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Runner Turned Cyclist? Need Advice

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Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Runner Turned Cyclist? Need Advice

Old 08-15-22, 01:29 PM
  #26  
VegasJen
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
Your posting history indicates that you don't know much about much when it comes to cycling. Maybe you should save the aspersions for later.
I know I'm going to get a lot of hate for my comment but I'm OK with that. But then there's this...

And this...
So like I said, you do you.
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Old 08-15-22, 01:38 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by VegasJen View Post
I know I'm going to get a lot of hate for my comment but I'm OK with that. But then there's this...

And this...

So like I said, you do you.
You can peruse YouTube videos - good for you, but you still don't know much about much when it comes to cycling. There are many reasons to that people use clipless. I have no problems with people doing whatever works for them, but I will push back when someone suggests that the use of something as ubiquitous as clipless pedals is merely vanity, 'specially when that someone is clearly a confused noob.

Learn more, judge less.
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Old 08-15-22, 01:41 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by whyfi View Post
you can peruse youtube videos - good for you, but you still don't know much about much when it comes to cycling. There are many reasons to that people use clipless. I have no problems with people doing whatever works for them, but i will push back when someone suggests that the use of something as ubiquitous as clipless pedals is merely vanity, 'specially when that someone is clearly a confused noob.

Learn more, judge less.
ok.
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Old 08-15-22, 03:10 PM
  #29  
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As a previous poster suggested - do you know how big the frame is? Assuming you're in the USA and using imperial measurements for height, a 5'10" person will ride between a 54-56cm bike. For every 3" of difference, go up or down 2cm. I have three bikes that are 54cm, 55cm, and M/L, and they all fit a little differently for different purposes. Without knowing your height or the bike's size (a pic would help), we wouldn't really be able to give an opinion.

As for maintenance, you should ask what the $450 covers. If the bike actually does fit, and $450 gets it working perfectly, then maybe - but chances are that's not the case. If the bike's been sitting neglected for most of a decade, you're looking at least at new cables, housing, and brake pads. There's no guarantee if the wheel, bottom bracket, or headset bearings are any good, and repacking those could cost a fistful of dollars. Truing and tensioning the wheels, along with fresh tires, would be a few dollars more. This isn't taking into account new parts that may have to be sourced, too. Just for reference, I didn't have time to redo my own brakes one year before a Gran Fondo, so I sent it to a shop for pads, cables, housing, and new bar tape. Just that ran me $150.

If you're not yet comfortable riding at 24mph, I wouldn't worry about racing yet. I cruise at ~18mph and hit 23-24mph on long shallow descents, and I'm far too fat and slow to race anybody!

As for clipless pedals, I find them very useful in expanding the range at which I can apply pressure to the pedal - down past the 6pm position, to about 7pm. With flat pedals, you lose torque pretty much right at the bottom. Additionally, they help keep your feet on the pedals when your cadence starts getting past 80-90rpm.

My recommendation would be to take the bike to the shop, let them a) size you up, see if it's in the right ballpark, and b) tell you exactly what it is they'll be doing - they'll be able to tell you pretty quickly if it's just basic tuneup, or if the pads, tires, cables need replacing, or if you're looking at new bearings/shifters/other parts. I'd probably hold the line at closer to $200. Any more, and you might as well see what else is out there.
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Old 08-15-22, 07:41 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by VegasJen View Post
OP, you didn't say, but what kind of "racing" are you interested in? I do triathlons and I use a road bike for it (now) but I'm shopping for a triathlon bike. What kind of racing you want to do will influence what kind of bike you want to get.
I've now done both flat pedals and clipped in. Honestly, I think it's all personal preference, but for me, I'm comfortable with flat pedals. I think it's something everybody should try, and give both a fair chance, but for the majority of people out there I think clipping in is kind of like buying jerseys with sponsor names on it. Mostly for show. But you know, you do you.

I'm curious too. Bike fit is very individualized. I'm 5'4", but I have relatively short legs so I typically ride a 49 or 50cm bike. I've ridden a 54cm bike before, but that's on the very ragged edge of just being too big.
At present, I prefer flat pedals as well.

But under more ideal situation (more cows around than cars), I would have gone clipless as well even though I don't pull up. They do make a difference at high cadence and when doing steep climbs.
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Old 08-15-22, 07:56 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by C_Myers22 View Post
1. I am terrified of going fast. Anything over 24mph feels like I am going to crash and die. Going downhill is even worse. Is this just something that takes time to get better at?
I'm also a runner turned cyclist. Been riding a bit less than five years. I do recall being very tentative the first several months I was riding. Over time, you'll gain confidence and feel more comfortable at faster speeds. But you can ride too fast for conditions and risk a crash. So, don't ride so fast that you feel like you will crash and die, and over time the speeds you feel comfortable riding will increase. That was my experience.
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Old 08-15-22, 09:36 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by terrymorse View Post
This "pull up" vs. "don't pull up" on the pedals discussion is somewhat of a simplification. In reality, there is plenty of pushing and pulling in different directions throughout the pedal cycle.

Different muscles are engaging throughout the pedal cycle to make the pedals go in circles, pushing forward on the pedals near the top, pushing down and forward in the first quadrant (0º-90º), pulling back in the next two quadrants (140º-270º), pulling up in the last quadrant (270º-360º).

Here is what the quadriceps and hamstrings are doing throughout the pedal cycle. I've marked the graphs with what the muscles are doing, either flexion (bending) or extension (straightening) a joint.


Roughly, the hamstrings extend (straighten) the hip joint on the down stroke (pushing down on pedals), flex (bend) the knee around the bottom of the stroke (pulling back on pedals).

Also roughly, the quads extend (straighten) the knee on the down stroke (pushing forward on pedals), flex (bend) the hip on the up stroke (pulling up on pedals).

The charts below on the left is crank force data from competitive and recreational road cyclists. If these cyclists are recruiting their muscles in similar manner to your charts, then they're wasting a significant amount of effort from around 180 to 360 degrees of the crank angle. You'll see the pull up force they make on the upstroke is very little to matter at all and they can only pull the pedals up at low cadence (60 rpm) which is not really an efficient cadence especially for long distance riding.

The colored chart on the right is how I recruit my muscles in the full rotation of the crank (this is perceived effort, not actual force on the crank). Note, I actively recruit the glutes too to avoid overworking the quads and the knees. Link to the left charts: https://www.researchgate.net/publica...during_cycling


Last edited by koala logs; 08-15-22 at 09:47 PM.
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Old 08-15-22, 09:38 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by koala logs View Post
At present, I prefer flat pedals as well.

But under more ideal situation (more cows around than cars), I would have gone clipless as well even though I don't pull up. They do make a difference at high cadence and when doing steep climbs.
I get it. I bought a pair of used Sidi cycling shoes about a month ago just to give it a try, so at least I'm speaking from some degree of personal experience. So far, I've gotten 5-6 rides and about 150 miles on with them. Far from anything conclusive and I always reserve the right to change my mind, but my initial impression is there are pros and cons to both. At this point, for me, I'm happy with flats but as fate would have it, I'm going to go pick up another pair of cycling shoes tomorrow. I might end up being a convert in the long run but my suggestion for a new cyclist stands, flats are fine until you figure out what kind of cycling you want to do.
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Old 08-15-22, 09:56 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by Random11 View Post
and over time the speeds you feel comfortable riding will increase.
This happened with me and I hit 50mph or more with abandon. At some point I started thinking about it and now I try to dial it back a bit.
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Old 08-15-22, 11:48 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by big john View Post
This happened with me and I hit 50mph or more with abandon. At some point I started thinking about it and now I try to dial it back a bit.
There is one stretch of a highway I routinely ride that has a 2-3* downhill grade for about three miles. I can get cooking on that section. Except on windy days, I'm always down on my aero bars, which don't afford the best stability and control anyway. I know at times I'm doing 30mph+. Scary as hell and I know if anything bad happens, there's a really good chance I don't just walk away.

Still do it though.
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Old 08-16-22, 12:07 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by VegasJen View Post
I get it. I bought a pair of used Sidi cycling shoes about a month ago just to give it a try, so at least I'm speaking from some degree of personal experience. So far, I've gotten 5-6 rides and about 150 miles on with them. Far from anything conclusive and I always reserve the right to change my mind, but my initial impression is there are pros and cons to both. At this point, for me, I'm happy with flats but as fate would have it, I'm going to go pick up another pair of cycling shoes tomorrow. I might end up being a convert in the long run but my suggestion for a new cyclist stands, flats are fine until you figure out what kind of cycling you want to do.
I pull up a little which makes me a bit more efficient with clipless. But I only pull up to unload the pedals. It only takes very little effort to do it.

You can also do it with flat pedals with practice, pull your feet up in the upstroke just enough to unload the pedals but not too much the feet leaves the pedals. The technique can give around 1-2 mph boost in cruise speed. It's not much but it's almost free boost in speed!
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Old 08-16-22, 12:20 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by VegasJen View Post
I know I'm going to get a lot of hate for my comment but I'm OK with that. But then there's this...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNedIJBZpgM
I'd like to do a short summary of that vid because I happened to know a little bit more details about Simon in the video.

The results show lower perceived effort for Simon using clipless pedals.

However, the metabolic cost is also slightly higher for clipless. This means Simon is actually slightly more efficient with flat pedals than clipless!

Additionally, Simon in another video admits that he pulls in the upstroke while also saying that Pros typically don't. He also gave advice that recreational riders should pull up, contrary to the knowledge he shared that Pros don't usually do it. That might be due to the high cadence of pros making it inefficient to pull or even try to "pedal in circles".

Also given the fact that Simon never uses flat pedals unless when doing flat pedal experiments for GCN which is very rare and still he end up being slightly more efficient in one! Which only means had Simon been using flat pedals all the time, the results of the test in the video would have even more strongly leaned towards the flat pedals!
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Old 08-16-22, 12:29 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by koala logs View Post
I'd like to do a short summary of that vid because I happened to know a little bit more details about Simon in the video.

The results show lower perceived effort for Simon using clipless pedals.

However, the metabolic cost is also slightly higher for clipless. This means Simon is actually slightly more efficient with flat pedals than clipless!

Additionally, Simon in another video admits that he pulls in the upstroke while also saying that Pros typically don't. He also gave advice that recreational riders should pull up, contrary to the knowledge he shared that Pros don't usually do it. That might be due to the high cadence of pros making it inefficient to pull or even try to "pedal in circles".

Also given the fact that Simon never uses flat pedals unless when doing flat pedal experiments for GCN which is very rare and still he end up being slightly more efficient in one! Which only means had Simon been using flat pedals all the time, the results of the test in the video would have even more strongly leaned towards the flat pedals!
As I stated above, my very limited experience so far leads me to conclude there are pros and cons to both. The biggest "pro" I have noticed clipped in is the extra torque I can apply when I'm really cranking, like standing up to sprint. It's not sustainable though.

But I agree with you, I think for every day riding, the main advantage, as you said, is unloading the pedal on the upstroke. But also as you said, you can quite easily do this with flats too.

For me, the biggest "con" with clipping in is primarily the cost. Unless you're like me and buy a lot of used stuff, a new set of SPDs and good cycling shoes is going to run someone in the $200-300 range. Of course, it would be easy to go even higher. If you're all about cycling, you have the budget and it's what you want to do, then I say go with God. But my advice to the OP was just ride with flat pedals for now until he gets a feel for what he wants to do and how much he wants to invest. I stand by that.
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Old 08-16-22, 04:35 AM
  #39  
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After slipping off flat pedals at on a high speed downhill with traffic giving me very little room on a road with a curb, I'm not particularly interested in not wearing clipless except on slow jaunts around the neighborhood with my family regardless of efficiency savings. For me, it's about retention leading to safety.
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Old 08-16-22, 05:38 AM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by VegasJen View Post
As I stated above, my very limited experience so far leads me to conclude there are pros and cons to both. The biggest "pro" I have noticed clipped in is the extra torque I can apply when I'm really cranking, like standing up to sprint. It's not sustainable though.

But I agree with you, I think for every day riding, the main advantage, as you said, is unloading the pedal on the upstroke. But also as you said, you can quite easily do this with flats too.

For me, the biggest "con" with clipping in is primarily the cost. Unless you're like me and buy a lot of used stuff, a new set of SPDs and good cycling shoes is going to run someone in the $200-300 range. Of course, it would be easy to go even higher. If you're all about cycling, you have the budget and it's what you want to do, then I say go with God. But my advice to the OP was just ride with flat pedals for now until he gets a feel for what he wants to do and how much he wants to invest. I stand by that.

You're right. I don't see any disadvantage to flat pedals in your use.

The reason why Simon in the GCN video was slightly less efficient with clipless was not due to the clipless fault. But the fault lies in his technique. The only way you can actually be more efficient in clipless pedal is use the same technique you would in a flat pedal. Don't pull beyond the weight of your foot on the pedals.

I've superimposed all of Terrymorse's graphs in his earlier post against the power curve I in a graph I posted earlier. As evident in the graph (blue lines), most of the participants are pulling in the upstroke (positive torque close to 270 degrees). However, most of the muscle activity in the zone highlighted in red would be wasted effort due to very minimal, almost negligible contribution to overall torque on the pedal.

To conclude clipless pedals don't make you less efficient but may encourage poor pedaling technique. Don't pull too hard!


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Old 08-16-22, 06:16 AM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by himespau View Post
After slipping off flat pedals at on a high speed downhill with traffic giving me very little room on a road with a curb, I'm not particularly interested in not wearing clipless except on slow jaunts around the neighborhood with my family regardless of efficiency savings. For me, it's about retention leading to safety.
I had scary moments hitting big bumps I didn't see on a climb while pedaling out of the saddle and felt like my feet has been lifted off the pedal by the bump. Those moments I wish I had clipless pedals.
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Old 08-16-22, 07:51 AM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by koala logs View Post
If these cyclists are recruiting their muscles in similar manner to your charts, then they're wasting a significant amount of effort from around 180 to 360 degrees of the crank angle. You'll see the pull up force they make on the upstroke is very little to matter at all and they can only pull the pedals up at low cadence (60 rpm) which is not really an efficient cadence especially for long distance riding.
Experienced cyclists recruit muscles in roughly the same way, at roughly the same point in the pedal cycle. And no, they are not "wasting effort". Almost all of the muscle effort in the 270º-360º pedal range is the quads flexing the hip, thus lifting the leg and unweighting the pedal.

A single leg is heavy (~20% of total body weight), and by lifting it the cyclist unweights the upwards moving pedal. Consider the extra effort that would be required to move the cranks if that leg was not being lifted on the upstroke.
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Old 08-16-22, 10:17 AM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by koala logs View Post
I had scary moments hitting big bumps I didn't see on a climb while pedaling out of the saddle and felt like my feet has been lifted off the pedal by the bump. Those moments I wish I had clipless pedals.
Clipless have saved my more than twice from going over the bars. Not to mention "bunny hopping" to effect to avoid obstacles.

Last edited by popeye; 08-16-22 at 10:24 AM.
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Old 08-16-22, 12:00 PM
  #44  
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Since this is turning into a clipless vs other thread, let me inject this. If you're thinking about going from flat/clips/straps to clipless, get yourself a cheap pair of shoes/pedals with flat on one side and SPD on the other. Start with one foot clipped in and the other on the flat side. Ride and practice unclipping. Switch feet. Ride some more. Keep doing this. Clip both in, or not. Keep doing this until it becomes second nature. That's all there is to it.

I found a pair of shoes at REI that had been returned because of a busted lace holder for $25 and used pedals. They were not a long term option, but worked OK enough to evaluate clipless. I got better shoes/pedals after the trial period.

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Old 08-16-22, 08:35 PM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by terrymorse View Post
Experienced cyclists recruit muscles in roughly the same way, at roughly the same point in the pedal cycle. And no, they are not "wasting effort". Almost all of the muscle effort in the 270º-360º pedal range is the quads flexing the hip, thus lifting the leg and unweighting the pedal.

A single leg is heavy (~20% of total body weight), and by lifting it the cyclist unweights the upwards moving pedal. Consider the extra effort that would be required to move the cranks if that leg was not being lifted on the upstroke.
I agree with unweighing the pedal. On a flat pedal without using any retention, my upstroke foot would briefly leave the pedal probably 5mm as I pull the leg up. I have developed auto-reflexes for it that I don't actually notice it unless I'm paying attention to it. Clipless pedals would prevent foot departures which should improve efficiency a bit. Unless you're pulling more than necessary (as Simon is probably doing in the GCN vid) which can make you slightly less efficient than using flat pedals.

Unweighing the upstroke is the key to cruising fast at high cadence with reduced muscular fatigue.
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Old 08-17-22, 01:08 PM
  #46  
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I hope my story helps as I am a long-time runner of now 42 years but there is a catch about the last 2 or 3 years not done any real serious runs. I have over 85,000 miles running in my logbooks dating back to 1985. In my peak years of running from age 29-36 I was averaging over 3000 miles a year running. I have also ridden a bike all my life but did not cycle much until about 1992 bought a road bike and road off and on. It was a way to cross train if hurting and just a break.

Now fast forward to 2008 I decided at getting close to 50 to put some time on the bike realizing running huge mileage was not going to happen due to aging. Also I have never been real fast my best 10k is 38 minutes and 3:06 marathon but respectable and I was consistent. So starting riding maybe 1500 to up to 2000 miles a year after that and dropping off running but still around 30-40 weekly miles running. Then I developed Runner's Dystonia about 10 years ago and it has progressed to I can sometimes run but very little. I can walk ok although I am not graceful, I get the job done. Runner's dystonia is not an injury and as such does not progress but in effect the brain and body has forgotten how to run. Without going into any detail just look it up and it is rare but not fatal just no real cure at all. Nothing hurts or actually causes a problem but I just cannot tandem run except once in a while things go together and I get up a stride.

So the bike and cycling has become for me a saving activity and I am so grateful to the Lord. It has no effect on my cycling and I can ride all I want and do just fine. The difference is walking I cannot get my heart rate up much as I am a long-time endurance person so conditioned. On the bike though I can get my heart rate up because I can cycle like anyone else and fast you turn the cranks the higher the HR. I have gradually worked up over the last 7-9 years cycling mileage and averaging 5000 thousand miles a year. Well I retired 4 years ago and along with COVID I have been riding now about 10,000 miles a year. I ride pretty much year around. I also became a bike mechanic and wheel builder at least for myself and some others who call on me.

So now the difference between running and cycling. I hate to break to anyone but other than the endurance aspect they are completely different. I can ride hard and long day after day without the pounding of running. If I were to go out and run a hard 8 mile run even when I was in top running shape that required, some recovery and a much different approach the next day. I could do 100 mile rides even relatively fast within days of each other. I could even do an all-out 100 for time and recover within a week. Not with running at all. An all-out marathon I could only do 2 a year. The pounding of running a marathon is nothing a bike ride will have. The only difference is a crash on the bike can be serious and even fatal. Running probably does not have the kind of risk unless something really goes wrong.

I don't race and at 61 I just enjoy being out and being active. Cycling has been so good for that and while it is not running it willl have to do. I still try and run a bit and walk especially more in winter when I use indoor trainer. I got the cycling bug and what a joy. Oh would i love to go out and run a 45 minute 5 mile run or even 55 minutes. but I cannot. However cycling has shown me things and places that running could never touch. Cycle, Run, walk, and even a swim is good. It makes the beer, pizzia and donuts taste better.

The deacon will stop preaching.
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Old 08-17-22, 03:05 PM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by deacon mark View Post
I hope my story helps as I am a long-time runner of now 42 years but there is a catch about the last 2 or 3 years not done any real serious runs. I have over 85,000 miles running in my logbooks dating back to 1985. In my peak years of running from age 29-36 I was averaging over 3000 miles a year running. I have also ridden a bike all my life but did not cycle much until about 1992 bought a road bike and road off and on. It was a way to cross train if hurting and just a break.

Now fast forward to 2008 I decided at getting close to 50 to put some time on the bike realizing running huge mileage was not going to happen due to aging. Also I have never been real fast my best 10k is 38 minutes and 3:06 marathon but respectable and I was consistent. So starting riding maybe 1500 to up to 2000 miles a year after that and dropping off running but still around 30-40 weekly miles running. Then I developed Runner's Dystonia about 10 years ago and it has progressed to I can sometimes run but very little. I can walk ok although I am not graceful, I get the job done. Runner's dystonia is not an injury and as such does not progress but in effect the brain and body has forgotten how to run. Without going into any detail just look it up and it is rare but not fatal just no real cure at all. Nothing hurts or actually causes a problem but I just cannot tandem run except once in a while things go together and I get up a stride.

So the bike and cycling has become for me a saving activity and I am so grateful to the Lord. It has no effect on my cycling and I can ride all I want and do just fine. The difference is walking I cannot get my heart rate up much as I am a long-time endurance person so conditioned. On the bike though I can get my heart rate up because I can cycle like anyone else and fast you turn the cranks the higher the HR. I have gradually worked up over the last 7-9 years cycling mileage and averaging 5000 thousand miles a year. Well I retired 4 years ago and along with COVID I have been riding now about 10,000 miles a year. I ride pretty much year around. I also became a bike mechanic and wheel builder at least for myself and some others who call on me.

So now the difference between running and cycling. I hate to break to anyone but other than the endurance aspect they are completely different. I can ride hard and long day after day without the pounding of running. If I were to go out and run a hard 8 mile run even when I was in top running shape that required, some recovery and a much different approach the next day. I could do 100 mile rides even relatively fast within days of each other. I could even do an all-out 100 for time and recover within a week. Not with running at all. An all-out marathon I could only do 2 a year. The pounding of running a marathon is nothing a bike ride will have. The only difference is a crash on the bike can be serious and even fatal. Running probably does not have the kind of risk unless something really goes wrong.

I don't race and at 61 I just enjoy being out and being active. Cycling has been so good for that and while it is not running it willl have to do. I still try and run a bit and walk especially more in winter when I use indoor trainer. I got the cycling bug and what a joy. Oh would i love to go out and run a 45 minute 5 mile run or even 55 minutes. but I cannot. However cycling has shown me things and places that running could never touch. Cycle, Run, walk, and even a swim is good. It makes the beer, pizzia and donuts taste better.

The deacon will stop preaching.
What a great post, I love it. I am a very long time cyclist going back to 1972. I was a pretty good runner when young, even did a triathlon. My children are good runners, both having done marathons, and my son even completed an Ironman triathlon. I still enjoy my first love, riding a bicycle. My best memories of my childhood were when the streets of Montreal were clear enough of snow that my parents would let us take our bikes out of winter hibernation
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Old 08-19-22, 09:03 AM
  #48  
Fredo76
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Racing was fun as hell when I was a teenager. Racers have been attaching their feet to the pedals for at least 88 years now (see the second and third photos):

https://www.welovecycling.com/wide/2...our-de-france/

They are not required to, and neither are any other cyclists. If you want to try racing, I would get used to clipless pedals, and then, get used to riding in a group, and in pace-lines with other riders. Just find a club ride with a regular meeting time and show up.

Luckily, racing and going fast are not needed to enjoy cycling!
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Old 08-19-22, 09:58 AM
  #49  
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a lot fo advise... a lot of which isn't gonna help a transition to cycling.
before getting absorbed about 'racing', get absorbed into 'riding'.
The bike
If you are able to ride the bike, even up to 24 mph, and even though it might be 'big', it's apparently not too big at the moment.
if it needs some maintenance, now's a good time to learn some of the basics yourself, along with that you'll learn more about cycling and being a rider.
get a bike maintenance book from the library - ask about maintenance issues here.
There's quite a bit to know to making sure the next bike is more suitable, for you, than the current one.
The important, permanent part of cycling
search out/find cycling groups in your area - a wealth of knowledge, much can be learned from starting to ride with others, at a comfortable pace....
Riding the bike is both simple and complex - especially as you add in varying terrain, conditions, speed, environment and others, be at other riders, traffic, other users of the paths you are using.
there's great joy to earning new things - especially for cycling - cycling with others is a great way to get on a path which might eventually come to some form of 'competition'.
if there's a cycling club in your area (or more than one) JOIN
flat pedals are very fine to start, as you progress, you'll have many opportunities to decide how and when to change that.
Learning to uses your gearing is a fundamental part of cycling, and further advancement.
Smooth pedaling serves at every level.
Good posture assures comfort and performance at every level, speed and distance - not so different in that respect from running.
Converted runners are a good source of info about 'converting' , with both dos and don'ts
Welcome to the universe of cycling
Ride On
Yuri
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Old 08-19-22, 10:00 AM
  #50  
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Getting a bike that fits is the first step. You can always change pedals, go faster if you like, and make other modifications. I wouldn't worry about speed. If you don't feel comfortable going more than 24mph, keep that as a max speed. Cycling is for pleasure, so do hat's pleasurable.
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