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Moistures not so Unique Frame-Fit?

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Moistures not so Unique Frame-Fit?

Old 04-19-21, 07:06 PM
  #76  
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
Honestly, I really liked drop bars.

As i continue to adapt my riding position, I may end up switching back.
When I rode nothing but MTBs I never felt comfortable with the narrow drop bars on road bikes until I was gifted a couple of old road bikes that I had to rehab. Now the most comfortable position for me is in the drops, but I would never put drops on a MTB-that's just stupid. You're right to like drops and eventually you'll go back to them.
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Old 04-21-21, 10:08 AM
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
BTW there are commuter handlebars that also give you the "handshake" hand position and also accept flat bar brake levers. The Dutch or Japanese handlebar for example but may shorten your reach. Some Japanese handlebar sweep forward and then back so does not compromise reach, it can offer the same riding position you have now with improved comfort for longer rides.

I've used such handlebar (Japanese) and they are almost as comfortable in long rides as regular drop bars.

example:

Hey Cube, Every time I've ridden a bike with this style bars I've felt like the only thing missing is the pink tassles hanging out the bar ends. They feel awkward as all get out to me, like maybe the bike has training wheels too. Sorry, just my opinion. Like butts, we all have one and some should not be shown publicly, like maybe mine.
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Old 04-21-21, 11:56 AM
  #78  
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Originally Posted by Bigbus View Post
Hey Cube, Every time I've ridden a bike with this style bars I've felt like the only thing missing is the pink tassles hanging out the bar ends. They feel awkward as all get out to me, like maybe the bike has training wheels too. Sorry, just my opinion. Like butts, we all have one and some should not be shown publicly, like maybe mine.
Bullhorn bars
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Old 06-21-22, 07:15 AM
  #79  
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I think it's time to revisit this thread with my latest frame fit... So I switched back to 46cm bars with a normal drop and slammed a 110mm stem as seen in this photo (5mm longer reach than stock coming from these new bars..)

It felt great at first, but suddenly I felt like my saddle was about 1.5cm too low. That it when I crossed the line into too much handlebar drop. I will take 1.5cm of spacers and put them underneath the stem to compensate.

It's been a very long journey, with never ending changes to my fit. It doesn't end here.

With the handlebars 1.5cm higher, and the saddle 0.5cm higher, that would be my baseline fit as of right now. I can now ride up hills I used to walk, and ride for much longer than before without any back pain whatsoever!

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Old 06-21-22, 07:17 AM
  #80  
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Those strap in pedals were super critical for my fit. Previously, I thought I needed an insane amount of saddle setback to compensate for a glaringly wrong foot placement. A simple foot repositioning helped me put the saddle fore/aft into a far more comfortable position for my back.
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Old 06-21-22, 09:34 PM
  #81  
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I've tried three different foot positions on the pedals but I settled with the one where the pedal is closest to my toes. That's not to avoid toe overlap but the position opened my hips more and helped lay down more torque comfortably.

The position I chose may cause more load on the arms though and you may have to compensate for it with posture and reach to unload the arms.
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Old 06-22-22, 02:20 AM
  #82  
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I've settled with a foot position that slightly favours the middle of my foot rather than the toes/ball of my foot like I used to ride. Bit of a compromise here, but even when using flat platform pedals I noticed that I don't ride with such an excessive saddle setback anymore. I used to think a standard 15mm setback seatpost was completely the wrong size for me when in reality, it may be borderline too little setback but still totallly in range in terms of fit.. just maxed out. This was a pretty key change for me in ensuring long distance comfort.
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Old 06-22-22, 03:21 AM
  #83  
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
I've settled with a foot position that slightly favours the middle of my foot rather than the toes/ball of my foot like I used to ride. Bit of a compromise here, but even when using flat platform pedals I noticed that I don't ride with such an excessive saddle setback anymore. I used to think a standard 15mm setback seatpost was completely the wrong size for me when in reality, it may be borderline too little setback but still totallly in range in terms of fit.. just maxed out. This was a pretty key change for me in ensuring long distance comfort.
Another reason I chose to go near the toes is for spinning. I found it's easier and smoother to spin high cadence with the pedal close to the toes than in the middle. It gives more range of motion for the calves to help smooth out pedaling at high cadence. I guess it will depend on your preferred cadence.
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Old 06-22-22, 02:25 PM
  #84  
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Originally Posted by koala logs View Post
Another reason I chose to go near the toes is for spinning. I found it's easier and smoother to spin high cadence with the pedal close to the toes than in the middle. It gives more range of motion for the calves to help smooth out pedaling at high cadence. I guess it will depend on your preferred cadence.
agree with the spin and better calf activation. Actively pressing into the pedal spindle with the ball of my foot by flexing it is helpful. But it seems to have thrown my saddle setback requirements out of wack in doing so.
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Old 06-22-22, 08:56 PM
  #85  
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
agree with the spin and better calf activation. Actively pressing into the pedal spindle with the ball of my foot by flexing it is helpful. But it seems to have thrown my saddle setback requirements out of wack in doing so.
I actually move my calves differently. In fact, I only exert relatively small amount of effort with it throughout the pedal stroke. I keep it more or less relaxed throughout the forward and downstroke with the heels dropped. My calves only begin to point down ever so slightly when I pull my feet up in the upstroke. That is to keep the ball of my feet planted on the pedals when I'm pulling to unload the upstroke pedal. As I begin the forward stroke, I then use my calves as a spring as it goes back to heels dropped position. It's impossible to do it properly and smoothly if the pedal at the middle of my foot.

It's the only way I can spin easily with pedal heels down on a flat pedal. It's mostly a matter of personal preference and I do like pedaling heels down better.
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Old 06-22-22, 09:18 PM
  #86  
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Originally Posted by koala logs View Post
I actually move my calves differently. In fact, I only exert relatively small amount of effort with it throughout the pedal stroke. I keep it more or less relaxed throughout the forward and downstroke with the heels dropped. My calves only begin to point down ever so slightly when I pull my feet up in the upstroke. That is to keep the ball of my feet planted on the pedals when I'm pulling to unload the upstroke pedal. As I begin the forward stroke, I then use my calves as a spring as it goes back to heels dropped position. It's impossible to do it properly and smoothly if the pedal at the middle of my foot.

It's the only way I can spin easily with pedal heels down on a flat pedal. It's mostly a matter of personal preference and I do like pedaling heels down better.
sounds to me like the standard purposes of your calves during cycling - to keep your spin smooth during the lumpy part of your spin - pulling up and out of the dead spot.
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Old 06-22-22, 09:23 PM
  #87  
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I am excited to say that I have finally reached my next major breakthrough with my frame fit... Since my inseam is about 2cm longer than average, assuming that these bikes are designed around the average 45% of your inseam (in proportion to torso length) ... This would explain why I need to add 15mm of spacers to my stack height, assuming that my saddle is currently at the correct height.

This bike may not be carbon, have the fanciest parts, or the best groupset. I digress. A better bike will once again redefine my expectations out of a bike. But I'm glad to savour every moment of this journey and take advantage of the time I have given with this fantastic bike - to be able to say, that I have one day, outgrown the bikes capabilities and potential. The day when it is finally time to move on.
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Old 06-23-22, 02:07 AM
  #88  
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Originally Posted by Bigbus View Post
Hey Cube, Every time I've ridden a bike with this style bars I've felt like the only thing missing is the pink tassles hanging out the bar ends. They feel awkward as all get out to me, like maybe the bike has training wheels too. Sorry, just my opinion. Like butts, we all have one and some should not be shown publicly, like maybe mine.
Replying to an old post. I just can't resist posting this!

Only real men rides pink bikes with tassles!
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Old 06-23-22, 02:13 AM
  #89  
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
This bike may not be carbon, have the fanciest parts, or the best groupset. I digress. A better bike will once again redefine my expectations out of a bike. But I'm glad to savour every moment of this journey and take advantage of the time I have given with this fantastic bike - to be able to say, that I have one day, outgrown the bikes capabilities and potential. The day when it is finally time to move on.
It's a great looking bike with decent parts. If I had such bike I'll be keeping it for a lifetime or until the frame collapses. I think the only way you'll outgrow it is the gears start to feel easier, you can simply slap bigger chainring in there. If you want even lower stack, there's +- 17 degree or even +-35 degree stems.
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Old 06-23-22, 10:50 AM
  #90  
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Re pic in post #79. The bars are set up incorrectly. You have the ends pointed up like fish hooks. Also, with the saddle angled down like that you'll be very uncomfortable if you work up to rides over 20 miles. After all this trial and failure, why not try getting fit at a shop?
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Old 06-23-22, 08:25 PM
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
Re pic in post #79. The bars are set up incorrectly. You have the ends pointed up like fish hooks. Also, with the saddle angled down like that you'll be very uncomfortable if you work up to rides over 20 miles. After all this trial and failure, why not try getting fit at a shop?
It sure does look like it in the photos.

Not at all in person.

Im not disregarding the fit of a professional. But I know how to set up my bike now.
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Old 06-23-22, 09:37 PM
  #92  
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
It sure does look like it in the photos.

Not at all in person.

Im not disregarding the fit of a professional. But I know how to set up my bike now.
Now that he mentioned it. I noticed the mud marks on the drops. Seems like you're moving your hands closer to you. Are you sure the stem is not too long? You might be overreaching. A symptom of overreaching is that your back is making a concave curve. The back posture should either be convex or slightly convex.
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Old 06-25-22, 08:41 AM
  #93  
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Originally Posted by koala logs View Post
Now that he mentioned it. I noticed the mud marks on the drops. Seems like you're moving your hands closer to you. Are you sure the stem is not too long? You might be overreaching. A symptom of overreaching is that your back is making a concave curve. The back posture should either be convex or slightly convex.
My posture is typically convex on my bikes bit I typically make a conscious effort to maintain a more or less neutral posture through the back when I ride.

This bike comes with a 110mm stem as stock. Handlebar is 46cm at the hoods with a 8°flare that angles out in 16° as you go lower down on the bars. (Drop: 130, Reach: 70) The bike is currently set up with the same stem angle/length, except these Easton bars are 46cm from end to end and have 5° of flare. (130mm, 75mm)

I think the slightly narrower bars with less flare should just about compensate for the extra 5mm in handlebar reach. However, I'd be fine with anything between 70-80mm bar reach, because my arms are super long.
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Old 06-25-22, 08:43 AM
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koala logs I just noticed those marks on my bars in post #79. Not sure where they are from. I hold the bars in a position where I can easily reach the bottom part of the brake levers with my index+middle finger.
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Old 06-25-22, 08:44 AM
  #95  
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stem and saddle now set at baseline -
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Old 06-25-22, 03:32 PM
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Originally Posted by koala logs View Post
It's a great looking bike with decent parts. If I had such bike I'll be keeping it for a lifetime or until the frame collapses. I think the only way you'll outgrow it is the gears start to feel easier, you can simply slap bigger chainring in there. If you want even lower stack, there's +- 17 degree or even +-35 degree stems.
I agree with you. Ultimately, future options would probably involve some sort of gravel race /cyclocross bike to keep things entertaining, while this one sticks around as a more comfort oriented option on the longer hauls. I acknowledge that I wouldn't ever need anything more than this bike, even though I'm sure I can make good use of those fancier options with carbon fibre. I am never left with the feeling that I am wanting for more, although I know one day we will get there.

This frame really is not designed for a handlebar positioning any lower than -7° stem slammed all the way against the headset cup.

In the future, my options will be
A:
https://josephkuosac.com/product/ste...opbar-o31-8mm/ in 47cm, size M

Or
B: https://www.controltechbikes.com/products/item/352.html

I was actually inspired by your comment to use a -17° stem, not to get lower, but to compensate for the rise that these bars offer.

Regardless which route I choose, i will have to go back to a 100mm stem.

I have yet to find an option which can serve as the perfect option without any compromise. I would like a 120mm drop (to forgo the use of any spacers underneath the stem, 47cm width with 0° of flare, or 46cm width at the hoods with 4-6° of flare. And 70mm handlebar reach.

​​​​​​
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Old 06-25-22, 08:22 PM
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The -17 degree stem would definitely improve the looks of your bike.
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Old 06-25-22, 08:38 PM
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Originally Posted by koala logs View Post
The -17 degree stem would definitely improve the looks of your bike.
Luckily with my long inseam and the design of this frame, I have the freedom of lowering the stem below baseline, which essentially puts me into a race position (plus a little extra chainstay length for added stability...)

182.5mm crank arms designed around a SRAM 1x, 3 bolt interface from my Taiwanese crank arm forging factory, and some 50c gravel fatties should keep me entertained for long enough until I find my next sweetie of a bike.

Luckily I'll always have room for improvement with this frame, as long as necessary and then some.
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Old 06-26-22, 05:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
Luckily with my long inseam and the design of this frame, I have the freedom of lowering the stem below baseline, which essentially puts me into a race position (plus a little extra chainstay length for added stability...)

182.5mm crank arms designed around a SRAM 1x, 3 bolt interface from my Taiwanese crank arm forging factory, and some 50c gravel fatties should keep me entertained for long enough until I find my next sweetie of a bike.

Luckily I'll always have room for improvement with this frame, as long as necessary and then some.
The benefits of gravel bike! Just don't make the mistake of cutting down that steerer tube. You might need it some day!
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Old 07-25-22, 06:09 PM
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Originally Posted by koala logs View Post
The benefits of gravel bike! Just don't make the mistake of cutting down that steerer tube. You might need it some day!
I have since then forgotten about it. I haven't used this bike for a while, in favour of my e bike and occasionally the Felt. The rear tire kept going flat after a tubeless conversion with tires which turned out not to be tubeless compatible. putting the tube back into the rear has fixed this, and the bike feels absolutely great now, like always... just better.

What an amazing bike. Extremely responsive around bends, amazing while decending, amazing while climbing... hell, its extremely stable and controllable even with the rear brake fully locking up the rear tire, causing it to slide about the gravel down a steep twisty decent, hard on the brakes. Its amazing.

Oh, I also crushed a fairly steep climb, which I was barely able to complete even 35% of with my road bike late last year. I am enjoying these road style bikes more than ever now, in a position that is much more aggressive, while being more comfortable than ever, not unnecessary stress on my quads, putting down more powe than ever, able to ride in this position much longer than before, comfortable. I attribute this to an extensive 3 months of myofascial release paired with regular stretching and postural adjustment excersises with a foam roller and several RMT sessions.
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