iab:
Old 05-13-22, 02:28 PM
  #30  
Germany_chris
Iím a little Surly
 
Germany_chris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Southern Germany
Posts: 1,938

Bikes: Two Cross Checks and a Karate Monkey

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 483 Post(s)
Liked 860 Times in 448 Posts
This isnít either or, it only takes a couple of minutes to change pedals.

Personally I donít see much of a point in using clips and straps unless you need them for Eroica or equivalent. Quality flats and shoes let you walk around more off the bike than clipless and probably give more grip than clips without cleats.
Germany_chris is offline  
Likes For Germany_chris:
Old 05-13-22, 02:41 PM
  #31  
randyjawa 
Senior Member
 
randyjawa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada - burrrrr!
Posts: 11,311

Bikes: 1958 Rabeneick 120D, 1968 Legnano Gran Premio, 196? Torpado Professional, 2000 Marinoni Piuma

Mentioned: 201 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1264 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1,365 Times in 771 Posts
Originally Posted by iab View Post
Ride what you prefer. Thinking one is better than another is just plain stupid.

I agree 100% with "ride what you prefer" but disagree with thinking one is better than the other is stupid seems wrong, in my opinion. Perhaps I am stupid but I honestly think my SPD pedals with recessed shoe clips is a far superior system.

First, entering and exiting the SPD is very simple to do once one learns how. There is never the need to bend down to strap in. And, though perhaps a bit silly, I love the "click" of engagement when the shoe snaps into place. Anyway...

There is never damage to one's shoes and shoes, these days are costly. There is never any damage to the crank arm, such as the strap rubbing off that anodized coating or even cutting into the soft alloy crank arm.

No matter where the crank arms are, when pushing the bike, they do not drag on the ground, an annoying problem with rats and traps. And, your foot is properly positioned immediately upon entry into the SPD with no amount of error. That all said...

I did indicate, in post #12, that I am not an expert and, to be honest, have not used rats and traps all that much. But I have used them and almost always find them awkward to enter. And, though I might be using rats and traps incorrectly, I do not think that they transmit power as effectively as the SPD system.

Based on all of the above advantages, that I see, I am not really sure that I am stupid for thinking the SPD system has distinct advantages over the old school rats and traps. Of course, none of what I just said answers the OP's original concern but I do think that it comes pretty close, from one man's point of view.

In closing, what systems do the Tour du France riders use?
__________________
"98% of the bikes I buy are projects".
randyjawa is online now  
Old 05-13-22, 02:44 PM
  #32  
iab
Senior Member
 
iab's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: NW Burbs, Chicago
Posts: 11,330
Mentioned: 176 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2496 Post(s)
Liked 2,198 Times in 916 Posts
Originally Posted by randyjawa View Post

In closing, what systems do the Tour du France riders use?
Comparing TdF riders with the likes in this forum is stupid. Sorry. And everything else you listed is a preference, not objectively "better".
iab is offline  
Likes For iab:
Old 05-13-22, 04:10 PM
  #33  
Drillium Dude 
Gone riding
 
Drillium Dude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 11,667
Mentioned: 242 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2213 Post(s)
Liked 3,338 Times in 1,207 Posts
Originally Posted by squirtdad View Post

IMHO the shoe you are wearing makes more difference that the clip or clipless systems, you get more efficiency from a stiff sole than a soft tennis shoe
Aaaaand there's the correct answer to the OP's query.

DD
__________________
My Flickr pics: https://www.flickr.com/photos/30331021@N08/

Drillium Dude is offline  
Old 05-13-22, 04:57 PM
  #34  
Biketiger
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Albuquerque
Posts: 173

Bikes: Track bike: 1978 Speedwell titanium Road bike: 2001 Independent Fabrication

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 74 Post(s)
Liked 52 Times in 42 Posts
Very interesting! I grew up riding cages with sneakers or whatever shoes I had and never knew the cage wasn't supposed to be in contact with the toe box.
It was the top of my cycling shoes (toe box) that was getting cut. On street shoes this wasn't a problem but the top of the shoe was always in contact with the cages because even large cages aren't big enough to fit a 9.5 size shoe without contact.
The problem with cages and street shoes is the laces would get caught. I use SPDs on all my road and track bikes. Cages on my cruisers but I prefer the All-City style double pronged cage - wider and much easier to slide in and out for me.




Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
Are you talking about the instep or on the top of the toebox? If it's the latter, the toebox should not be touching the toe clip. With the cleat properly positioned so that the ball of the foot is over the pedal spindle, there should be a small gap between the toebox and the toe clip. If not, you need a longer toe clip or to add washers between the pedal and toe clip mounting bracket. The toe clip is only to hold the strap open, to facilitate shoe entry and removal, and to hold the strap's position on the instep. The toe clip should not touch the shoe at any point other than in the immediate vicinity of the strap loop.

If you're talikng about the strap mounting loop on the instep, then the cleats should hold the shoes in a stable enough position that there should little, if any, movement between the shoe and toe clip. However, shoe damage in this are can reduced by fabricating a buffer between the shoe and toe clip. Cut a couple of slits in it, so that the toe strap can be fed through it, to hold it in place. You can use leatrher or any other suitable material. I made mine from old, thin, foam insoles. They may also ease some discomfort.

Biketiger is offline  
Old 05-13-22, 05:07 PM
  #35  
BFisher
Senior Member
 
BFisher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 2,188
Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 704 Post(s)
Liked 1,628 Times in 783 Posts
How much am I losing...?

Well, depending on whether you are coupling your pedal choice with wide or narrow tires at low or high pressures,
and if you happen to be using either wax or oil, or even WD40 as chain lube,
then you could be losing a whole lot. Or a little. You may even be gaining in some areas.
BFisher is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.