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Newbie building a Peugeot UO-8 - help!

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Newbie building a Peugeot UO-8 - help!

Old 09-07-22, 07:42 PM
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yonex96
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Newbie building a Peugeot UO-8 - help!

Hi everyone,

I recently rescued a lovely orange Peugeot UO-8 frame from a sidewalk trash heap, and am hoping to build it up into a commuter bike. I've realized quickly that I bit off more than I could chew and would appreciate any help/advice folks can offer. This is my first ever build, let alone with a vintage bike, and I'm a bit lost with the terminology and parts. So far I've cleaned up the rust and given it a coat of paint, and managed to get a used Miche Excite wheelset along with some fresh tires, tubes, and cables (not installed yet). My key question is: what are my next steps to make this a useable bike? I was unaware of the difference between a freewheel and cassette until today, for context, so please be kind. My understanding is that this bike originally had a 10 speed freewheel setup. Can I buy a modern cassette and install that, or do I need to buy a new freewheel? How do I know what is compatible with my current wheelset and the existing bracket/crankset? I also still have the old rear wheel, is there a way to dislodge the parts to reuse on the new wheelset? Everything seems quite fused together at the moment so I'm not sure if it's salvageable. Finally, is there anything else I should be aware of for this project? I'm hoping to keep original parts as much as possible, as well as keep costs down. Photos here (remove spaces in URL): drive.google.com/drive/folders/ 12Qfiu46oPVTT6J55Z2OHex-f4uDWlQK-?usp=sharing

Thank you in advance for your help,
Anna

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Old 09-07-22, 08:15 PM
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Link assist: https://drive.google.com/drive/folde...K-?usp=sharing

In what way do you think you've bitten off more than you can chew?

Freewheel is basically an all-in one gear unit that threads onto the rear hub. What you show for wheels is not a freewheel, there's a cassette that slides onto the splined provision on the hub. It may or may not be compatible with your setup. You need to attempt mounting both wheels on the bike to ensure they fit between the fork ends and rear dropouts, respectively. Spacing on newer wheels often isn't the same as what older frames used.

You've got good bones to work with here. The most important thing you'll need to do will be re-packing the grease in the headset and bottom bracket. To remove the crank, you'll need a cotter press. I've got a post somewhere on here about how you can upgrade to a non-cottered crank with these old Peugeots. Basically it's all about proper spindle selection, swapping the cottered spindle out for a non-cottered spindle, then selecting an appropriate cotterless crank.

OR go the easy, more expensive way, and get a proper-width French- or Swiss-thread sealed bottom bracket from VeloOrange or similar. I suspect that bike would be French thread, but it's in that potential year range (mid-late 70s) where some things were being products with Swiss threads.

Note that your lowest cost path with refurb is to keep the stock headset, stock stem, and the stock bottom bracket cups. They'll be metric, "French" threaded. There are options out there to upgrade to newer, but none are low-cost. VeloOrange has a lot of products. If you have a bicycle co-op near you, they may be able to help press-out the cotters so you can repack the bottom end, then properly press the cotters back in, if not mangled from pressing out.

The Simplex shifters, note that a lot of cables out there have lead ends that are too fat and will jam into the levers. On Amazon, the Schwinn recabling kit that costs like $12 actually fits them well, and will have everything you need to do the brakes and shifters. Search Amazon for this text: B00L8NDVD6

The Simplex derailleurs this may or may not have come with will have Delrin plastic parts with a penchant for fading and cracking. For derailleurs, it's probably best to replace them. You'll need to pick something compatible with its shifters, and that will work with whatever cassette you plan to slap on the rear hub. May be harder than it sounds. Most people will go with a vintage wheelset, and use bulletproof Suntour or Shimano/Crane front/rear mechs to tie it all together. Huret is always a good option, the 'Club' series works well.

Fortunately, it's friction shift, not index shift, so you have a lot of fudge room on how to piece it together if you have a fundamental understanding of things.

I may not be back on the forum for a few days to answer this, but hopefully it's enough to get you started. Just happened to see this sitting in the main feed and it's a topic I have a lot of direct experience with
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Old 09-07-22, 08:27 PM
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My first road bike in 1971! I think that's a big project to chew on. At least you started with a freebie.
It doesn't seem that rear wheel will work in stock form. And you're missing so many components.
In my opinion, you could spend $150 to end up with a $50 bike.
That bicycling garage sale I visited a couple weeks back would've done the trick for you.
But those are few and far between. Good luck, pal.
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Old 09-07-22, 08:51 PM
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When this bike was referred to as a ten speed... that was 5x2 to get ten.
the frame spacing was 120 mm
your wheel set is probably 130mm
the frame will need to be spread apart.
not sure what those Miche hubs were set up for. Appears Shimano in spline form but you need to reference from where purchased the cassette width ( by inference the number of cogs it can take )
700c is 4mm smaller in radius than a 27" rim...
pretty sure there is room up front to drop the pads, not sure at the rear.

if a 8, 9, 10, 11 cog cassette is required you will probably need a newer rear derailleur with more "swing" to catch the largest rear cogs.

the current front chainrings won't accept a 9 or 10 cassette- too wide. Needed chain too narrow.

this is not a plug and play project.

I would save the wheels for the next bike, use the wheels that came with, new brake pads, cables. Not sure what to advise on the derailleurs- do not know what you have.
setting aside Simplex is a rational thing to do, you might be married to those levers. As I recall one side of the shift was brazed on, the other side on a clamp, unique to Simplex.
the problem with those levers is they do not pull a lot of cable in total.
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Old 09-07-22, 08:51 PM
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In major metropolitan areas there are quite a few bike co-ops and community bike shops who can provide you with instruction and cheap parts. Give us an idea of where you are located and we might be able to point you in the right direction.
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Old 09-09-22, 09:31 AM
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Before spending a penny, carefully inspect the frame and fork set to ensure that it has not been damaged. Bent tubes often display cracks in the paint. If you see them, move on to another project...


Also, starting with just a frame set can become a pretty expensive and exasperating way to build up a vintage road bike. Take this seriously, getting it all can cost a lot, a lot more than just finding a complete bike that needs a bit of this and that. Also, make sure the bike will fit you. My first build was a great looking bike that turned out to be too big for me (look at the length of the head tube as an initial reference point) with a frame set that was bent. This Sekine that I painted over was way too big for me...


This Torpado is just my size but, obviously, too big for my grandson...


And what I can do now...
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Old 09-09-22, 10:13 AM
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Nothing wrong with an AO-8/UO-8 that Japanese derailleurs and aluminum rims and crankset can't fix. According to the serial number, mine frame is a 1970.

My UO-8 with barcon cables routed between the rack and the cylindrical Bellwether front bag.
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Old 09-09-22, 12:12 PM
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Orange UO-8 bikes aren't commonly seen, so it was disappointing to then read "...gave it a coat of paint... ."
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Old 09-09-22, 01:10 PM
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...I totally understand why you might have adopted this poor bike, seeing it cast aside and unloved on a trash heap. I would only point out to you that from a purely economic standpoint, this is usually the most expensive way to acquire a commuter bicycle. There are plenty of likely candidates going begging, at very low prices, on most (if not all) local Craigslist and FAcebook marketplace lists, that already have all the parts on them, that will be easier to service than your old Peugeot, (because of its unique French standards for tubing diameters and threading). All of them will turn out cheaper and possibly better long term prospects for a commuter bike, and will be more easily maintained after you put them right.

What you are proposing as your project here is not impossible. It's just the single most confusing and expensive way to go about it, given your personal level of mechanical expertise at this point. I doubt anything I've said here will disabuse you of your idea, now that you have painted it. But I felt it needed to be said. Best of luck.
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Old 09-09-22, 09:49 PM
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Welcome, and thanks for saving this bike! You have chosen a path that should yield a nice riding bike with a little investment and some good old sweat equity, if you are willing.

If you have the original rear wheel already, I would just use that for now, until you learn a little bit more about cold setting the rear for a wider rear hub, and using a claw adapter for a non-original derailleur. Best to build up to that knowledge in time. Head over to a local bike co-op and be honest with them - tell them you saved this from the trash and you are just trying to get it rideable on the cheap. Hopefully they will empathize with you and help in finding you some parts that will work with your new ride.

This doesn't have to be super expensive! If you use the new front wheel, and keep the original rear wheel (for now), then it looks like you are mainly looking at consumables - things like a new chain (KMC X8 is a good chain and <$15), bar tape, etc. You can get a cable kit from walmart for like $10 (https://www.walmart.com/ip/Bell-Pit-...0?athbdg=L1300) just to get you on the road. I'd recommend also getting new brake pads as old ones get hard/brittle and don't stop as well (something basic like - https://www.walmart.com/ip/4-Pair-Bi...Tire/826124949). Looks like you'll need a seatpost and a seat and maybe a binder bolt as well, but those are all things that a bike co-op would have.

Chain - $15
Cable kit - $11 (bell kit from walmart)
Seatpost - $5? (I just got a seatpost from a co-op literally today for $5)
Seat - $5-10?
Handlebar tape: $6 (check ebay)
Brake pads: $10

So for about $50-$60 you can get this thing back on the road. When you get a rescue animal, there is always an adoption fee

Once you learn how to do a cold set and get the right cassette, you can upgrade the rear wheel and derailleur at the same time, but you can work your way up to that. Good luck!




I know everyone is recommending you take the whole thing apart and regrease everything, but you just saved this from the dump, so worst case scenario you burn out some bearing races on some beat up old parts and upgrade down the road. I say learn as you go.
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Old 09-09-22, 11:49 PM
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Originally Posted by yonex96 View Post
...So far I've cleaned up the rust and given it a coat of paint...
Just think of all you have learned just doing the basics. Fun. FUN FUN...

Skip that talk of doing a Classic Vintage Restoration. There is nothing wrong with economical modern day components. I have a UO-8 Mixti I am gathering parts for. It is not going to be a restoration. It will be Frankenized for the type of bike I ride. I have been slowly gathering all the components needed for when I launch my build. I'll give you and example of what I have sitting in a wooden box beneath the bike. Almost all of the components are salvaged...

Wheel Set RM19 Rims 27 1-1/4 with hubs all cleaned up and trued
I will use Continental Ride Tour 27 1-1/4 tires
Rebuilt Shimano Tourney MF-TZ30 14-34T Freewheel
SRAM PC-830 6/7/8-Speed Road
Simplex quick releases and skewers
New Tektro R369 Brake Set
5SB Crank Spindle (hard to find but allows conversion to a tapered crank possible)
Cleaned up Origin8 Classic Sport Road Double Crankset - 170 x 52/42 Square Taper Silver
SunRace Bicycle Index Hanger Derailleur Adapter (I will weld this on)
I have a classic Suntour long cage rear derailleur but you should consider a BATULLO RD-TZ31-A 6/7
New Kalloy 26mm seat post filed down, sanded, and polished to about 25.3mm (UO-8 Posts vary in size)
I'll reuse my Simplex front derailleur as it is still in good condition
Same thing for the Simplex stem shifters
Yes... I am going to keep the head set and Suicide ATX stem (polished up)
Of course I use bull horn handle bars
Tektro Bar end reverse Brake levers
I might use a Bikearoo Womens Saddle
I haven't figured out yet how I'll mount a water bottle

OK... That's my UO-8 Mixti. Just gathering parts and I have not even stripped the frame yet... Yes... fun Fun FUN...

Many think building up and old bike is a waste of time and money, but man, I get just as much fun out of my tinkering as I do ridding, and to be able to ride your tinker is great even though the cost may exceed a Wallmart Special.

Can't drink... Can't smoke... What do I do???
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Old 09-10-22, 12:07 AM
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Library is your friend

One suggestion is for you to check your local library for a period appropriate bicycle maintenance manual. The chapters and illustrations will help you to get the nomenclature down and help you get to a better understanding of what you are up against. Get an old book from the seventies so that it’s issuance is contemporary with the age of the bike. Home has many of the brochures by year so you can find your bike and see how it looked and was equipped when issued. Good luck! You are taking up a challenging but rewarding project. Take your time and don’t make it a frustrating chore.

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Old 09-10-22, 02:43 PM
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Originally Posted by zandoval View Post
OK... That's my UO-8 Mixti.
That would be a UO-18. Those were very popular in the day. I worked at a Peugeot/Nishiki dealership in the early 1970s, and we had a lot of trouble keeping those in stock because of high demand.

Originally Posted by zandoval View Post
Can't drink... Can't smoke... What do I do???
I have never done either and never missed it.
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Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
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Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
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Old 09-12-22, 09:15 AM
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Originally Posted by zandoval View Post
Can't drink... Can't smoke... What do I do???
Originally Posted by John E View Post
I have never done either and never missed it.
Subtle innuendos follow, must be something inside.
(The reference wasn't lost on me, @zandoval )


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Old 09-12-22, 07:47 PM
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Hello everyone,

Thank you so much for all of your comments and advice, I'm overwhelmed by how much help I've been offered! Thank you!! How wonderful to have a space like this to discuss. After some thought, I've decided that I want to go through with building this bike, even if it doesn't really make financial sense. Thank you to everyone who has told me the realities of the project and what it would entail. For years now I've been working on developing woodworking and general handyman skills as I was never taught them as a young woman, and would very much like to expand my skillset into basic bike mechanics, so in my situation I think the learning opportunity alone is worth the cost for me. So, here we go!! I will try to address all the key points made in previous posts below:

- I have tried the wheels and thankfully they fit! I would like to use these wheels unless it's completely impossible to make them work.
- The process to upgrade the cottered crank seems a bit complicated - can I get by with keeping the existing one, given that this will just be a occassional commuter bike? I will reach out to nearby co-ops if the community agrees that the cotter crank replacement is a non-negotiable step.
-The bike did come with the original Simplex derailleur, however it was in awful shape, the thickest layer of rust I've ever seen. I have cleaned it up since but I'm not sure if it's useable, especially since the plastic wheels have lost some spokes (cracked off completely).
- The Miche wheelset takes 9 and 10 speed Shimano cassettes, but my understanding is that I can use lower cassettes if I use spacers. Is that correct? Is there a limit to how many spacers I should use? I would like to mimic the original 5x2 setup but am having trouble finding the spacers/small cassette required for this. I also believe that an SRAM cassette would fit, but am not entirely sure.
-I do love the Simplex levers, and want to keep them at all costs!!
- I'm located in east end Toronto, a couple places mentioned to me have been BikeSauce and Bike Pirates. I'm hoping to put together as much as I can myself before I get stuck, at which point I'll wheel it in for help.
- Happy to report no paint cracks or other signs of major damage to the frame! And yes, the original guides recommend 5'4-5'9, and being 5'7 it should be a perfect fit.
- Sorry to disappoint by saying I painted it over! Unfortunately the original paint was only covering about 30% of the frame when I found it, and I couldn't afford a full sandblast and enamel repainting. I tried my best to match the original shade with what I could access.
- AdventureManCO I will certainly look into everything you mentioned, especially the 5$ bike post - my local shop quoted me $100... Otherwise yes, I will definitely need some fresh pads and and tape, I already have a seat and chain lying around I can use.
-I think this will be a Franken-bike for sure, and I agree that figuring out the pieces fitting together is the best part! Although frustrating, I have found the process thus far quite rewarding as well.
- Sactown_Albert Thank you for the link, much appreciated! I will look into it.


And now, some questions for you all!!

-Is it fundamentally ok to completely switch the rear setup from freewheel to cassette? What are the main things I should be wary of with such a switch?

-I'm of a mind to replace the old/broken Simplex derailleur. What would you recommend given that the wheel freehub is for a 10-speed cassette that I am hoping to bring down to a 5 or 6-speed with spacers? Is that even doable? Any recommendations on where I could find such a thing?

- Something I haven't mentioned before is that the old kickstand is locked solid on this frame with rust, I've tried everything under the sun to remove it. My last choice is to use an angle grinder, but I'm nervous given the closeness to the frame. Does anyone have any last-ditch recommendations before I try this approach?



Thank you all very much for helping this newcomer! You've really made my day!
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Old 09-13-22, 12:14 PM
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Originally Posted by yonex96 View Post
Hello everyone,

Thank you so much for all of your comments and advice, I'm overwhelmed by how much help I've been offered! Thank you!! How wonderful to have a space like this to discuss. After some thought, I've decided that I want to go through with building this bike, even if it doesn't really make financial sense. Thank you to everyone who has told me the realities of the project and what it would entail. For years now I've been working on developing woodworking and general handyman skills as I was never taught them as a young woman, and would very much like to expand my skillset into basic bike mechanics, so in my situation I think the learning opportunity alone is worth the cost for me. So, here we go!! I will try to address all the key points made in previous posts below:

- I have tried the wheels and thankfully they fit! I would like to use these wheels unless it's completely impossible to make them work.
- The process to upgrade the cottered crank seems a bit complicated - can I get by with keeping the existing one, given that this will just be a occassional commuter bike? I will reach out to nearby co-ops if the community agrees that the cotter crank replacement is a non-negotiable step.
-The bike did come with the original Simplex derailleur, however it was in awful shape, the thickest layer of rust I've ever seen. I have cleaned it up since but I'm not sure if it's useable, especially since the plastic wheels have lost some spokes (cracked off completely).
- The Miche wheelset takes 9 and 10 speed Shimano cassettes, but my understanding is that I can use lower cassettes if I use spacers. Is that correct? Is there a limit to how many spacers I should use? I would like to mimic the original 5x2 setup but am having trouble finding the spacers/small cassette required for this. I also believe that an SRAM cassette would fit, but am not entirely sure.
-I do love the Simplex levers, and want to keep them at all costs!!
- I'm located in east end Toronto, a couple places mentioned to me have been BikeSauce and Bike Pirates. I'm hoping to put together as much as I can myself before I get stuck, at which point I'll wheel it in for help.
- Happy to report no paint cracks or other signs of major damage to the frame! And yes, the original guides recommend 5'4-5'9, and being 5'7 it should be a perfect fit.
- Sorry to disappoint by saying I painted it over! Unfortunately the original paint was only covering about 30% of the frame when I found it, and I couldn't afford a full sandblast and enamel repainting. I tried my best to match the original shade with what I could access.
- AdventureManCO I will certainly look into everything you mentioned, especially the 5$ bike post - my local shop quoted me $100... Otherwise yes, I will definitely need some fresh pads and and tape, I already have a seat and chain lying around I can use.
-I think this will be a Franken-bike for sure, and I agree that figuring out the pieces fitting together is the best part! Although frustrating, I have found the process thus far quite rewarding as well.
- Sactown_Albert Thank you for the link, much appreciated! I will look into it.


And now, some questions for you all!!

-Is it fundamentally ok to completely switch the rear setup from freewheel to cassette? What are the main things I should be wary of with such a switch?

-I'm of a mind to replace the old/broken Simplex derailleur. What would you recommend given that the wheel freehub is for a 10-speed cassette that I am hoping to bring down to a 5 or 6-speed with spacers? Is that even doable? Any recommendations on where I could find such a thing?

- Something I haven't mentioned before is that the old kickstand is locked solid on this frame with rust, I've tried everything under the sun to remove it. My last choice is to use an angle grinder, but I'm nervous given the closeness to the frame. Does anyone have any last-ditch recommendations before I try this approach?



Thank you all very much for helping this newcomer! You've really made my day!
Too bad the east end of Toronto was so far from Port Dover ON. I have a lovely set of original wheels and a bar and stem for a 74 vintage Peugeot. I also have two project bikes in the lineup for rebuild. Last winter I did a 1977 UK spec tourer for the CEO or SIR restaurant group. I also have a 1986 made in Canada U08 mixte waiting for some love.

The 73 vintage Peugeot awaiting rebuild. Someone installed stem shifters on it, Simplex is cracked but I have a complete period Huret to install. Paint and decals are excellent.

This 1977 hangs on the wall of SIR ready to ride once whenever the original owner wants.
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