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Baseline fitness of active cyclists.

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Baseline fitness of active cyclists.

Old 08-24-21, 06:30 AM
  #51  
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Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
I thought the OP was interested in how far/long we can ride literally non-stop. Not how long we can ride over multiple days, which is obviously a whole different thing.
I have no idea why the OP is asking or what he is trying to ascertain, which is why I asked in one of the posts.

I have never done a single ride in my life without stopping.

My interpretation of his request was how long are your average rides. A ride is a continuous endeavor. You don't change your kit, you stop for traffic, you stop to pee, and on long rides, you stop to eat. There just are not many long stretches of road in the USA do to a long ride without any stops. Lander Wyoming to Riggins is the most remote, lonely stretch that I can recall riding, it is about 125 miles and if you don't stop at the motorist rest stop for water, you will die.
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Old 08-24-21, 07:00 AM
  #52  
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Oh so now it's how far you can go without stopping? Don't know, but my morning rides I do a little over 10 miles without stopping (except for traffic, if needed). But on my longer rides, I usually stop and take a short break after about 10 miles. I honestly don't know how far I can go without stopping, but a few weekends back I did a group ride where we rode 15 miles without a rest break. Or, I would have but a flat tire at about mile 14 caused an unscheduled rest break. I'm sure I've done longer on an organized century ride, as one of the stretches between SAG stops was probably close to 20 miles. But then I still don't know how many pushups would help me ride that far...
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Old 08-24-21, 07:14 AM
  #53  
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A good baseline fitness is important for normal everyday life, not just cycling or other sports. Especially as we age, it is wise to build / maintain strength in all areas to help prevent falls that could cause serious injury. Besides cycling, I always want to be able to run, lift heavy weights, and perform well in martial arts.

Plenty of organizations use pushups as part of a physical strength and endurance test. I found this interesting Livestrong article on the subject. Being below average in this or any other fitness area is not where I want to be.

https://www.livestrong.com/article/4...for-men-women/

The average number of push-ups adults can do varies by age range and gender. The norms provided by the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology breaks up the results into the following categories: needs improvement, fair, good, very good and excellent. Looking at the "good" category, the average number of push-ups for each age group is:
  • 15 to 19 years old: 23 to 28 push-ups for men, 18 to 24 push-ups for women
  • 20 to 29 years old: 22 to 28 push-ups for men, 15 to 20 push-ups for women
  • 30 to 39 years old: 17 to 21 push-ups for men, 13 to 19 push-ups for women
  • 40 to 49 years old: 13 to 16 push-ups for men, 11 to 14 push-ups for women
  • 50 to 59 years old: 10 to 12 push-ups for men, seven to 10 push-ups for women
  • 60 years and older: eight to 10 push-ups for men, five to 11 push-ups for women
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Old 08-24-21, 07:19 AM
  #54  
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Originally Posted by GhostRider62 View Post
I have no idea why the OP is asking or what he is trying to ascertain, which is why I asked in one of the posts.

I have never done a single ride in my life without stopping.

My interpretation of his request was how long are your average rides. A ride is a continuous endeavor. You don't change your kit, you stop for traffic, you stop to pee, and on long rides, you stop to eat. There just are not many long stretches of road in the USA do to a long ride without any stops. Lander Wyoming to Riggins is the most remote, lonely stretch that I can recall riding, it is about 125 miles and if you don't stop at the motorist rest stop for water, you will die.
Maybe it's a language thing. But over here when people say they did a non-stop ride, it means they didn't stop for anything other than momentarily for traffic and maybe a very quick water bottle fill / pee on a longer ride. I rarely stop at all on my rides, which are anything from 1-9 hours long. It's just my strategy to get the best finish time. Most people stop at the feed stations for a break, while I just go by and eat on the move. Saves a good 5-10 mins and keeps the momentum going. Quite often have some interesting leap-frog battles with guys who are riding a little faster, but stopping a few times.

Anyway 9 hours is about my tolerance for not stopping, but my average endurance rides are more like 4-5 hours. The 130 km event I did last weekend took 4.5 hours and according to Strava I stopped for less than a minute in total (due only to the accumulation of traffic junctions).
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Old 08-24-21, 08:02 AM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
Maybe it's a language thing. But over here when people say they did a non-stop ride, it means they didn't stop for anything other than momentarily for traffic and maybe a very quick water bottle fill / pee on a longer ride. I rarely stop at all on my rides, which are anything from 1-9 hours long. It's just my strategy to get the best finish time. Most people stop at the feed stations for a break, while I just go by and eat on the move. Saves a good 5-10 mins and keeps the momentum going. Quite often have some interesting leap-frog battles with guys who are riding a little faster, but stopping a few times.

Anyway 9 hours is about my tolerance for not stopping, but my average endurance rides are more like 4-5 hours. The 130 km event I did last weekend took 4.5 hours and according to Strava I stopped for less than a minute in total (due only to the accumulation of traffic junctions).

Heck, if you look at the OP, it just asks "how long is your average bike ride". I don't even know if that's average distance, time, or what. Assuming fairly level terrain and neutral wind conditions, there's a whole hell of a lot of difference in fitness required to cover 130km in 4.5 hours vs. say 50km in the same time.

Using your definition, I did a lot of non-stop 100 mile rides (6-6.5 hours, usually) last year for the simple reason that there was nowhere good to take a nice indoor break at. Quite a few of those were done without bathroom or water refill breaks, but I could only pull that off when the weather was relatively cool so the water requirements were relatively low.

I'm really not interested in riding around a closed track again and again to do 100 miles without any traffic stops--I think that's the only way that could be done around here.

Anything over 100 miles, I want a nice lunch break of an hour or so.

I don't think it's going to come as any kind of shock that cycling doesn't do much for people's upper-body "fitness". This thread has absolutely no point.
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Old 08-24-21, 09:22 AM
  #56  
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
Heck, if you look at the OP, it just asks "how long is your average bike ride".
Yeah, I was just cross-referencing his other thread about riding for 23 mins non-stop.
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Old 08-24-21, 10:32 AM
  #57  
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So, does the 5 minute average bike ride include breaks, or is it continuous?
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Old 08-24-21, 10:38 AM
  #58  
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Originally Posted by tomato coupe View Post
So, does the 5 minute average bike ride include breaks, or is it continuous?
LOL, I couldn't imagine taking a break in the middle of a 5 minute ride. But yeah, better stop if you need to, don't want to strain yourself.
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Old 08-24-21, 10:38 AM
  #59  
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Originally Posted by AlmostTrick View Post
A good baseline fitness is important for normal everyday life, not just cycling or other sports. Especially as we age, it is wise to build / maintain strength in all areas to help prevent falls that could cause serious injury. Besides cycling, I always want to be able to run, lift heavy weights, and perform well in martial arts.

Plenty of organizations use pushups as part of a physical strength and endurance test. I found this interesting Livestrong article on the subject. Being below average in this or any other fitness area is not where I want to be.

https://www.livestrong.com/article/4...for-men-women/

  • Read the other day that a good indication of adult male upper body/core fitness is the ability to do 40 push-ups with out a break. I am happy with doing 30-35.
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Old 08-24-21, 10:42 AM
  #60  
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Originally Posted by Milton Keynes View Post
LOL, I couldn't imagine taking a break in the middle of a 5 minute ride. But yeah, better stop if you need to, don't want to strain yourself.
I like to get off the bike every 2 minutes and crank out 200-250 air squats and a couple dozen pushups.
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Old 08-24-21, 10:51 AM
  #61  
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5 minute bike ride? Are you a track pursuiter?
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Old 08-24-21, 10:53 AM
  #62  
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Originally Posted by caloso View Post
5 minute bike ride? Are you a track pursuiter?
He likes to go around the block.
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Old 08-24-21, 11:11 AM
  #63  
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Now to go on the weight lifting forum & proclaim that I can do 8 bicep curls with 5 lb dumbbells.
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Old 08-24-21, 11:11 AM
  #64  
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Back to the OP's OP:

1. Clapton
2. Beck
3. Page
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Old 08-24-21, 11:33 AM
  #65  
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1. Piper At The Gates Of Dawn
2. Piper At The Gates Of Dawn
3. Piper At The Gates Of Dawn

Just joined a classic rock band on bass. Most of their songs required almost no effort to learn, although I did look on YouTube to nail down some details. But they do several Pink Floyd songs (Time, Breathe, Comfortably Numb, Wish You Were Here) that are killing me. I had to write those out.

Not because they're difficult, but because they're so similar---nearly the same chords, minimally reordered, with all of the songs performed at roughly the same funereal tempo. Luckily, YouTube allows manipulation of playback speed, so I listen to and learn those songs at 2X the original tempo, a speed at which they sound more or less normal.

Must have been tough when their resident songwriting genius, Syd Barrett, who wrote all the best songs on Piper At The Gates Of Dawn, disappeared irretrievably into a druggie haze. Imagine if Shakespeare had disappeared after Hamlet and four illiterate spear-carriers were recruited to keep the hits coming.
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Old 08-24-21, 11:42 AM
  #66  
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Originally Posted by Trakhak View Post
1. Piper At The Gates Of Dawn
2. Piper At The Gates Of Dawn
3. Piper At The Gates Of Dawn

Just joined a classic rock band on bass. Most of their songs required almost no effort to learn, although I did look on YouTube to nail down some details. But they do several Pink Floyd songs (Time, Breathe, Comfortably Numb, Wish You Were Here) that are killing me. I had to write those out.

Not because they're difficult, but because they're so similar---nearly the same chords, minimally reordered, with all of the songs performed at roughly the same funereal tempo. Luckily, YouTube allows manipulation of playback speed, so I listen to and learn those songs at 2X the original tempo, a speed at which they sound more or less normal.

Must have been tough when their resident songwriting genius, Syd Barrett, who wrote all the best songs on Piper At The Gates Of Dawn, disappeared irretrievably into a druggie haze. Imagine if Shakespeare had disappeared after Hamlet and four illiterate spear-carriers were recruited to keep the hits coming.
Yeah I'm sure you could have given Dave Gilmour a few tips on the bass lines.
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Old 08-24-21, 12:33 PM
  #67  
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Originally Posted by Milton Keynes View Post
Oh so now it's how far you can go without stopping? Don't know, but my morning rides I do a little over 10 miles without stopping (except for traffic, if needed). But on my longer rides, I usually stop and take a short break after about 10 miles. I honestly don't know how far I can go without stopping, but a few weekends back I did a group ride where we rode 15 miles without a rest break. Or, I would have but a flat tire at about mile 14 caused an unscheduled rest break. I'm sure I've done longer on an organized century ride, as one of the stretches between SAG stops was probably close to 20 miles. But then I still don't know how many pushups would help me ride that far...

I managed to ride the 112 mile segment of my 2014 IMFL as a no touch - no stop ride. Carried enough liquids and nutrition for the ride that took me 6:10:50. Could not go all out since I still had the marathon after.
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Old 08-24-21, 01:33 PM
  #68  
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Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
Yeah I'm sure you could have given Dave Gilmour a few tips on the bass lines.
I think you mean Roger Waters, since he played bass guitar and wrote many of Floyd's songs.
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Old 08-24-21, 02:05 PM
  #69  
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Originally Posted by Milton Keynes View Post
I think you mean Roger Waters, since he played bass guitar and wrote many of Floyd's songs.
Yeah good point. I was just thinking of Gilmour as being the leader, but I guess that's highly debatable! I saw Roger Waters play in Birmingham about 20 ish years ago. They played the whole Dark Side of the Moon set. He was getting on a bit by then, but still pretty cool.
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Old 08-24-21, 02:13 PM
  #70  
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Originally Posted by seypat View Post
...why is he going so fast on the air squat? It's causing his form to break down and the knee to get out in front of his foot. Not good.
bad form is one thing, but "knees over toes" may not be as "not good" as you have been trained to believe. Knees Over Toes guy on YouTube
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Old 08-24-21, 03:21 PM
  #71  
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Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
Maybe it's a language thing. But over here when people say they did a non-stop ride, it means they didn't stop for anything other than momentarily for traffic and maybe a very quick water bottle fill / pee on a longer ride. I rarely stop at all on my rides, which are anything from 1-9 hours long. It's just my strategy to get the best finish time. Most people stop at the feed stations for a break, while I just go by and eat on the move. Saves a good 5-10 mins and keeps the momentum going. Quite often have some interesting leap-frog battles with guys who are riding a little faster, but stopping a few times.

Anyway 9 hours is about my tolerance for not stopping, but my average endurance rides are more like 4-5 hours. The 130 km event I did last weekend took 4.5 hours and according to Strava I stopped for less than a minute in total (due only to the accumulation of traffic junctions).
How about.....longest ride. Does that work? The continuity of the ride is what I was trying to convey. I have no idea what OP means. Whether someone stops 1 minute or 10 minutes on a 130 mile ride, I cannot imagine any difference in the training effect or load with all other aspects equal. I watched a couple of 550 mile 24 hour efforts and even these world class athletes have to stop here and there, albeit for short periods. In the ride I references, I had no food for 447 km and when I had the chance for food, I stopped and stuff my face with food. I would not consider continuing the ride to be a new ride because it was a continuous effort. Capisce?
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Old 08-24-21, 10:13 PM
  #72  
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I'm 76 for a little context.
1) 30
2) When I was 18, I did 200 1-legged squats off each leg. Now, I dunno. I just got back from backpacking up and down 2400', up one day, down the next. I did get tired, but I'm out of shape. My legs don't feel like doing 100 squats right now. In my late 50's. I'd do sets of 30 barbell squats at 85% bodyweight.
3) Average? Why would I calculate that. I'm down to ~50 miles for a good Sunday tandem ride. My indoor roller rides are usually ~20 miles. When I was 74, I rode 154 miles & 9,000' in 10:17 moving and 11:41 elapsed. My longest day ride has been 400k.
I'm fairly typical for an experienced club rider, lots of folks faster, lots of folks slower.
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Old 08-25-21, 04:16 AM
  #73  
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Originally Posted by GhostRider62 View Post
How about.....longest ride. Does that work? The continuity of the ride is what I was trying to convey. Capisce?
Let's be honest here. What you were trying to convey is that you can do a 1200 km "non-stop" ride in response to my 160 km non-stop ride. Of course I get it.
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Old 08-25-21, 06:09 AM
  #74  
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Originally Posted by GhostRider62 View Post
First time I did a pushup in 3 years, pretty pathetic.

1. 21
2. over 100 squats (I got very bored and just stopped)
3. A little over 2 hours (one day off per week)

So, what is the point, Mr. Pin?
21 pushups with strict form is fairly impressive for someone who does not do pushups.
Looks like your leg endurance is on a whole different level than a non-biker.
How old are you?
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Old 08-25-21, 06:10 AM
  #75  
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Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
From your post above in another thread, I would suggest that your "baseline fitness" is not actually very impressive. You would easily beat me on the number of push-ups you can do, but on the bike you have a very, very long way to go. My longest non-stop ride this year was 100 miles with 13,000 ft of vertical elevation, which took around 8 hours (with only 4 mins of stopping time to re-fill bottles). Plenty of guys were considerably faster as I'm not the best climber in the world at 175 lbs. Your best effort above would not even count as a recovery spin for me or any other half reasonable cyclist.
You don't read so well, do you?

1) How many consecutive pushups can you do (without pausing at top for rest)
2) How many consecutive air squats can you do (without pausing at top for rest)
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