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Paint gun / airbrush Iwata HP-TH2

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Paint gun / airbrush Iwata HP-TH2

Old 02-19-21, 12:21 PM
  #1  
Mulo
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Paint gun / airbrush Iwata HP-TH2

Hi guys,


My question is a bit specific!

Here is the deal, I couldn't decide between painting my frames with an airbrush or a mini spray gun. I was about to start with a mini spray gun + full size for primer when I found out a tool between mini spray gun and airbrush exists: the Iwata HP-TH2.

So I let it here as a bottle in the sea. Maybe someone used it, any feedback will be much appreciated ! And if you don't but have relevant suggestions don't hesitate !


I read most discussions on spray guns on the forum already. Please spare me comments I saw so much like "dude easier bringing it to a pro painter", "don't do it's too complicated"... Yeah I know I'm gonna **** up a lot of paint job along the way but it might be the best way to go about it. Just want to have the fun to do it myself.


Cheers
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Old 02-19-21, 04:20 PM
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I haven't seen anything saying to bring it to a pro painter in this subforum, must have been old.

That Iwata looks nice, but maybe a little small. I couldn't really tell how fast it could deliver paint. But having something that could function similarly to an airbrush might be nice.
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Old 02-19-21, 07:04 PM
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Can't see any info on the tip size. You need something with a 1.0 tip size in order to spray automotive type urethanes. Some may say 1.0 is too small even. And for spraying many primers an even larger tip is recommended.
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Old 02-19-21, 10:30 PM
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The value of an airbrush is mostly confined to painting within masking areas. The Iwata model you reference has either a .5 or .6mm spray nozzle. That is way too small for me. I like on average a 1.3mm nozzle. And shooting some primers I prefer 1.4. You want to have enough paint output so that the little droplets flow out smooth. If you are using a smaller nozzle and apply less paint per pass, the surface of the paint starts to harden and the paint doesn't flow out smooth. That's bad. I have a touch up Sata with a 1.0 nozzle and never use it for regular frame painting because I can't get out enough paint through the nozzle for a decent flow out. I use it occasionally for panels or spraying within a masked area.

By far my favorite guns are the Iwata W-300 or LPH-300. They are a midsized gun with a very comfortable feel in my hand and atomize the paint very well. I chose the 1.3 nozzle size. I'm afraid Iwata may no longer make them. The 400 series are way too big for me. I'm not painting cars, or locomotives or large airplanes.

My primer gun is made by 3M. I like it for several reasons starting with the nozzles are make out of plastic and and are designed to be replaced when they get dirty. They aren't that expensive. Primer paint is hard to clean in a gun and over time starts to accumulate. I also love that most of the gun is made out of plastic and, as a result, very light weight. And various size nozzles can be used on the same gun with the same needle. For primers I often use the 1.4. For urethane colors and intermediate clears, I like 1.3. for runny base coats the 1.2. The different nozzle sizes are easy to swap out.
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Old 02-20-21, 09:39 AM
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Here is some general painting advice. Painting is mostly a lot of prep work compared to the time in the spray booth. It should be called sanding rather than painting. Liquid paint is really expensive. I spend hundreds each time I go to the supplier. I like to use House of Kolor paints because they have a great line of special effects paint. They also have great primers that come in the primary colors (red, blue and yellow + black and white). Getting the undercoats close in color to the top coats keeps chips looking so obvious. And the primers work as sealers too. A sealer is sprayed over a primer to make a uniform undercoat color (most paints have some translucence so you can see sand throughs or spot putty places). If timed right they can insure greater paint adherence between coats. In addition the right undercoat sealer coat can make the top color "pop" better.

There are 3 main problems you need to avoid when painting. 1st is getting the paint to flow out properly. Like I said in my first post, you gun nozzle has to be big enough that sufficient enough paint goes on to overcome the paints tendency to stay in balled up in droplets before its skin starts to harden creating a rough surface. Related to that is #2 overspray. This is when you are painting an area next to an area where the paint has allowed to set for a few minutes (or more). The side mist doesn't flow out on the old paint and makes it look dull. This problem is solved 3 ways with the pattern you use (BB to chain stays to dropouts etc) and how you hold your frame. Also it is important that you are not clumsy starting and stopping your spray pattern.

The 3rd problem is orange peel - a wavy rough paint surface. Lots of things can cause this like the reducer evaporates too fast, you don't have a big enough nozzle to get enough paint on to flow out, you spray with the wrong pressure.
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Old 02-23-21, 12:06 PM
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Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
I haven't seen anything saying to bring it to a pro painter in this subforum, must have been old.

That Iwata looks nice, but maybe a little small. I couldn't really tell how fast it could deliver paint. But having something that could function similarly to an airbrush might be nice.
Well, from most of what I've seen on the forum, what emerges from the opinions is to spray frames with mini spray guns with a 1.0 nozzle or a full size 1.3. The HP TH2 comes with a 0.6 than can be upgraded to a 0.8 so you're right, it may be too small. It could be a good idea in some cases, but considering the price I should start with a more versatile option. Plus the HP TH2 cost actually roughly as much as the LPH400 that most recommend... It's just that I don't know if it worth it as a beginner to spend that much on top tools even if I can afford it. Sometime it's just better to start with middling tools until understanding their limits. It may not apply in the case of spray guns if you actually have to be a very good painter to spray with bad guns. Would the Devilbiss StartingLine be a good option ?

Last edited by Mulo; 02-23-21 at 12:33 PM.
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Old 02-23-21, 12:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Nessism View Post
Can't see any info on the tip size. You need something with a 1.0 tip size in order to spray automotive type urethanes. Some may say 1.0 is too small even. And for spraying many primers an even larger tip is recommended.
The HP TH2 comes with a 0.6 that can be upgraded to a 0.8. Probably too small...
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Old 02-23-21, 12:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Doug Fattic View Post
The value of an airbrush is mostly confined to painting within masking areas. The Iwata model you reference has either a .5 or .6mm spray nozzle. That is way too small for me. I like on average a 1.3mm nozzle. And shooting some primers I prefer 1.4. You want to have enough paint output so that the little droplets flow out smooth. If you are using a smaller nozzle and apply less paint per pass, the surface of the paint starts to harden and the paint doesn't flow out smooth. That's bad. I have a touch up Sata with a 1.0 nozzle and never use it for regular frame painting because I can't get out enough paint through the nozzle for a decent flow out. I use it occasionally for panels or spraying within a masked area.

By far my favorite guns are the Iwata W-300 or LPH-300. They are a midsized gun with a very comfortable feel in my hand and atomize the paint very well. I chose the 1.3 nozzle size. I'm afraid Iwata may no longer make them. The 400 series are way too big for me. I'm not painting cars, or locomotives or large airplanes.

My primer gun is made by 3M. I like it for several reasons starting with the nozzles are make out of plastic and and are designed to be replaced when they get dirty. They aren't that expensive. Primer paint is hard to clean in a gun and over time starts to accumulate. I also love that most of the gun is made out of plastic and, as a result, very light weight. And various size nozzles can be used on the same gun with the same needle. For primers I often use the 1.4. For urethane colors and intermediate clears, I like 1.3. for runny base coats the 1.2. The different nozzle sizes are easy to swap out.
Thanks a lot for you exhaustivity. I was thinking in a mini spray gun with 1.0 nozzle because the surface of the bike frame is quite small. I thought painters that use full size 1.3-1.4 gun, do it because they were from the automotive industry and are more used to it. But I understood your point, the problem is not the size of the surface but the smooth flow of droplets for a qualitative paint. So your opinion is that I shoudn't start with a mini spray gun right ?
Thanks a lot for your recommendation on guns ! I made some research on W vs LPH it seems the W is compliant, the LPH is LVLP but I couldn't really figure out what difference it makes on painting. What is your opinion between the W and LPH (I've got big enough compressor for both already)? So the difference between 300 and 400 is the size, a lot of painters recommend the LPH 400, so going on a 300 is better in your opinion for bicycle frames right ?

Originally Posted by Doug Fattic View Post
Here is some general painting advice. Painting is mostly a lot of prep work compared to the time in the spray booth. It should be called sanding rather than painting. Liquid paint is really expensive. I spend hundreds each time I go to the supplier. I like to use House of Kolor paints because they have a great line of special effects paint. They also have great primers that come in the primary colors (red, blue and yellow + black and white). Getting the undercoats close in color to the top coats keeps chips looking so obvious. And the primers work as sealers too. A sealer is sprayed over a primer to make a uniform undercoat color (most paints have some translucence so you can see sand throughs or spot putty places). If timed right they can insure greater paint adherence between coats. In addition the right undercoat sealer coat can make the top color "pop" better.

There are 3 main problems you need to avoid when painting. 1st is getting the paint to flow out properly. Like I said in my first post, you gun nozzle has to be big enough that sufficient enough paint goes on to overcome the paints tendency to stay in balled up in droplets before its skin starts to harden creating a rough surface. Related to that is #2 overspray. This is when you are painting an area next to an area where the paint has allowed to set for a few minutes (or more). The side mist doesn't flow out on the old paint and makes it look dull. This problem is solved 3 ways with the pattern you use (BB to chain stays to dropouts etc) and how you hold your frame. Also it is important that you are not clumsy starting and stopping your spray pattern.

The 3rd problem is orange peel - a wavy rough paint surface. Lots of things can cause this like the reducer evaporates too fast, you don't have a big enough nozzle to get enough paint on to flow out, you spray with the wrong pressure.
Thnks a lot fot that! I'm keeping all of that in mind for when I'll start spraying. I'm already separating some old car parts to exercize !
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Old 02-23-21, 01:09 PM
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All of my pro bike frame painting colleagues have at least 3 guns. A primer gun, a color gun and a clear coat gun. And if they are doing any masking graphics, an airbrush. They all aren't necessary but there are advantages to having separate guns. Since your 1st post I've gone back to study what is new in spraying equipment. Getting a 3M Accuspray gun makes a lot of sense as a starter gun for several reasons. 1st it is made mostly of plastic and is very light. Painting more than brazing requires precise/accurate motion. Anything that distracts from that makes the job harder or worse. I like a light spray gun just like I like a light brazing torch and hoses. The more inexperienced you are, the more important the quality and lightness of your equipment. I'm sure I can do a decent enough job with guns from Harbor Freight. But I think that is money poorly spent and not saved. I want the best equipment to get the best results. I also use light hose and aluminum quick release hose fittings for the same reason.

2nd, the 3M Accuspray gun can change front nozzles sizes without changing the needle so you can choose 6 different sizes from 1.1 to 2.0. This allows you to change the nozzle size to the viscosity of the paint you are using. As a beginner this allows you to experiment with different size nozzles to help figure out what best works for you.

3rd, the nozzles are disposable and that makes this gun especially attractive for spraying primer. Primer is tenacious and wants to stick to everything and difficult to clean. Every time you clean your gun a little paint probably still remains. This builds up after awhile and causes problems. For 4 or 5 bucks I can put on a new nozzle and its like a brand new gun. I've spent a great deal of time cleaning my Iwatas and they still aren't perfectly clean. It is possible that the Accuspray is all the gun you need but if you decide to get something more expensive it will turn into your primer gun - which it is especially designed to do.

4th, it can also be your clear coat gun by switching out Nozzles when you want to spray clear. The reason we like a clear coat gun is so the clears are not contaminated by any residue from previous applications.

By the way 3M has come out with a more expensive version called the Performance. I'm going to have to investigate! I might want one.
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Old 02-23-21, 03:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Mulo View Post
Thanks a lot for you exhaustivity. I was thinking in a mini spray gun with 1.0 nozzle because the surface of the bike frame is quite small. I thought painters that use full size 1.3-1.4 gun, do it because they were from the automotive industry and are more used to it. But I understood your point, the problem is not the size of the surface but the smooth flow of droplets for a qualitative paint. So your opinion is that I shoudn't start with a mini spray gun right ?

Thanks a lot for your recommendation on guns ! I made some research on W vs LPH it seems the W is compliant, the LPH is LVLP but I couldn't really figure out what difference it makes on painting. What is your opinion between the W and LPH (I've got big enough compressor for both already)? So the difference between 300 and 400 is the size, a lot of painters recommend the LPH 400, so going on a 300 is better in your opinion for bicycle frames right ?
Yes, my Iwata 300s are semi-mini guns. They just have regular size nozzles. They are certainly smaller than regular size guns and make it easier to get into the triangles. You also want a small cup. Mine are 150ml. They are also bigger than my Sata Mini-Jet (which only has room for one finger on the trigger - I like 2). They just seem like the perfect size for painting frames. They are more comfortable in my hand than a full sized gun.

I prefer the W to the LPH. It is less complaint but sprays better. Painters that have been around awhile know that HVLP guns don't spray as well as older versions. For example I kept using a non HVLP Sata Jet 90 as my clear coat gun because it put on clear coats better. However it is a full sized gun (somewhat uncomfortable in my hand) and I really like my smaller W-300s and I don't notice spray difference between it and my W-300. Because painting a frame uses so little paint, I don't think it much matters environmentally which gun I am using. I also spray at a higher pressure than recommended because it flows out the paint better.

While I think about it, a diaphragm air pressure regulator on the gun has better pressure control than the needle type. When I 1st pull the trigger, it doesn't have a little burst of paint like a needle regulator can have. The Iwatas are better than other brands. I also use disposable air filters where the hose attaches to the gun.

You understood me that the kind of primers and clear coats we use for painting bicycle frames, a bigger nozzle (1.3 + -) is needed to flow out the paint properly. There was a guy that used my shop and a 1.0 Sata to paint his frames. He could never get the smoothness that I could with my bigger nozzles. Like most framebuilders that have an independent mind, I couldn't persuade him to change but it is just an example of why a bigger nozzle is better. Smaller nozzles can work fine on the middle color coats (if using a base coat/clear coat system). That kind of paint is thin and goes on very thin so it isn't necessary to put out enough volume of paint so it flows out like a primer or catalyzed clear needs to do.

Today's paint jobs almost always require painting in and around masks. An airbrush with a small nozzle is almost a necessity so there isn't excessive paint build up on the edges of the mask. This is where a Iwata HP-TH2 would be perfect because it has a trigger similar to the other paint guns you will be using. It wouldn't be a mistake to get one unless you find you don't like/want to paint anymore.

Getting the right paint spraying equipment is a necessity if you want to do a good job. Its like if you had a friend that asked your advice about getting into bicycling and wonders about getting something cheap until he is sure he wants to do it for sure. You can finish the rest of my example yourself. However buying a 3m Accurspray for around $200 will be good enough to get you started and be the basis for figuring out what else you might need.
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Old 02-24-21, 10:46 AM
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I use a 1.0 tip Sata Minijet for most of my painting these days. It works fine for base coats and (thinnish) 2.1 VOC clears, which are the standard in my neck of the woods (you can't buy the thicker stuff.) The tip is a little small for thicker paints but I get by.

A quick check on ebay shows you can get a new W-300 from Japan for about $200. That's a deal in my view for a brand new gun of that quality. I'm tempted...
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Old 02-24-21, 02:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Doug Fattic View Post
Yes, my Iwata 300s are semi-mini guns. They just have regular size nozzles. They are certainly smaller than regular size guns and make it easier to get into the triangles. You also want a small cup. Mine are 150ml. They are also bigger than my Sata Mini-Jet (which only has room for one finger on the trigger - I like 2). They just seem like the perfect size for painting frames. They are more comfortable in my hand than a full sized gun.

I prefer the W to the LPH. It is less complaint but sprays better. Painters that have been around awhile know that HVLP guns don't spray as well as older versions. For example I kept using a non HVLP Sata Jet 90 as my clear coat gun because it put on clear coats better. However it is a full sized gun (somewhat uncomfortable in my hand) and I really like my smaller W-300s and I don't notice spray difference between it and my W-300. Because painting a frame uses so little paint, I don't think it much matters environmentally which gun I am using. I also spray at a higher pressure than recommended because it flows out the paint better.

While I think about it, a diaphragm air pressure regulator on the gun has better pressure control than the needle type. When I 1st pull the trigger, it doesn't have a little burst of paint like a needle regulator can have. The Iwatas are better than other brands. I also use disposable air filters where the hose attaches to the gun.

You understood me that the kind of primers and clear coats we use for painting bicycle frames, a bigger nozzle (1.3 + -) is needed to flow out the paint properly. There was a guy that used my shop and a 1.0 Sata to paint his frames. He could never get the smoothness that I could with my bigger nozzles. Like most framebuilders that have an independent mind, I couldn't persuade him to change but it is just an example of why a bigger nozzle is better. Smaller nozzles can work fine on the middle color coats (if using a base coat/clear coat system). That kind of paint is thin and goes on very thin so it isn't necessary to put out enough volume of paint so it flows out like a primer or catalyzed clear needs to do.

Today's paint jobs almost always require painting in and around masks. An airbrush with a small nozzle is almost a necessity so there isn't excessive paint build up on the edges of the mask. This is where a Iwata HP-TH2 would be perfect because it has a trigger similar to the other paint guns you will be using. It wouldn't be a mistake to get one unless you find you don't like/want to paint anymore.

Getting the right paint spraying equipment is a necessity if you want to do a good job. Its like if you had a friend that asked your advice about getting into bicycling and wonders about getting something cheap until he is sure he wants to do it for sure. You can finish the rest of my example yourself. However buying a 3m Accurspray for around $200 will be good enough to get you started and be the basis for figuring out what else you might need.
Thanks again gor your insights! From what I've seen on the web it seems indeed that most prefer LVLP but there might be a misunderstanding on denomination: are you sure the W is LVLP ? On the 400 full size gun, the LPH400 is LVLP (I checked on Iwata docs, plus it is in general the most recommended gun) and the W is compliant. The docs doesn't say if the W300 is LVLP, it may be due to the fact that it is consider as gun for small paint jobs but I confess I got confused with the 400 LPH/W (LVLP/HVLP) denominations.
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Old 02-24-21, 03:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Mulo View Post
Thanks again gor your insights! From what I've seen on the web it seems indeed that most prefer LVLP but there might be a misunderstanding on denomination: are you sure the W is LVLP ? On the 400 full size gun, the LPH400 is LVLP (I checked on Iwata docs, plus it is in general the most recommended gun) and the W is compliant. The docs doesn't say if the W300 is LVLP, it may be due to the fact that it is consider as gun for small paint jobs but I confess I got confused with the 400 LPH/W (LVLP/HVLP) denominations.
I don't think my W-300 is either HVLP OR LVLP but I don't know what it is for sure. I think I read long ago that it was designed to provide a good atomizing spray but as a result could not be designated a HVLP. My LHP-300 is an HVLP gun. They are the same except for the nozzle. And I don't know that my W-300 bought many years ago is the still exactly the same as one you can buy today. What I vaguely remember is that the W-300 has the same old spray technology as what was used before HVLP became available.

Here is a picture of my W-300 and my 3M Accuspray. The orange nozzle tells me I have the 1.4 tip on to do primers. I've got the 3M disposable cup on the W-300 for when I do clears. On my other Iwatas I use their aluminum 150 ml cup. I've mentioned that a pro likes to have several guns however just one W-300 with a 1.3 tip cleaned thoroughly each time will work just fine. I definitely like how the W-300 feels better in my hand but neither do I mind the Accurspray
.
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Old 02-26-21, 02:58 PM
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Ok guys I'm about to buy the W300, the offers from Japan at $200 are tempting.
Just need to clear some doubts:
  • Hoze connection: Japan hozes are the same, is any adapter required ?
  • Air controller: should I buy the Iwata (+$50) or any air controller will do the job ?
  • Cup: I see you use 3M cups with adapter, the Iwata original cup (+$40) is not necessary right ?
  • Filters: I suppose I just can buy any in a retailer closeby
Anything else I may forget ? I'm a french leaving in Brazil. You can't find these stuff here unless paying 2-3x the price IF there are available -the W300 isn't and I'd get a headache if I ever try to import it here. So I'll have everything delivered to France and wait until someone comes to visit me, but with the pandemic... you get the picture! That's why I really can't forget anything! 3M stuff are quite available over here, and industrial standards are generally US or EU. I've got no idea if there are any difference between US and EU in spray guns but if japanese spray guns standards are the same as the US I'll just check if they use the same here.

AH! so I'll use this gun for base and clear, for primer I was thinking buying a Devilbiss StartingLine (there are made here and aren't so expensive). They're not amazing but I'll still get Devilbiss quality. Bad choice ? any gun will do the job ?

Thanks a lot for your advices anyways ! Can't wait to see my paint runing, orange peeling etc hahaha!
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Old 02-26-21, 06:45 PM
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Most pneumatic equipment lines use pipe thread, which is a U.S. standard tapered thread, but commonly found elsewhere. I assume that it's available in Brazil. I don't know if Japanese companies are more likely to use BSP, which is British. I imagine you should be able to find adapters.

I guess I would check what is available there before ordering since it would probably be easier to get what you need from the same vendor.
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Old 02-26-21, 09:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Mulo View Post
Ok guys I'm about to buy the W300, the offers from Japan at $200 are tempting.
Just need to clear some doubts:
  • Hoze connection: Japan hozes are the same, is any adapter required ?
  • Air controller: should I buy the Iwata (+$50) or any air controller will do the job ?
  • Cup: I see you use 3M cups with adapter, the Iwata original cup (+$40) is not necessary right ?
  • Filters: I suppose I just can buy any in a retailer closeby
Anything else I may forget ? I'm a french leaving in Brazil. You can't find these stuff here unless paying 2-3x the price IF there are available -the W300 isn't and I'd get a headache if I ever try to import it here. So I'll have everything delivered to France and wait until someone comes to visit me, but with the pandemic... you get the picture! That's why I really can't forget anything! 3M stuff are quite available over here, and industrial standards are generally US or EU. I've got no idea if there are any difference between US and EU in spray guns but if japanese spray guns standards are the same as the US I'll just check if they use the same here.

AH! so I'll use this gun for base and clear, for primer I was thinking buying a Devilbiss StartingLine (there are made here and aren't so expensive). They're not amazing but I'll still get Devilbiss quality. Bad choice ? any gun will do the job ?

Thanks a lot for your advices anyways ! Can't wait to see my paint runing, orange peeling etc hahaha!
It is a great gun and you won't be sorry. It is perfectly suited for painting bike frames. Keep its setting to a round spray pattern. The control is the top knob. I don't know anything about connectors outside of the US. YES, get the Iwata air control! Others can do the job, just not as well (I've explained about different types in my other posts). Get the Iwata aluminum 150 ml cup. I'm not sure what filters you are talking about. I have an airline filter at the base of my gun. That is important. Most dust nibs on the surface of the paint come through the hose airline (not through the air). I also strain paint through a filter while pouring the paint into the cup. 3M disposable cups have a filter in the lid of the cup.

If you use the 3M disposable cups (an outstanding idea for clear and a good idea for primers) you will need to get the 3M adaptor that corresponds to your paint gun. You will not need a primer gun if you use disposable cups and clean the gun carefully after each use.

The reason to have a separate primer gun is because it is difficult to 100% clean all residue of primer after each use. And it is very difficult to get rid of that residue after it has been building up over time. That residue can interfere with color coats and especially clear coats! It only has to happen once to you to spoil a paint job you have spent many hours working on to realize the mistake of using a gun that was not throughly clean. Remember that it is much harder to start over because you now have to remove the paint as well.

This is why I love, love, love my 3M Accurspray gun as a primer gun. Because the cups are disposable and the nozzle is disposable, I can always have a clean gun every time I use it. I'm careful with cleaning the nozzle so I only have to change them once a year or so (+ -). Also it is very light and doesn't tire my hand/arm as much.

Your hose fittings need to be HVLP compliant. This means they have a bigger through hole. Don't get the regular industrial kind sold everywhere. For example when I got my 1st HVLP gun, I changed my regular industrial fittings to fittings sold by DeVilbiss for their spray guns. They sell those kind of fittings other places too. I got aluminum ones because I want to eliminate as much weight as possible.

This is important. You want a very good airline filter after your normal airline regulator. Just to be clear from the compressor air supply line (maybe hose, maybe pipe) to your spray area (booth) you will have 1st, a normal airline filter than an air pressure regulator and then a 2nd filter. Sometimes the 1st air filter comes after the air pressure regulator. These 2nd filters are designed for paint spraying and are often very expensive. There is a cheaper one that uses a toilet paper roll as a filter. The reason this 2nd special filter is so important is because most contaminants come through the airline as water/oil/crud from the compressor. What looks like dust nibs spoiling the smooth paint surface seldom comes through the air. It comes from your compressor. Don't forget this important tip or always be satisfied with junk on the surface or your paint. To continue our list of equipment from the compressor, an air hose will go from that 2nd filter to the bottom of you paint gun where i have a small disposable 3rd filter. Why have all 3 filters you might ask? Because junk in your finished paint looks terrible and requires work to buff out. After that disposable filter is your Iwata (don't get a cheaper one) air pressure regulator. Air pressure needs to be regulated at the gun for HVLP guns because they require exact air pressure to operate the best.

Last edited by Doug Fattic; 02-27-21 at 02:45 AM.
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Old 02-27-21, 12:10 PM
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Thanks for bringing the 3m gun to our attention, Doug. I have always been paranoid about not being able to get rid of all the paint while cleaning.
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Old 03-08-21, 07:48 PM
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This thread triggered a need to liquidate some underutilized cash so I ordered a W-300 off ebay. It arrived today and I wanted to share my giddy impression of the overall quality, which is pure bliss. There's a reason the Japanese are world renowned for quality products. I haven't sprayed with it yet but if it's performance is anything near it's visual appearance it will be an orgasmic experiences!

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Old 03-11-21, 10:50 AM
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Amazing gun !
So now I decided which gun to use I should figure out what to put between the compressor and the gun.
I was thinking to put a air regulator, water and dust filters at the compressor outlet, then the hose to the gun where I'll put the Iwata air controller + an water filter. Am I forgetting anything?
I've read a post (don't remember where) from a painter who said that he has something like: compressor > water filter > hose > water and dust filter fixed on the wall > other hose to the gun > water and air regulator on the gun inlet -I don't remember where he put the first air regulator (at the compressor outlet or between the two hoses) but he uses 3 water filters.
What's your opinions ?

Thanks again !
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Old 03-11-21, 12:12 PM
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A lot of people have copper cooling stage after the compressor to get most of the water out. Whatever you can do to cool the air will help with water.
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Old 03-12-21, 09:26 AM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by Mulo View Post
Amazing gun !
So now I decided which gun to use I should figure out what to put between the compressor and the gun.
I was thinking to put a air regulator, water and dust filters at the compressor outlet, then the hose to the gun where I'll put the Iwata air controller + an water filter. Am I forgetting anything?
I've read a post (don't remember where) from a painter who said that he has something like: compressor > water filter > hose > water and dust filter fixed on the wall > other hose to the gun > water and air regulator on the gun inlet -I don't remember where he put the first air regulator (at the compressor outlet or between the two hoses) but he uses 3 water filters.
What's your opinions ?
As I've written in previous posts, your biggest enemy to getting a smooth glossy paint surface is water and oil coming from the compressor through the air line to your paint gun. A piston type compressor builds up heat in both the compressor and air. When the air cools, condensation forms in the line. In a perfect world where no expense is spared, a dryer is attached between the compressor and the start of the air line. This cools the air and takes out the moisture.

I'm going to assume your budget does not allow for a dryer. I don't have one either. What I do have is 3 airline filters designed to work together just outside of my spray booth. They sell these as a unit for paint spraying in a booth. The 1st one is a regular filter that removes most of the water/oil. The 2nd one has a finer mesh filter to take our what the 1st one missed. The 3rd one is a desiccant type of filter that removes any remaining water. Desiccant filters are filled with those little balls that absorb moisture.

After my 3 filters comes my airline pressure regulator. Than I have a hose that goes inside of my booth. It is in 2 parts. The 1st rubber section goes to a kind of manifold on the wall of the booth. The 2nd section is lighter than rubber hose. The 2 sections kind of stabilize the 2nd section so it is influenced less by the weight of a unsupported longer hose.

On the end of the hose I put a light weight quick release (made mostly out of aluminum) hose connector. Make sure you get one with a bigger hole that is designed for high flow HVLP guns Don't use a standard one commonly available.

On my spray guns I have one of those small bulb shaped light weight airline filters and then the 2nd air line regulator. Of course I have the male portion of the quick release connector on the other end of the filter. On my clear coat gun I have a small desiccant type filter. On my primer and color guns I have those bulb shaped filters.

Years ago I used to be driven crazy but occasional junk on the surface of my paint. They are usually described as dust nibs. All that stopped when I got serious about filtering my airline significantly.
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