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Breezer Radar Expert

Old 11-19-21, 06:05 AM
  #1  
utoner34
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Breezer Radar Expert

I am looking for me next touring bike. What are your opinion on this bike? Good / bad points? Personally I am thinking of changing HYRD brakes calipers with sypre since I dont need hydraulic.

https://www.breezerbikes.com/bikes/a...r/radar-expert

Recently I realized I am not the biggest most fan of touring bikes geometry. I wish I could find a streel bike with geometry similar to gravel bikes. I spent this summer riding a gravel bike (Nuroad Pro) for along time and with a lot of luggage (not for a cross continent but still a lot) and I never had any issues with handling or comfort. What I dont like with most touring bikes it their too relaxed riding position, which is supposed to make them more comfortable (makes sense on long journeys) but the compromise is that they fell very slow and I dont like climbing with them. If I want more comfortable bike I would just add more upright stem while still retaining more "racy" geometry.

What are jour thoughts?
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Old 11-19-21, 07:24 AM
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Quick thoughts
-yes I get liking a quick handling bike, but it's all in personal perception. What I think is fine might be what you think is too fast or two slow, so really up to you. 11 years ago I did buy a cross bike to replace my old touring bike, and liked how it was more responsive, so I do get it.
- gearing, this double will be overgeared for touring, for me anyway.
- re changing to mechanical , you'll have to change the brifters, mucho money, so be aware and inform yourself about costs and real life availability of parts
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Old 11-22-21, 09:29 PM
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I generally look at fit being a separate issue form frame geometry. There's a lot of overlap WRT fitting the rider between a touring bike and a more spritely one (like a "club" bike which is now very close to what we call a gravel bike, at least frame geometry wise). Andy
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Old 11-23-21, 06:36 AM
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I certainly agree Andy, and even find that it's a bonus having a sprightly riding bike unloaded, cuz it's fun, and then when you put panniers or whatever else on it, the steering slows down but is still nicer to avoid potholes or whatever--ie still fun.

This is why I love my 26" Troll, kinda a mountainbikey designed bike, but with various bars, tires, it's a competent tourer that still retains fun steering characteristics with various loads on it.
cheers
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Old 11-23-21, 09:09 AM
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Here's the thing: Everybody is different. I mean, I am short (5' - 6") and looking at the geometry the xs would never work for me as the 57. 5 cm top tube is just too long. (55cm) is the absolute longest I could ride. Because of my short thighs, a 75 degree seat tube would be better suited for me also.
I just built a frame, and it has a slightly steeper head angle (71 degrees), because I also fit into that category of not wanting "lax" geometry.
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Old 11-23-21, 10:40 AM
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Originally Posted by utoner34 View Post
I am looking for me next touring bike. What are your opinion on this bike? Good / bad points? Personally I am thinking of changing HYRD brakes calipers with sypre since I dont need hydraulic.

https://www.breezerbikes.com/bikes/a...r/radar-expert

Recently I realized I am not the biggest most fan of touring bikes geometry. I wish I could find a streel bike with geometry similar to gravel bikes. I spent this summer riding a gravel bike (Nuroad Pro) for along time and with a lot of luggage (not for a cross continent but still a lot) and I never had any issues with handling or comfort. What I dont like with most touring bikes it their too relaxed riding position, which is supposed to make them more comfortable (makes sense on long journeys) but the compromise is that they fell very slow and I dont like climbing with them. If I want more comfortable bike I would just add more upright stem while still retaining more "racy" geometry.

What are jour thoughts?
Breezer Radar is more flexible than a "real" touring bike so it wobbles a bit if loaded up with 40+ lbs. The Hy/Rd brakes are great - that's the last thing I'd replace. Geometry is more or less typical gravel but with long chainstays.
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Old 11-23-21, 10:44 AM
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Originally Posted by tyrion View Post
The Hy/Rd brakes are great - that's the last thing I'd replace.
What if you need to bleed the brakes in Namibia?
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Old 11-23-21, 11:05 AM
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Originally Posted by utoner34 View Post
What if you need to bleed the brakes in Namibia?
I don't know why you'd need to bleed them other than scheduled fluid change or you're overhauling the brakes. It's a pretty closed, sealed up system. It's a cable-actuated hydraulic system.
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Old 11-23-21, 11:16 AM
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Originally Posted by utoner34 View Post
What if you need to bleed the brakes in Namibia?
Utoner, given that this is your first response on the topic, you might want to elaborate on what you're looking for, specifically on what sort of touring you want to do.
​​​​​​There are steel options, but who knows where you're going with what you want in a touring bike.
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Old 11-23-21, 12:19 PM
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Originally Posted by tyrion View Post
I don't know why you'd need to bleed them other than scheduled fluid change or you're overhauling the brakes. It's a pretty closed, sealed up system. It's a cable-actuated hydraulic system.
I know its closed system, but don't hydro brakes need maintenance?

Originally Posted by djb View Post
Utoner, given that this is your first response on the topic, you might want to elaborate on what you're looking for, specifically on what sort of touring you want to do.
​​​​​​There are steel options, but who knows where you're going with what you want in a touring bike.
Well, I want a steel bike for when I finally persuade myself to go long way from home (across Asia etc...).
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Old 11-23-21, 01:13 PM
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Originally Posted by utoner34 View Post
I know its closed system, but don't hydro brakes need maintenance?
I don't really know what kind of maintenance these brakes need. I haven't done anything but change the pads in the 3 years I've had them. The instructions are basically "bleed them after you open them up or if they feel mushy", and they don't feel mushy yet.

But if you're looking for something very field-serviceable, these might not be it.
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Old 11-23-21, 02:28 PM
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Originally Posted by utoner34 View Post
Well, I want a steel bike for when I finally persuade myself to go long way from home (across Asia etc...).
ahh. Well, going from my traveling experiences, I still would go for other options, or think about frame only and build up with parts of your choosing--especially if you are actually serious about crossing Asia. Don't know what touring experience you have, but I would absolutely go mechanical disc and lower gearing. Lower gearing simply from having to carry a fair amount of weight that comes with the type of. trips that you are dreaming of.
I'm coming from my experiences and preference for the type of bike and specific setup for these sort of trips.
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Old 11-26-21, 01:29 PM
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I bought a Breezer Radar to tour on and it has quickly become my favorite all around bike. Steel frame, 5 water bottle/rack mounts, wide bars- it's all I hoped for. I put on a 105 groupset for more roadability and had some wheels built and it really has been fun. I should tell you the frame cage is 73mm so you will be limited to MTB cranks; my 68mm road 52/11 crank is in there but 5mm short. The shop that put it together never said a word but I have almost 20,000 miles on it (I'm planning on replacing it now that I know) and it's doing fine. At any rate, it's been a wonderful ride on several long tours. The HY/RDs are still going strong on the 4th set of pads.

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Old 11-29-21, 01:40 PM
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Which frame size is that?

Are HY/RD mushy?
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Old 12-02-21, 07:56 AM
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It's an XL, their largest size. HY/RDs aren't 'throw you over the bars' strong but they work really well for aggressive city riding. You definitely know when you need new pads as they fade rather abruptly.
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Old 12-02-21, 11:16 PM
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Originally Posted by utoner34 View Post
I am looking for me next touring bike. What are your opinion on this bike? Good / bad points? Personally I am thinking of changing HYRD brakes calipers with sypre since I dont need hydraulic.

https://www.breezerbikes.com/bikes/a...r/radar-expert

Recently I realized I am not the biggest most fan of touring bikes geometry. I wish I could find a streel bike with geometry similar to gravel bikes. I spent this summer riding a gravel bike (Nuroad Pro) for along time and with a lot of luggage (not for a cross continent but still a lot) and I never had any issues with handling or comfort. What I dont like with most touring bikes it their too relaxed riding position, which is supposed to make them more comfortable (makes sense on long journeys) but the compromise is that they fell very slow and I dont like climbing with them. If I want more comfortable bike I would just add more upright stem while still retaining more "racy" geometry.

What are jour thoughts?
Looks like a capable bike. The two concerns I have are the short chain stays might cause heel strike with panniers and without knowing the geography of where you tour, 30X36 gearing might be a little high for a fully loaded bike on long climbs
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Old 12-06-21, 01:29 AM
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Originally Posted by MarcusT View Post
Looks like a capable bike. The two concerns I have are the short chain stays might cause heel strike with panniers and without knowing the geography of where you tour, 30X36 gearing might be a little high for a fully loaded bike on long climbs
?? Since when are 457 mm stays short?? Surly Crosscheck and Midnight Special are 430. The LHT went down 15 to 445. The wheel base is nicely long, IMO.
30x36T = 24.5 GI, yah higher than 80% or so use.
IF a 44/ 28T crank, then it's 22.5 to 115.8. Could do with a bit lower, not too bad if the bike is 70 lbs.
Mine was 120 lbs. with my Rohloff14, that was 21.8 to 114.6.
This bike is especially suited for changing to swept bars, with a long TT. Overall it's better than both Surly and Trek 520, et al. IMO. At least the rear isn't stupid thru axle. Just perfect amount of TT slope, with the stays welded as high as possible.

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Old 12-06-21, 07:17 AM
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Kona Sutra looks like much more "sporty" bike to me (I might be wrong). Its hard to find something more sporty (with steel frame and fork) than a regular touring bike.
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Old 12-06-21, 09:10 AM
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Originally Posted by utoner34 View Post
Kona Sutra looks like much more "sporty" bike to me (I might be wrong). Its hard to find something more sporty (with steel frame and fork) than a regular touring bike.
it really will come down to what sort of touring you are actually going to do, and then accepting that you can't get a really sporty bike that also will work well doing certain types of touring competently. You can find pretty good imbetweens, my cross bike is a good example, but there are always going to be some compromises of weight, gearing, how the frame works with heavier loads, and then you also get into the cost issue of much much lighter touring equipment (tents, sleeping bags etc) and figuring out what works for you comfort wise, ie how lightweight you can go for a given range of expected temperatures and weather.

there's no real magic bike that will be great for all things, but you just have to figure out what areas you want a bike to work well.
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