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Catching up after a while: Puncture resistant tires, shoes

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Catching up after a while: Puncture resistant tires, shoes

Old 06-24-21, 04:06 PM
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Excelsius
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Catching up after a while: Puncture resistant tires, shoes

It's been a very long time since I've bought much for my bike or looked up the latest trends. I'm doing RAGBRAI in a month and realized my shoes, my cleats, tires, they are all worn out beyond safety and becoming unglued. Though on the plus side, I can certainly say I've done this cycling sport on the cheap side.
  1. Is there some new technology that has allowed for a creation of puncture resistant tires that are still ok for occasional racing? I thought about getting Gatorskins, but I saw a lot of advice online about it's large rolling resistance and how those should not be used for racing. There is also the Continental 4 Seasons with a bit lower rolling and puncture resistance. Visiting a local bike shop, was surprised that Serfas Secas RS is still one of the recommended tires. That's exactly what I've had on my bike for the past 9+ years and they've provided decent protection (at this point, they're delaminating). Thus, I'm curious, what do you guys use for good puncture resistance and decent performance for the occasional race? A plus if replacing the tube is not difficult. I'm almost thinking about getting the same Serfas Seca, but I'm in a bit of disbelief that after 9 years there wouldn't be a newer, better tech. Want to make sure I'm not missing anything.
  2. Also need to replace my 10yr old shoes. Looking for something that's close to $100, SPD-SL cleats, easy to clean (no mesh), and tightens with a knob. Reading up online, seems like Specialized Torch 1.0 is one of the recommended ones. Any suggestions would be welcome.
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Old 06-24-21, 06:02 PM
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The bicylerollingresistance.com site gives the Pirelli Cinturato Velo TLR the highest puncture resistance rating, plus it scored pretty well on weight and rolling resistance.

It's available in tubed or tubeless style.

Tire ratings ordered by puncture resistance.
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Old 06-24-21, 06:14 PM
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Tubeless. But assuming you have non-TLR rims, another thing you may have missed is that riding wider tires is considered less flat-prone for most if you get a fast-rolling, supple tire run at lower pressure without significant (if any) loss to speed.

There are also new non-butyl inner tubes that are marketed as being more puncture-resistant while also adding less rolling resistance than the traditional butyl ones.
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Old 06-24-21, 08:15 PM
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Originally Posted by terrymorse View Post
The bicylerollingresistance.com site gives the Pirelli Cinturato Velo TLR the highest puncture resistance rating, plus it scored pretty well on weight and rolling resistance.

It's available in tubed or tubeless style.

Tire ratings ordered by puncture resistance.
Thanks for pointing that one out. Looks like a good choice. But I couldn't exactly find a tubed version of it. Is there like a different model for tubed? My concern with tubeless is that if I get a flat, then I'm done since it's not like I'm going to carry an extra tire with me. Whereas with a tube, I can replace it and be on my way.
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Old 06-24-21, 08:19 PM
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Originally Posted by surak View Post
Tubeless. But assuming you have non-TLR rims, another thing you may have missed is that riding wider tires is considered less flat-prone for most if you get a fast-rolling, supple tire run at lower pressure without significant (if any) loss to speed.

There are also new non-butyl inner tubes that are marketed as being more puncture-resistant while also adding less rolling resistance than the traditional butyl ones.
First time I'm hearing about TLR (tubeless ready?). I have Shimano RS10 rims, but can't find online so far if these are TLR rims or not. And yes, I actually stumbled upon a post here talking about wider tires and then went into a bit of a rabbit hole on google. Had no idea that my bike could even fit a 28mm tire, but it seems like it can and that's what I will be getting. I was at a bike shop yesterday too and did not buy any tires since they didn't have it in 23mm. Now I know why...
Seems like wider tires have lower rolling resistance, lower puncture rates, and provide a nicer ride. Glad I hadn't bought new tires before checking here.
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Old 06-24-21, 11:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Excelsius View Post
Thanks for pointing that one out. Looks like a good choice. But I couldn't exactly find a tubed version of it. Is there like a different model for tubed? My concern with tubeless is that if I get a flat, then I'm done since it's not like I'm going to carry an extra tire with me. Whereas with a tube, I can replace it and be on my way.
Here is the clincher version at Jenson.

EDIT: This Jenson link is to a different tire, the Pinarello P-Zero. Pinarello makes only a tubleless-ready version in the Cinturato Velo, which they state may be used in a "tubed or tubless configuration".

With a tubeless tire that’s punctured, you can insert a tube. Just remove the valve from the rim and insert the tube.
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Old 06-25-21, 05:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Excelsius View Post
Thanks for pointing that one out. Looks like a good choice. But I couldn't exactly find a tubed version of it. Is there like a different model for tubed? My concern with tubeless is that if I get a flat, then I'm done since it's not like I'm going to carry an extra tire with me. Whereas with a tube, I can replace it and be on my way.
There is only 1 model of the Pirelli Cinturato and you can run it either tubed or tubeless. I run this tyre tubeless and it is a very good all-round tyre with excellent puncture protection.
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Old 06-25-21, 05:04 AM
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Originally Posted by terrymorse View Post
Here is the clincher version at Jenson.
The P-Zero is not the same tyre as the Cinturato and doesn’t offer the same level of puncture protection. See my post above.
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Old 06-25-21, 05:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Excelsius View Post
Thanks for pointing that one out. Looks like a good choice. But I couldn't exactly find a tubed version of it. Is there like a different model for tubed? My concern with tubeless is that if I get a flat, then I'm done since it's not like I'm going to carry an extra tire with me. Whereas with a tube, I can replace it and be on my way.
You are far from done if you get a flat with tubeless tyres. You can plug most holes from the outside with a tubeless repair kit or simply fit a normal tube to get home.
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Old 06-25-21, 07:19 AM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
There is only 1 model of the Pirelli Cinturato and you can run it either tubed or tubeless. I run this tyre tubeless and it is a very good all-round tyre with excellent puncture protection.
Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
You are far from done if you get a flat with tubeless tyres. You can plug most holes from the outside with a tubeless repair kit or simply fit a normal tube to get home.
Alright, well, I guess tubeless it is. I have to get a tubeless conversion kit for my RS10 clinchers it seems, also a tubeless repair kit and hope that a 32mm tires will in fact fit my RS10 wheels on the CAAD10. Let me know if there are any kits that are recommended in this forum.

Thanks for the tip on the Cinturato. I doubt LBS will have it, but I'll call around today before ordering online.
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Old 06-25-21, 07:53 AM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
The P-Zero is not the same tyre as the Cinturato and doesn’t offer the same level of puncture protection. See my post above.
Oops, wrong link. Thanks for the catch.

The Pirelli site seems to imply there are two versions:

Originally Posted by pirelli.com
Sizes from 26-622 up to 35-622 make it ready for Granfondo riding as well as long adventures rides, all in a tube and/or TLR configuration

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Old 06-25-21, 07:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Excelsius View Post
Alright, well, I guess tubeless it is. I have to get a tubeless conversion kit for my RS10 clinchers it seems, also a tubeless repair kit and hope that a 32mm tires will in fact fit my RS10 wheels on the CAAD10. Let me know if there are any kits that are recommended in this forum.

Thanks for the tip on the Cinturato. I doubt LBS will have it, but I'll call around today before ordering online.
You can get the Cinturatos in 28 mm and less too if you are unsure. You could also just fit them with tubes and see how you go. You can always convert them to tubeless later on.
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Old 06-25-21, 08:12 AM
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Excelsius I wouldn’t muck around with a “tubeless conversion kit” if I were you. Heck, ai wouldn’t do it myself, and I’ve been on road tubeless for about seven years now. There’s too much to go wrong hacking it; get a tubeless compatible wheelset or forget it, that’s my advice.

My suggestion to you is to get a pair of Schwalbe Aerothan inner tubes and pair them up to the Pirelli Cinturato Velos or some other tire as you prefer. As noted upthread, TPU tubes like Aerothan are lighter than standard tubes, more puncture and flat resistant, and have lower rolling resistance.
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Old 06-25-21, 09:35 AM
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Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
Excelsius I wouldn’t muck around with a “tubeless conversion kit” if I were you. Heck, ai wouldn’t do it myself, and I’ve been on road tubeless for about seven years now. There’s too much to go wrong hacking it; get a tubeless compatible wheelset or forget it, that’s my advice.

My suggestion to you is to get a pair of Schwalbe Aerothan inner tubes and pair them up to the Pirelli Cinturato Velos or some other tire as you prefer. As noted upthread, TPU tubes like Aerothan are lighter than standard tubes, more puncture and flat resistant, and have lower rolling resistance.
Are you aware of particular issues for the conversion? From what I read, it seems all rims should be "TLR".
Aerothan is an interesting concept, but at $30/piece plus inability to repair, I'm not sure it's a good investment. If the tire is protecting from flats already, not sure if the tube would be important because if anything can get through a tough tire, the tube wouldn't stand a chance. But I would have to buy new tubes since the ones I have only cover up to 25mm. Maybe if there are cheaper alternatives, wouldn't hurt if the tube is somewhat puncture resistant as well.
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Old 06-25-21, 09:52 AM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
There is only 1 model of the Pirelli Cinturato and you can run it either tubed or tubeless. I run this tyre tubeless and it is a very good all-round tyre with excellent puncture protection.

Just put Pirelli Velos on my bike 2 days ago. I’ve put 20 miles on them…and am really liking them so far
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Old 06-25-21, 10:44 AM
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Catching up after a while: Puncture resistant tires, shoes

To the topic: puncture resistant ... shoes. I've got 'em. Not great riding and they weigh a lot but if a fight breaks out after too many beers, really good for **** kicking! Steel toed work boots. Carolinas. All day comfortable. Good looking leather. Toe and sole completely resistant to glass, debris and goat heads.
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Old 06-25-21, 11:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Excelsius View Post
Are you aware of particular issues for the conversion? From what I read, it seems all rims should be "TLR".
Aerothan is an interesting concept, but at $30/piece plus inability to repair, I'm not sure it's a good investment. If the tire is protecting from flats already, not sure if the tube would be important because if anything can get through a tough tire, the tube wouldn't stand a chance. But I would have to buy new tubes since the ones I have only cover up to 25mm. Maybe if there are cheaper alternatives, wouldn't hurt if the tube is somewhat puncture resistant as well.
The possible problems are myriad and not exclusively to do with conversion of standard rims. Just take a quick look for tubeless setup topics, and you'll find plenty to be concerned about. That's not to say you cannot and won't get a combo which sets up perfectly, but there's a chance a may not, and you could find yourself struggling to make things work, which could include a problem like slow leak-down on the road. With only a month or so until RAGBRAI, speaking as a longtime road tubeless user who just reverse converted one of my five tubeless setups to tubes (granted, due to the tires), I wouldn't risk the stress.

Aerothan can be patched with glueless (i.e. self-adhesive) patches per Schwalbe.

The Pirelli Cinturato Velo is impressively puncture resistant, but it's not puncture proof, nor is it flat-proof. I don't believe it is true that if an object penetrates the tire, the tube necessarily will be punctured; there are a lot of factors at play there, but if the tube is resilient enough to deform around the intrusion, it won't puncture, and Schwalbe reports Aerothan can resist the intrusion of a 1mm plunger with far greater force than any other tube material, and for a distance equivalent to latex tubes.

Whether the extra protection is worth $30/tube is a fair question, but the cost also includes reduced rolling resistance and substantial weight savings compared to typical (butyl) tubes. I weighed a Specialized 20-28c tube at 113g, while Aerothan for that size is 41g, saving 144g per pair (pretty close to 1/3lbs), which is a whopping return for my money. Again, whether any of that is worth $60 to you is for you to decide, but when comparing to tubeless setup costs, don't forget to factor in the fixed cost of rim tape, sealant, and valves. It may only be like a $20 premium to run Aerothan.
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Old 06-25-21, 02:55 PM
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Originally Posted by terrymorse View Post

The Pirelli site seems to imply there are two versions:
No, there is just one version of the Cinturato, which can be run either tubed or tubeless, hence 2 configurations of the same tyre.

The P-Zero on the other hand comes in specific tube only and now a TLR version.
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Old 06-25-21, 02:59 PM
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Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
Excelsius I wouldn’t muck around with a “tubeless conversion kit” if I were you. Heck, ai wouldn’t do it myself, and I’ve been on road tubeless for about seven years now. There’s too much to go wrong hacking it; get a tubeless compatible wheelset or forget it, that’s my advice.

My suggestion to you is to get a pair of Schwalbe Aerothan inner tubes and pair them up to the Pirelli Cinturato Velos or some other tire as you prefer. As noted upthread, TPU tubes like Aerothan are lighter than standard tubes, more puncture and flat resistant, and have lower rolling resistance.
As much as I like tubeless, I would agree with this advice with those rims. But I would just run ordinary tubes if you want to keep the cost down as this tyre is very puncture resistant indeed.
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Old 06-25-21, 05:20 PM
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Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
The possible problems are myriad and not exclusively to do with conversion of standard rims. Just take a quick look for tubeless setup topics, and you'll find plenty to be concerned about. That's not to say you cannot and won't get a combo which sets up perfectly, but there's a chance a may not, and you could find yourself struggling to make things work, which could include a problem like slow leak-down on the road. With only a month or so until RAGBRAI, speaking as a longtime road tubeless user who just reverse converted one of my five tubeless setups to tubes (granted, due to the tires), I wouldn't risk the stress.

Aerothan can be patched with glueless (i.e. self-adhesive) patches per Schwalbe.

The Pirelli Cinturato Velo is impressively puncture resistant, but it's not puncture proof, nor is it flat-proof. I don't believe it is true that if an object penetrates the tire, the tube necessarily will be punctured; there are a lot of factors at play there, but if the tube is resilient enough to deform around the intrusion, it won't puncture, and Schwalbe reports Aerothan can resist the intrusion of a 1mm plunger with far greater force than any other tube material, and for a distance equivalent to latex tubes.

Whether the extra protection is worth $30/tube is a fair question, but the cost also includes reduced rolling resistance and substantial weight savings compared to typical (butyl) tubes. I weighed a Specialized 20-28c tube at 113g, while Aerothan for that size is 41g, saving 144g per pair (pretty close to 1/3lbs), which is a whopping return for my money. Again, whether any of that is worth $60 to you is for you to decide, but when comparing to tubeless setup costs, don't forget to factor in the fixed cost of rim tape, sealant, and valves. It may only be like a $20 premium to run Aerothan.
Makes sense. Wouldn't be the time to experiment with tubeless in that case. I ordered the tires and in fact the Endurance version of Aerothan as well since I found them on sale on Amazon for $21. Actually, looking at tubes, I saw that the prices have gone up quite a bit since the last time I had stocked up on them many years ago at about $2/piece. Now, inner tubes are running $8 and if you want a bit heftier ones, they already run $15 with "thorn resistance." If the Aerothan really lasts, could be a while before I need to buy another tube. Anything to save time since I really dislike replacing the tubes.
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Old 06-26-21, 07:13 PM
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For shoes, just picked up Shimano XC7, a tad more but very comfortable. Features Boa tech and carbon midsole. My old Shimano MTB shoes are comfy also, so I stuck with Shimano.
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Old 06-26-21, 10:01 PM
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Originally Posted by yashinon View Post
For shoes, just picked up Shimano XC7, a tad more but very comfortable. Features Boa tech and carbon midsole. My old Shimano MTB shoes are comfy also, so I stuck with Shimano.
Well, XC7 is over $200, more than twice the cost of Torch 1.0. I picked it up today for $109, which is closer to my budget. On the other hand, I did go all in on a bike computer and finally upgraded by Edge 500 to Edge 830. Can't wait to try out the navigation when it arrives tomorrow. I've been relying on my phone and google maps, but it hasn't worked well when I get off the path.
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Old 06-27-21, 06:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Excelsius View Post
Well, XC7 is over $200, more than twice the cost of Torch 1.0. I picked it up today for $109, which is closer to my budget. On the other hand, I did go all in on a bike computer and finally upgraded by Edge 500 to Edge 830. Can't wait to try out the navigation when it arrives tomorrow. I've been relying on my phone and google maps, but it hasn't worked well when I get off the path.

I also have the XC7, been riding them for 6 months and they are fantastic. Would be worth a look even though they are over the budget. Also, Lordgun has Pirelli's in stock and they shipped ridiculously fast from Italy. I got my P Zero Race Classics in 28mm in 3 days. I live on the east coast.
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Old 06-27-21, 08:00 AM
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Originally Posted by jaxgtr View Post
I also have the XC7, been riding them for 6 months and they are fantastic. Would be worth a look even though they are over the budget. Also, Lordgun has Pirelli's in stock and they shipped ridiculously fast from Italy. I got my P Zero Race Classics in 28mm in 3 days. I live on the east coast.
I paid $63/piece for the Pirelli tires on Amazon vs $45 in your link, but did get free shipping instead of $18+ at lordgun. Still, could have saved 18 bucks by ordering from Lordgun, but too late since the tires are arriving today. If the 28mm doesn't fit my CAAD10, then I'll return and order 25mm from lordgun, so thanks for that link.

Nah, my cheaper Diadora D-skin shoes have served me well. Don't recall the exact model, but they were sub $90 when I bought 9 or so years ago. Sometimes I just hop on my bike even with my running sneakers for sub 30 mile trail rides. I can return the Toch 1.0 if I don't like them during the ride, which I have yet to try. The cleat setup is a bit of PIA to get right.
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Old 06-27-21, 09:28 AM
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Originally Posted by yashinon View Post
For shoes, just picked up Shimano XC7, a tad more but very comfortable. Features Boa tech and carbon midsole. My old Shimano MTB shoes are comfy also, so I stuck with Shimano.
I have a pair of XC7, but I never really got on with them. Mainly found them a bit too narrow in the toe-box for my fairly wide feet. But they do a wide fit version, which may have been better for me. I found them a bit sweaty too in hot weather.
I replaced them quite quickly with Fizik R4 Tempo (Wide fit) and find these far more comfortable. They are slightly less stiff, but I find that a good thing for longer rides. They breathe better too and the uppers are generally more comfortable. They have a single Boa, but it's the more advanced type that micro-adjusts in both directions. The RC7 Boas only micro adjust tighter, so if you over-tighten them you have to completely release them and start again. Not a big deal, but worth knowing.
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