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Want to start Road cycling where to start? which bike?

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Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Want to start Road cycling where to start? which bike?

Old 05-26-19, 08:03 PM
  #76  
Armyguy1914
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Originally Posted by noodle soup View Post
Just get a Trek Domane SL5 Disc, and don't look back.

Well that is nice but what is the Giant equivalent to this bike.? This one is 2500 bucks I did apply for a Trek card but havent got answer yet. Well I did get approve for Giant though.
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Old 05-26-19, 08:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Armyguy1914 View Post
Well that is nice but what is the Giant equivalent to this bike.? This one is 2500 bucks I did apply for a Trek card but havent got answer yet. Well I did get approve for Giant though.
I never wanted a Trek, and thought this bike(Domane) was a joke.

A few years later my custom geometry CF bike was stolen. When I did a few weeks of research, Trek Domane was a near perfect fit. I bought a shop demo bike(60cm bikes rarely get used) for less than half of retail.

It’s far better than my custom frameset ever dreamed of being.

I still hate Trek, but they make a damn good bike.

Buying your first road bike is tough, I wouldn’t plan on marrying your first. Your body will change, and so will your fit.
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Old 05-26-19, 08:19 PM
  #78  
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Thanks for the advice

Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
You can ride any bike as far as you like.

Some bikes are probably going to be more comfortable for some riders for long rides.

Bikes with race-geometry frames tend to put the rider in a lower, more stretched-out posture. Riders need to have strong legs, strong cores, and very flexible backs, necks, and shoulders to ride a long time in the bent-over race posture. if you do, no problem. Also, you could take that "race geometry" frame and add a lot of spacers and an upturned stem and raise the bars up and move them back. The bike would still have very quick handling and a short wheel base.

Also race frames tend to be less compliant. When you pedal, they transfer maximum power to the rear wheel. Also, when you ht a bump, pebblwe or tiny crack in the pavement, the bike transfers that energy right into you, the rider ... in the form of pain.

However, if your body is strong enough, it can absorb the shocks.

The big problem with a race bike is that as soon as you get tired, everything which makes it work makes it hurt. When your legs get tired, they cannot flex to absorb the bumps so swell, and they cannot hold as much weight. That puts more stress on the core ... and when your lower back starts aching, you will tend to put more weight on your bars, which hurts the shoulders, neck, and hands. Also you might tend to lock your elbows, which really hurts over time.

As you try to sit more upright to rest your lower back and shoulders, you are putting more wait on the saddle, which was designed to be ridden in the long and low position, and won't offer proper support for a rider sitting more upright---which means more pain.

If you are fit enough to ride as far as you want in the race posture, then a race bike can be as comfortable as any other bike. Pro racers sometimes spend six or seven hours in the saddle. of course, they expect to be in pain through much of a race sometimes ...

it is possible you could set up the TCR to be more comfortable on long rides. I have an upward-angled stem on my Cervelo R-clone, and an inch-and-a-half of spacers. However .... I can definitely feel the added strain at the end of a long ride compared to my more upright, endurance-frame bikes. Again, it all depends on Your physical capacities.

Your best bet might to be to buy the bike you really want, and if in a while you find you want something else too, get that too. But if you are going to buy a bike ... buy a bike you really like. Chances are you will enjoy riding it even if it takes a while to tweak it to fit the way you need it.
Hey well I was considering the TCR advance but I would pine to be comfortable on a long ride as to which I would like to do. I doubt I will be racing but also want a bike that is balance with comfortable and quick .
I want that 2016 Emonda I had post that pic of. I got a text from dude it said.

Hi
Are u still interested on the bike, my AC broke todsy and i will need for the repair man in the morning if you like to come all the way to high point i will let u have it for 1000 also i wil put water cges, saddle bag and rear light, let me konw
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Old 05-26-19, 08:34 PM
  #79  
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Okay I see

Originally Posted by noodle soup View Post
I never wanted a Trek, and thought this bike(Domane) was a joke.

A few years later my custom geometry CF bike was stolen. When I did a few weeks of research, Trek Domane was a near perfect fit. I bought a shop demo bike(60cm bikes rarely get used) for less than half of retail.

It’s far better than my custom frameset ever dreamed of being.

I still hate Trek, but they make a damn good bike.

Buying your first road bike is tough, I wouldn’t plan on marrying your first. Your body will change, and so will your fit.
Well it looks like a nice bike. What are you pros and cons so far? I wonder what is the equivalent to a Giant bike full carbon ?
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Old 05-26-19, 09:12 PM
  #80  
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I bought an SL5 two weeks ago. It's a full carbon bike with 105 components.

I'm finding that little changes make a big difference in comfort. That, while my abs are strong, the rest of my core isn't up to keeping me comfortable on the bike yet. Probably on account of my bad posture, even if I am still fairly flexible at 45 (I can still bend over and touch the ground).

Frankly, I'd hate to have a bike that was less forgiving. I can't imagine got unlistenable it would be to ride.

Checking Giant's website, the Defy Advance 2 is the closest - carbon and 105. I'm not certain if there's other differences they might account for the price difference, but I will say the Isospeed on the Domane is really nice.

Last edited by guachi; 05-27-19 at 10:17 PM.
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Old 05-27-19, 02:35 PM
  #81  
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Good afternoon

Originally Posted by guachi View Post
I bought an SL5 two weeks ago. It's a full carbon bike with 105 components.

I'm finding that little changes make a big difference in comfort. That, while my abs are strong, the rest of my core isn't up to keeping me comfortable on the bike yet. Probably on account of my bad posture, even if I am still fairly flexible at 45 (I can still bring over and touch the ground).

Frankly, I'd hate to have a bike that was less forgiving. I can't imagine got unlistenable it would be to ride.

Checking Giant's website, the Defy Advance 2 is the closest - carbon and 105. I'm not certain if there's other differences they might account for the price difference, but I will say the Isospeed on the Domane is really nice.
Hello hows it going well I have been looking and so far I see Defy Advance 2 which is $2100 with 105 components. Also Defy advance 1 which has Ultegra . I wonder is that upgrade from 105 to Ultegra worth it.
.
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Old 05-27-19, 04:29 PM
  #82  
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I have an all-Ultegra bike and a couple 105 bikes ..... you didn't mention how much the price difference was, but the real answer is "How much can you spend?"

it is impossible to tell .... direct comparisons between two different frames running different tires, even if they weigh pretty much the same ... I'd say the Ultegra shifts a thousandth of a percent smoother (or the shifters feel that tiny bit smoother) and the Ultegra bike stops that much better ... but it could be the extremely sticky front tire on the Ultegra bike.

If spending the extra money is going to hurt elsewhere .... your call. I generally advise that one buy as much hardware as possible up front but i have(as noted) two 105 bikes (and a whole 105 drive train waiting for a home) and would never upgrade those bikes. 105 is really, really good.

If you could link to the two bikes we could see if the only difference was the drive train, and how much the price difference might be.
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Old 05-27-19, 05:10 PM
  #83  
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
I have an all-Ultegra bike and a couple 105 bikes ..... you didn't mention how much the price difference was, but the real answer is "How much can you spend?"

it is impossible to tell .... direct comparisons between two different frames running different tires, even if they weigh pretty much the same ... I'd say the Ultegra shifts a thousandth of a percent smoother (or the shifters feel that tiny bit smoother) and the Ultegra bike stops that much better ... but it could be the extremely sticky front tire on the Ultegra bike.

If spending the extra money is going to hurt elsewhere .... your call. I generally advise that one buy as much hardware as possible up front but i have(as noted) two 105 bikes (and a whole 105 drive train waiting for a home) and would never upgrade those bikes. 105 is really, really good.

If you could link to the two bikes we could see if the only difference was the drive train, and how much the price difference might be.
Well the Defy Advance 1 is 2520 with Ultegra and Defy Advance 2 is 2100. not sure if that 400 is worth the difference.
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Old 05-27-19, 10:32 PM
  #84  
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I think Shimano themselves said no difference, just weight. Or maybe that was no difference between Ultegra and DuraAce.

In any event, I think it would be unlikely you'd notice a difference. Even the Tiagra stuff is really nice.

Spend the $400 on all the biking accessories you might need.
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Old 05-28-19, 05:52 AM
  #85  
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I was just bored so i looked on ebay and i saw this.
Starting bid:
US $800


Enter US $800.00 or moreGiant Defy advanced 2016 size small/ Well its on ebay start bid 800 or best offer with ship of 125








Giant Defy advanced 2016 size small. Condition is Used, and has a few scratches but otherwise in great condition. Giant carbon SLR wheel set, shimano 105 shifters with ultegra cranks, ultegra F/R derailleurs, xt hydraulic brakes calipers with the Giant conduct hydraulic adapter. gearing is 46 x 36 front and 11-28 rear 11 speed. U.S. 48 states only shipping
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Old 05-28-19, 06:24 AM
  #86  
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Gearing is a little low for quick road riding IMO.
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Old 05-28-19, 07:05 AM
  #87  
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Good morning

Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
Gearing is a little low for quick road riding IMO.

Hows it going well you say gearing is low? What is it suppise to be ? I saw it has Ultegra f/r derailleur. Few 105 parts but for a new rider what does this mean? Is that a good deal or should I just stick to brand new ? One I'm really looking at Giant Defy advanced 2. Its has good components 105 R7000 which is mid range and I heard good things. There is a Advance 1 that has Ultegra but someone said not worth it. Just buy accessories shoes petal and gear.
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Old 05-28-19, 08:23 AM
  #88  
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It has standard CX gearing for the front chainrings. Easy/cheap enough to buy either 50/34 chainrings (compact gearing) or just a 52 chain ring and swap out the 46 and have mid-compact (52/36). Also, it looks like it might be an older Ultegra crank, possibly 6600 or 6700.

Last edited by rivers; 05-28-19 at 08:27 AM.
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Old 05-28-19, 09:38 AM
  #89  
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I dunno, but you might do well to go grab that Emonda for $900 and then hit the local Trek shop for a few hundred bucks in gear, a cursory fitting, etc.
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Old 05-28-19, 09:46 AM
  #90  
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The chain rings, at 46/36, are both a little lower (46 teeth versus 50) and higher (36 teeth versus 34) compared to the common 50-34 compact road gearing. That means you might spend a lot of time in the top few gears, or spinning your legs really fast,, while on the climbs you would have to push a little bit harder.

That bike, as @rivers notes in post #88 , is designed for gravel or rough roads or steep hills .... or for an old, fat guy like myself. That's great gearing if you ride dirt and gravel where you get less traction---but with the taller small ring (36 teeth) you don't get as wide a range of gears which means the few really steep hills on your route will really hurt, while on the descents you won't be able to pedal fast enough. it is more a competition set-up, designed to focus output in an optimal range rather than be more useful over a variety of ranges.

As @rivers notes, a compact chain ring set shouldn't cost much, and I think the compact road rings would fit without issue on the existing spider. or you could just buy a whole new crank set.

I have a bike geared 48-38-28 with a 14-34 cassette ... I find that I spend a lot of time in the top two gears and the big ring (the bike is set up for hauling cargo but I don't do that so much anymore.) I think with the 46/36 you'd find yourself spending all your time in 46-11 and 46-12 and wishing for more.

Not sure,.. eveverybody rides differently.
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Old 05-28-19, 09:51 AM
  #91  
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Originally Posted by rivers View Post
Also, it looks like it might be an older Ultegra crank, possibly 6600 or 6700.
It's a 6800 crankset.

6600 and 6700 both use a 5 arm design.
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Old 05-28-19, 09:57 AM
  #92  
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hello

Originally Posted by rivers View Post
It has standard CX gearing for the front chainrings. Easy/cheap enough to buy either 50/34 chainrings (compact gearing) or just a 52 chain ring and swap out the 46 and have mid-compact (52/36). Also, it looks like it might be an older Ultegra crank, possibly 6600 or 6700.
hey thanks for clearing that up for me. Im new to this still and i see i have much to learn.
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Old 05-28-19, 10:00 AM
  #93  
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hello

Originally Posted by goenrdoug View Post
I dunno, but you might do well to go grab that Emonda for $900 and then hit the local Trek shop for a few hundred bucks in gear, a cursory fitting, etc.
You know right now it seems like the logical thing to pick up that Emonda and just buy things for it. That Emonda is full carbon. someday i can maybe pick up a carbon wheel set. It has All Shimano 105 think 5800 components. The new one is 105 R7000 not sure what changed in the newer model. So it can be ugraded to newer 105 or Ultegra correct?
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Old 05-28-19, 10:30 AM
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That Emonda is a nice bike.

105 is a totally respectable groupset and the 5800 and r7000 are negligibly different -- you won't need to upgrade anything as it wouldn't really be an upgrade, honestly. Yes, if some part or another wore out or was broken, you could certainly buy a new part from the newer version of the group (or upgrade that particular piece to Ultegra) without compatibility issues. But, again, you won't need to and won't suffer any lack of performance if you ride the 5800 stuff indefinitely.

The bike needs nothing beyond appropriate pedals to go with your growth as a cyclist. Initially, you'll probably have cheap/basic flat pedals. Eventually, you'll get some nice shoes and appropriate pedals to go with (I like Speedplays) them. The wheels on it are perfectly fine and will serve you well while you figure out all the other new-guy stuff (equipment, acclimating your body, local rides to join, etc.)

I say, go ahead and take the plunge.
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Old 05-28-19, 10:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Armyguy1914 View Post
You know right now it seems like the logical thing to pick up that Emonda and just buy things for it. That Emonda is full carbon. someday i can maybe pick up a carbon wheel set. It has All Shimano 105 think 5800 components. The new one is 105 R7000 not sure what changed in the newer model. So it can be ugraded to newer 105 or Ultegra correct?
Why would you buy a carbon wheelset for it?
That bike, as is, wont hold you back. It wont hold you back in 2 years either.

Buying more expensive stuff is fine to do if you want, and if your reason for doing so is 'because i can' or 'i want to try it', then by all means do it. But at least have a reason to buy a carbon wheelset before doing so. It seems wasteful to not have a reason for doing so. You certainly dont lack research, as evidenced by this thread, so I am sure you will look extensively at carbon wheels and understand what the benefit will be for you when the time comes.
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Old 05-28-19, 12:00 PM
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Hows it going

Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
Why would you buy a carbon wheelset for it?
That bike, as is, wont hold you back. It wont hold you back in 2 years either.

Buying more expensive stuff is fine to do if you want, and if your reason for doing so is 'because i can' or 'i want to try it', then by all means do it. But at least have a reason to buy a carbon wheelset before doing so. It seems wasteful to not have a reason for doing so. You certainly dont lack research, as evidenced by this thread, so I am sure you will look extensively at carbon wheels and understand what the benefit will be for you when the time comes.
Well I have been looking so and I just was saying about the carbon wheels only if I can get deal. Not about to run out and spend 600-800 on that lol. Naw dont need them that bad. I see you just saving weight it benefits if you racing or being competitive but I'm in group rides and fitness. I wonder buying new Defy Advance 2 vs buying 2nd pre owned like that Emonda
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Old 05-28-19, 12:04 PM
  #97  
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Hello

Originally Posted by goenrdoug View Post
That Emonda is a nice bike.

105 is a totally respectable groupset and the 5800 and r7000 are negligibly different -- you won't need to upgrade anything as it wouldn't really be an upgrade, honestly. Yes, if some part or another wore out or was broken, you could certainly buy a new part from the newer version of the group (or upgrade that particular piece to Ultegra) without compatibility issues. But, again, you won't need to and won't suffer any lack of performance if you ride the 5800 stuff indefinitely.

The bike needs nothing beyond appropriate pedals to go with your growth as a cyclist. Initially, you'll probably have cheap/basic flat pedals. Eventually, you'll get some nice shoes and appropriate pedals to go with (I like Speedplays) them. The wheels on it are perfectly fine and will serve you well while you figure out all the other new-guy stuff (equipment, acclimating your body, local rides to join, etc.)

I say, go ahead and take the plunge.
Yeah so far the Emonda is what I'm leaning toward so far. Look like he took good care of it. He is keeping his petals and put regular ones back on. He put Saddle bad and water cages and light.
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Old 05-28-19, 12:15 PM
  #98  
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If you have the space at home,have you considered getting a less expensive bike and putting the extra money into a smart trainer?

I have a Wahoo Kickr Core on the way because i actually like training indoors and it's stupid hot outside in the summer here in Georgia.
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Old 05-28-19, 03:32 PM
  #99  
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One myth sold to everyone by Shimano and the rest of the bike industry was this whole "upgrade" saga. They realized that their products would last for years and outperform most riders ... so why would anyone give the companies any money once they bought a bike?

So, the "upgrades" ....

I took an Ultegra derailleur off a bike and replaced it with 105 because I was getting a weird clicking and I wanted to make sure everything was checked out and operating perfectly so I could track down the noise (still haven't. ) Once I found out the noise wasn't coming from a bent derailleur, I could have swapped the Ultegra back in ... but honestly I couldn't tell a difference, so why? I have 4500 and 4600 Tiagra on a couple bikes and I could throw a 105 drive train (in boxes on shelves, already purchased) on either ... but why?

Most of us are already riding bikes which work better than the bikes the Tour de France winners rode two decades ago .... and many of us, bikes functionally equivalent to the winners' bikes from five or six years ago ... or even more recent. It's like we can buy Formula One cars and ride them on the street.

How many of us are really using our bikes to their absolute maximum levels of performance? Half a percent? Considering these bike good enough to meet the needs of the top half-percent of competitive riders in the world .....

But having a bike like that only generates income once for a company ... so ....

This sometimes arises in discussions here. If I am 10X pounds overweight, how many dollars should I spend to save 10x grams? A lighter wheelset? $800 to save 300 grams ... but I am 40 pounds overweight (well, more actually.) So in overall weight of bike and rider, I have saved 1/300th? So I will climb every hill in only 299/300ths of the time .... and it only cost me $300. Yahoo.

That carbon wheel set ... well it won't stop well in the rain, but I don't plan to ride in the rain (of course, we never Plan to ... ) and of course, every time I hit the brakes I will be eating up those expensive wheels .... and maybe though they are lighter they are not as stiff as what I had, so there is a net loss of efficiency of power transfer and a lower max cornering speed ... is that offset by the 300-gram savings?

I think everyone will tell you the same thing----don't buy more expensive parts if you want to go faster. Go online, google interval training and hill repeats ... then go do them. Create an organized training schedule and follow it. or, use the tried and true method of trying to keep up with faster riders until you can. If you want performance, it is Rider, not bike. Put Chris Froome on any bike from Walmart and put me on his bike and he will beat me in every race every time ... and by ridiculous margins. He could beat me in a road race on an undersized Walmart mountain bike. It Ain't the Bike.

In fact, when I thought I was going to be doing okay financially a few years back I decided to treat myself. I built up a lightweight CF frame with pretty racy parts---not the over-the-top ridiculous parts, but the completed bike, in showroom trim, was probably under 16 pounds (somewhere near the UCI minimum for World Tour bikes, in other words).

I decided to build an endurance-frame version of the bike, for when my lower back wouldn't tolerate any more miles on the racy frame. And I decided to go with 105 instead of Ultegra. I had the money for Ultegra .... but I didn't see the value. I knew 105 was awesome from using it on another off my bikes, and I couldn't justify spending a few hundred more for whatever the difference in performance might be---possibly entirely placebo.

You make your choices. You might have to spend the money on the exotic parts and such, and then come back here five years from now telling other new riders "Don't fall for that 'upgrade' line." Whatever is right for you.

Any of the bikes you have suggested here would be more bike than you would need unless you were in the top one percent of riders in the world .... and even then, they'd never let you down, it'd just be that you'd ride the bikes your sponsors gave you.

I suggest you buy a good bike and Ride it. You want to mess with it? Try different tires when the old ones wear out. Find the perfect saddle, the perfect pedals, the perfect shoes. More important, find the perfect set-up---and then change it to keep it perfect as your body adapts. Change the bar tape. Get super-light bottle cages (I found some at the old (defunkt) Nashbar, 26 grams for ten dollars.)

Get a GPS (I use my phone and Ride with GPS and Strava, both free of charge) and track every ride. Watch whether attacking a particular hill is faster than hitting it more slowly and holding a steadier pace ... until you can storm all the way up it with full power. Try different cadences to see what your body likes and what is actually faster or slower. Lay out routes in your area with a lot of climbing, or do climbing loops, and then lay out routes which are flatter for recovery days and distance days. Set aside one day a week (or every two weeks, whatever) for exploring and ride to some place you've never gone before.

Try different energy bars and gels, or mixtures of dried fruit and nuts, or bananas and peanut butter sandwiches ... try different sports drinks or whatever ... find out how to keep your body fueled and hydrated at different times of the year.

There is so much to cycling that doesn't cost hardly any money once you have bought the basics ... and you can still have the fun of comparison shopping and analyzing different products and methods.

When I thought I was going to have good cash flow, I shopped frequently and got boxes shipped to me at least weekly ... then things changed and I decided I am not buying anything but tubes and tires and chain lube. Riding is Exactly as much fun. And the cost is almost zero.

Get a good bike. Ride your good bike.

Or whatever else you choose to do ... I am not giving orders, just relating stories.

Last edited by Maelochs; 05-28-19 at 03:38 PM.
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Old 05-29-19, 08:03 AM
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Armyguy1914
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Bikes: Trek Dual Sport 3, Trek Emonda 5 Full carbon road bike,

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Hey everyone





⁹Thanks everyone for your advice and wisdom I went ahead and got that 2017 Emonda S 5 I did get it for 900 now I'm gonna take it to Trek and have it set up to me.

Last edited by Armyguy1914; 05-29-19 at 08:05 AM. Reason: Forgot to add picture
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