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What Do You Remember About Woodstock?

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What Do You Remember About Woodstock?

Old 05-19-21, 09:59 AM
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I was 16, into racing my 12' sailboat and we were driving out Mass Pike to a race in eastern NY state with my boat on top of the car. Passed and got passed by dozens of wild vehicles, hippies and hippies-to-be. I knew a little of that other world. (I used to go to Harvard Square for its bike shop, the Bicycle Exchange and the record store that was part of the Harvard Coop that had blues records. So I had seen a taste of the hippy world but that drive out was something else!)

The rest of the weekend was racing; its own all-encompassing world and we saw only a handful of the Woodstock crowd coming home. Never put this together before, but I don't think I got another haircut after Woodstock. A year later I started realizing my number was coming up, I read Norman Mailer's "The Naked and the Dead, Malcolm X's autobiography and knew I would be getting a high number or going to Federal prison. Went to engineering school as the longest haired student, got the gift of "264" freshman year, went to Nixon's inauguration protest and didn't cut my hair until Ford and graduation.

Funny full circle - My last haircut was at the start of Trump's last year in office. Growing it out "for" COVID reminded me of VIetnam and the Nixon days. Also how much I like my hair long. Yesterday I went to the woman who;s been cutting my hair for years - to get a cleanup trim. Back to my college routine of visiting a classmate twice a year for a trim and heartfelt conversation. College it was with one of those really grounded people, a woman I wish to this day I'd stayed in touch with simply as a good ally in life. (She intimidated me; being a really capable person.)

My music was already drifting toward the blues when Woodstock happened. Hendrix seemed to me to be from a different planet. Many years later, I realized that man could play the blues with the best and that it was deep in his soul. The musical "experience" of my lifetime was watching Muddy Waters and his southside Chigago band play in a Boston club on a Sunday night that next winter from 9pm to closing at 2. After midnight there were no other customers in the place. I sat mesmorized right in front of Muddy. Lifechanging.

My dream wasn't to be at another Woodstock but to go to southside Chicago to a club and see the the blues raw and in person. Sadly the gangs put an end to that dream. I've done the next best, going to Buddy Guy's downtown club. (Buddy Guy wasn't there and I was attending a convention, so the night I could go had no headliners; just local talent I'd never heard of. But still ... The convention was a mile away from the old Chess Records so I went there. Got to play my harmonica in the studio! Met Willie Dixon's grandson.)

Woodstock didn't chanmge my life. But those times sure did.
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Old 05-19-21, 11:34 AM
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Originally Posted by 79pmooney View Post
**snip**

Woodstock didn't change my life. But those times sure did.
Thanks for sharing. These are the types of stories I like to hear. Woodstock obviously impacted the people who were there, but it also impacted and influenced the rest of the world. These stories are interesting to me because they are a little slice of what your life was like at that given period of time. Its like a "what were you doing when" kind of thing. I mentioned the Berlin Wall before. I remember walking to my mother's house from work on that day, and she was in the kitchen, but the was in the kitchen preparing supper for her and Dad. She had the tv on, but it was merely background noise and she was paying no attention to it. As I walked in, I took a look at it and thought the scenes on the tv were different in a way, and that's when I decided to really pay some attention. I was saying holy sh*t and hey mum get in here!
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Old 05-19-21, 01:25 PM
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Here's something else I remember about Woodstock ...or a tangental Woodstock-related memory at least:

When I was ~10 or 11 years old -- so this would be circa 1971 -- my aunt & uncle gave me a half dozen paperback books for my birthday, all about rock music. (Clearly my Mom & Dad had told them that I'd developed a budding interest in music, and rock music in particular.) I remember that one of those books was Lillian Roxon's Rock Encyclopedia, and one was Richard Goldstein's The Poetry Of Rock, and another one was something by Nat Hentoff (I think; can't find anything in his bibliography that sounds familiar though). Anyhow, one of those paperback books was mostly record reviews, and it contained a chapter called The Record Review As Fiction. And while it was ostensibly (and very obliquely) a review of the Woodstock soundtrack album, it consisted solely of a narrative description of a poser at a party bragging about how he had attended the Woodstock concert, and all the party-goers were asking him questions about events over those three days, and eventually someone who clearly had actually attended the event shut this poser down in as terse and succinct a way as possible, like pure acid character assasination in three words or less...but suddenly everyone at the party realized that the poser had only seen the movie and not been to the event.

Really memorable. Really weird.
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Old 05-19-21, 01:52 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by Bob Ross View Post
Here's something else I remember about Woodstock ...or a tangental Woodstock-related memory at least:

When I was ~10 or 11 years old -- so this would be circa 1971 -- my aunt & uncle gave me a half dozen paperback books for my birthday, all about rock music. (Clearly my Mom & Dad had told them that I'd developed a budding interest in music, and rock music in particular.) I remember that one of those books was Lillian Roxon's Rock Encyclopedia, and one was Richard Goldstein's The Poetry Of Rock, and another one was something by Nat Hentoff (I think; can't find anything in his bibliography that sounds familiar though). Anyhow, one of those paperback books was mostly record reviews, and it contained a chapter called The Record Review As Fiction. And while it was ostensibly (and very obliquely) a review of the Woodstock soundtrack album, it consisted solely of a narrative description of a poser at a party bragging about how he had attended the Woodstock concert, and all the party-goers were asking him questions about events over those three days, and eventually someone who clearly had actually attended the event shut this poser down in as terse and succinct a way as possible, like pure acid character assassination in three words or less...but suddenly everyone at the party realized that the poser had only seen the movie and not been to the event.

Really memorable. Really weird.
This does sound vaguely familiar, Bob, at least in a sense that there have been a lot of posers out there concerning Woodstock. I have been able to smoke out a few myself, namely an age call. I figure, since I was 11 or so at the time of the event, I was born in 1958. I'll be 63 next month. So anyone claiming that they were there and did this blah blah blah and that, blah blah blah, I just call them on it and say, so you are (insert my age at that particular moment plus 7-10 years)? It usually brought a lot of silence. My sister in law is turning 70 next month. I've never quizzed her on it, but I will. Surely she has a story or two to tell.

Oh hey I just thought of another funny memory about Woodstock. My wife and I have known each other since birth. Truly. We were born in the same hospital, a couple days apart, and our mom's knew each other. We played together as kids, so her folks were as familiar to me as my folks. Her dad used to really get me upset by calling Woodstock, "Wood Stick". He'd say, "So, Jeffrey, are you still listening to the Wood Stick music?" He was a real tease, and always knew how to get under my skin. Later, after Wife and I were married, he'd found other ways of doing exactly that. When I got assigned to a base in Germany, and they would come to visit us, he would always pronounce "Deutche mark" as, doosh-mark. This really got me hot under the collar, because I'd play right into his little scheme, correct his pronunciation with the correct way to say it, and the next time he'd say doosh-mark all over again. Man, I'd get pissy about it, and Wife would grab my arm and scold me and tell me to calm down. He always grinned. He knew what he was doing. So... Wood Stick.
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Old 05-19-21, 04:07 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by Bob Ross View Post
Here's something else I remember about Woodstock ...or a tangental Woodstock-related memory at least:

When I was ~10 or 11 years old -- so this would be circa 1971 -- my aunt & uncle gave me a half dozen paperback books for my birthday, all about rock music. (Clearly my Mom & Dad had told them that I'd developed a budding interest in music, and rock music in particular.) I remember that one of those books was Lillian Roxon's Rock Encyclopedia, and one was Richard Goldstein's The Poetry Of Rock, and another one was something by Nat Hentoff (I think; can't find anything in his bibliography that sounds familiar though). Anyhow, one of those paperback books was mostly record reviews, and it contained a chapter called The Record Review As Fiction. And while it was ostensibly (and very obliquely) a review of the Woodstock soundtrack album, it consisted solely of a narrative description of a poser at a party bragging about how he had attended the Woodstock concert, and all the party-goers were asking him questions about events over those three days, and eventually someone who clearly had actually attended the event shut this poser down in as terse and succinct a way as possible, like pure acid character assasination in three words or less...but suddenly everyone at the party realized that the poser had only seen the movie and not been to the event.

Really memorable. Really weird.
Interesting context for a story about a significant event.

I can imagine that some people could convince themselves they had attended a significant event or experienced something they hadn't. I've seen that in my own family and acquaintances. Particularly in one woman who was incredibly agile at confabulation, spinning yarns out of whole cloth and seeming to believe she'd experienced things that I knew she hadn't attended or even witnessed. She co-opted other people's stories and made them her own. Oddly, she seemed to pass that trait on to her eldest daughter. I'm not sure whether it was genetics or the psychological influence, since the daughter was spinning similar yarns that she really believed from the time she could speak.

I remember my mom and aunt telling me that we'd attended the Beatles final concert tour at Shea Stadium in 1966. I have no memory of that. But it seemed plausible. We lived nearby. They often took me places because I was a pretty well behaved kid, not a brat throwing tantrums or getting into mischief. We did attend Mets games, which I clearly remember. (Yankees too, although I wasn't partial to either team -- it was just a great era to be a baseball fan with two great hometown teams.) So if I was there, I missed it anyway. Maybe I fell asleep, since I would have been only 9 years old and hadn't yet developed a taste for rock music. Or maybe mom and auntie misremembered and only thought they'd taken me to the show. Dunno.
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Old 05-19-21, 06:59 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by 79pmooney View Post

My dream wasn't to be at another Woodstock but to go to southside Chicago to a club and see the the blues raw and in person. Sadly the gangs put an end to that dream. I've done the next best, going to Buddy Guy's downtown club. (Buddy Guy wasn't there and I was attending a convention, so the night I could go had no headliners; just local talent I'd never heard of. But still ... The convention was a mile away from the old Chess Records so I went there. Got to play my harmonica in the studio! Met Willie Dixon's grandson.)

Woodstock didn't chanmge my life. But those times sure did.
...we used to sneak into the back alley exits to the Gayety Burlesque theater down on 9th Street in D.C., to try to get a peek at the strippers. I think maybe I was 14 or 15. All the music there on stage was provided by some of the better black blues musicians I've ever heard play. A paying gig is a paying gig.
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Old 05-19-21, 11:44 PM
  #32  
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I got to watch a band from Oakland at the Waterfront Blues Festival two summers ago from the stage-side VIP seating. Sat way back so I was right over the drummer. Band leader was a young man doing Otis Redding covers. Put his heart into it and made the songs his. Band was much older, very good musicians who could probably back just about anything. Drummer knew half the songs really well and had written out charts for the rest. But this was outdoors and the wind blew! His charts wouldn't stay put and of course he didn't have a hand to spare. So he muddled along, actually really well. I'm not sure any of the band noticed.

After their gig, I went on stage to talk to the drummer. Black man in his 40s-50s. This was just a side for him. He had a day job. Was new to this band. Some of the Redding songs were burned into his brain but the singer knew his whole catalogue. Completely without boast, he said he did paid jobs all the time. What I saw watching him play was a real pro who knew how to do what it takes, even when not all goes according to plan. He never got flustered.

And funny, while I watched wind try to thwart him, I thought of my sis-in-law who is a classical french horn player. Very, very good. Teaches, plays in small ensembles. Gets asked to play gigs for events. Is popular with composers because she can sight read so they get to hear the music they just wrote or changed. I was staying with them last time I was back east. She had a wedding to play in a week. Composer, new music, young fellow musicians. Well, at the first rehearsal of the horns, no piano yet, the young men on the other horns all played sharp. My sis knew that when the piano showed up, this was going south fast! So she played on key. At the end of the session, the composed singled her (the only female there like most of her events) for playing flat. She kept her mouth shut; knowing as a woman, speaking up was never going to go well. Next rehearsal, they had the piano. Composer has to lecture the young men to get in tune and (probably grudgingly) admit that my sis had it right last time.

Good pro musicians - they do what they have to to make good music. And the audience rarely knows what went into it! And I feel some of the same blood in that black, very likely blue collar musician from Oakland and the white classical musician living quiet comfortable life in Amherst MA. (My sis liked that story of the drummer!) To your point, there are so many really good musicians in this world! So many we have never heard of.
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Old 05-20-21, 12:42 AM
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i remember he was cute, yellow, fuzzy, and had a funny laugh. and, he was snoopy's best friend
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Old 05-20-21, 08:52 AM
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The only thing that I know about Woodstock 69 was just from the magazine articles from the time and news articles since then, and I have yet to see the movie. In looking at pictures from that particular event, it would seem that one would need to consume a considerable amount of drugs to say that they had a good time, since it looked miserable to get, be, and leave there.
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Old 05-20-21, 09:15 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by roundypndr View Post
The only thing that I know about Woodstock 69 was just from the magazine articles from the time and news articles since then, and I have yet to see the movie. In looking at pictures from that particular event, it would seem that one would need to consume a considerable amount of drugs to say that they had a good time, since it looked miserable to get, be, and leave there.
Lets not forget that we had no cell phones, personal computers, no electronic calculators, and almost NOTHING had pushbuttons. Many of us were lucky to have a color television. Most of us got our media fix from magazines, which we read cover-to-cover several times until they were ragged and dog-eared. Our source of music and entertainment was always the radio. Where I lived, on the island, the only radio station that came in good was a PBS station, which was pure torture to a young person, so we listened to a Boston AM station, which came in pretty good. The signal must have skipped across the water from Boston to us in Maine.

So yeah, stuff like Woodstock WAS a lot of fun to many people who attended because it was something unusual - something extraordinary. Unlike the media junkies of today, it didnt take much to amuse people back then. Gatherings of any kind were big events, and broke the monotony of everyday existence. Just the experience of being at an event like Woodstock must have been so rich in sights sounds and smells. Can you imagine what it would be like if Burning Man had happened back then?
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Old 05-20-21, 10:28 AM
  #36  
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Annnnnd, of course, the biggest irony of all... if you "remember" it, there is a good chance you were not really there, uh, "participating."
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Old 05-20-21, 10:31 AM
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Originally Posted by J.Higgins View Post
Lets not forget that we had no cell phones, personal computers, no electronic calculators, and almost NOTHING had pushbuttons. Many of us were lucky to have a color television. Most of us got our media fix from magazines, which we read cover-to-cover several times until they were ragged and dog-eared. Our source of music and entertainment was always the radio. Where I lived, on the island, the only radio station that came in good was a PBS station, which was pure torture to a young person, so we listened to a Boston AM station, which came in pretty good. The signal must have skipped across the water from Boston to us in Maine.

So yeah, stuff like Woodstock WAS a lot of fun to many people who attended because it was something unusual - something extraordinary. Unlike the media junkies of today, it didnt take much to amuse people back then. Gatherings of any kind were big events, and broke the monotony of everyday existence. Just the experience of being at an event like Woodstock must have been so rich in sights sounds and smells. Can you imagine what it would be like if Burning Man had happened back then?
Keep in mind that by the time of the Woodstock event, we had supposedly landed men on the moon.
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Old 05-20-21, 10:51 AM
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I was more into Little League baseball than Woodstock at 11, but I always paid attention to music on the radio and any media attention given to it. I think the movie Taking Woodstock give a pretty realistic capture of the impact on the locals and the different perceptions people had on it.



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Old 05-20-21, 11:00 AM
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I was only 4 at the time. However, in 2001 I visited the site during a long weekend cycling event. We were based in Port Jervis, NY. The first full day of riding took us to the site. One participant had been involved with the procurement of supplies for the concert. She told the story of how the Hog Farmers demanded to keep cooking supplies (pots and pans) that the concert organizers had rented in return for the Hog Farmers having fed a lot of concert goers for free. The parties eventually reached a settlement. One interesting thing was that the woman wasnt into music at the time, so hadnt paid much attention to the performances.
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Old 05-20-21, 12:41 PM
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Too bad we can't see Neil Young in the movie.

Originally Posted by Deal4Fuji View Post
I think the movie Taking Woodstock give a pretty realistic capture of the impact on the locals and the different perceptions people had on
Ang Lee's film is funny and beautiful, and he perfects the split screen format like the concert film. Dimitri Martin is perfect in the role.
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Old 05-20-21, 12:55 PM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by 79pmooney View Post
My music was already drifting toward the blues when Woodstock happened. Hendrix seemed to me to be from a different planet. Many years later, I realized that man could play the blues with the best and that it was deep in his soul. The musical "experience" of my lifetime was watching Muddy Waters and his southside Chigago band play in a Boston club on a Sunday night that next winter from 9pm to closing at 2. After midnight there were no other customers in the place. I sat mesmorized right in front of Muddy. Lifechanging.

My dream wasn't to be at another Woodstock but to go to southside Chicago to a club and see the the blues raw and in person. Sadly the gangs put an end to that dream. I've done the next best, going to Buddy Guy's downtown club. (Buddy Guy wasn't there and I was attending a convention, so the night I could go had no headliners; just local talent I'd never heard of. But still ... The convention was a mile away from the old Chess Records so I went there. Got to play my harmonica in the studio! Met Willie Dixon's grandson.)

Woodstock didn't chanmge my life. But those times sure did.
I was in the Army in 1969, but did to get go to a Jimi Hendrix concert at the Waikiki Shell, Honolulu on Memorial Day 1969. The crowd was GI's and hippies and everyone thought his performance of the Star Bangled Banner (similar to the performance at Woodstock 3 months later) was perfect and on pitch with the times.

I saw Buddy Guy perform twice in the 60's, both times at The Main Point, a folkie venue in Swarthmore Pa. The first show in the fall of '67 was fantastic, he had the bluesy vocal sound and bluesy licks of BB King as well as the showmanship and fireworks of Jimi Hendrix. He was the whole show as some local band backed him up as best they could. Everybody in the audience was wowed.

The second time I saw him perform at the the Main Point, probably in the Spring of 1968 the folky audience detracted from the performance by making pretend they were the clientele from a southside Chicago blues club, calling out "tell it like it is brother" and similar cliched tropes. Still it was great performance by a great bluesman.
Other blues and R&B acts that I enjoyed in Philadelphia back in the 60's and early 70's were:
Bobby Bland at some night club on Locust Street;
Bo Diddley playing a 2 hour set at a bar in Northeast Phila with a house band. He and his guitar had the exact same fantastic sound and Bo Diddley beat of his 45's.
James Brown and his Famous Flames at the Arena at 46th and Market, Phila sometime in 1967. Super duper!
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Old 05-20-21, 01:21 PM
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Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
I was in the Army in 1969, but did to get go to a Jimi Hendrix concert at the Waikiki Shell, Honolulu on Memorial Day 1969. The crowd was GI's and hippies and everyone thought his performance of the Star Bangled Banner (similar to the performance at Woodstock 3 months later) was perfect and on pitch with the times.

I saw Buddy Guy perform twice in the 60's, both times at The Main Point, a folkie venue in Swarthmore Pa. The first show in the fall of '67 was fantastic, he had the bluesy vocal sound and bluesy licks of BB King as well as the showmanship and fireworks of Jimi Hendrix. He was the whole show as some local band backed him up as best they could. Everybody in the audience was wowed.

The second time I saw him perform at the the Main Point, probably in the Spring of 1968 the folky audience detracted from the performance by making pretend they were the clientele from a southside Chicago blues club, calling out "tell it like it is brother" and similar cliched tropes. Still it was great performance by a great bluesman.
Other blues and R&B acts that I enjoyed in Philadelphia back in the 60's and early 70's were:
Bobby Bland at some night club on Locust Street;
Bo Diddley playing a 2 hour set at a bar in Northeast Phila with a house band. He and his guitar had the exact same fantastic sound and Bo Diddley beat of his 45's.
James Brown and his Famous Flames at the Arena at 46th and Market, Phila sometime in 1967. Super duper!
I saw Buddy Guy with Junior Wells at a smallish club in Boston, 1973. Being a harp player, I was there to see Junior Wells. That night, he was on fire. I didn't notice a single note Buddy Guy played. Wells beingf so on fire meant that the band behind him had to be A1 first class. I just oblivious. The most intense set of music I've ever experienced.

The jaw dropping guitar show I got to witness was one of the last of Luther Allison's life. (He came up through the southern Chicago blues scene with Buddy Guy but spent decades in Europe where he was respected, loved and paid.)
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Old 05-20-21, 01:32 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by J.Higgins View Post
I remember watching bits and pieces of it on television. I remember seeing artists who were there, appearing on Dick Cavett.

It was all peace love dove, brotherhood of Man, good feelings, peace symbols, and Neru jackets. Most of which I only dreamed about. My Dad would fly into a rage at the sight of that stuff on television, calling it a load of useless *****, and slammed the door on any of my aspirations of becoming a hippie. So needless to say, I stayed at home.

Have any of you Foosters actually been to Woodstock in August 1969?
My not-yet wife and I were hippies. We spent that weekend listening to reporting on WBAI, a non-commercial listener sponsored radio station in NYC. With the rain we were glad we hadn’t gone. Oh, we also were on acid.

When the movie came out we took the kids to see it with us at a drive-in. It rained. At least we had a car so we were dry.

I also lived in the actual Woodstock - the festival took place in Bethel NY, many miles away - where I ran the town print shop. A long, long time ago.

I didn’t own a bike at the time.
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Old 05-20-21, 01:48 PM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by genec View Post
Annnnnd, of course, the biggest irony of all... if you "remember" it, there is a good chance you were not really there, uh, "participating."
Exactly, and that's precisely what this thread has evolved into. I'm actually enjoying the stories that people are sharing about where they were and how they felt about those times. Good stories!

Originally Posted by genec View Post
Keep in mind that by the time of the Woodstock event, we had supposedly landed men on the moon.
Pretty amazing when you think about it. Most of the simpler calculations were still being done with slide rules. Brave people with a dream.

Originally Posted by Deal4Fuji View Post
I was more into Little League baseball than Woodstock at 11, but I always paid attention to music on the radio and any media attention given to it. I think the movie Taking Woodstock give a pretty realistic capture of the impact on the locals and the different perceptions people had on it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I5DXIs1z2zQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IN5zv7oMwwg
I've never even heard of this movie! WoWee! I'll have to watch it now. Thanks!
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Old 05-20-21, 09:24 PM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by J.Higgins View Post
Can you imagine what it would be like if Burning Man had happened back then?
less make-up and a little more skin?
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Old 05-21-21, 01:07 PM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by J.Higgins View Post
Thanks for sharing. These are the types of stories I like to hear. Woodstock obviously impacted the people who were there, but it also impacted and influenced the rest of the world.
There were similar things going on in Europe at that time, probably simply because there was a huge young generation after the babyboom that changed the balance of society in favour of those who have the age to like change. And Woodstock was more the result of a movement than the origin. But Woodstock has of course been an example for music festivals and that has proven to be a lasting legacy.

But in general, there are many huge music festivls here in the Netherlands but also in Belgium and as I've heard Germany and Scandinavia too they all still have that flower power spirit and vibe. That has defined music festivals forever, everybody friendly, open to 'other' music and other people, no fighting despite the numbers and the alcohol and drugs. And not just the natural successors, but also the metal, dance and whatever agressive hardcore music festival. The biggest festival here now is a combined music and dirt racing festival with over 200.000 people. It's really a peasants/farmers festival that unapologettically celebrates the country side and it's lack of sophistication, with a kind of rough crowd. But that's also just another Woodstock spin off when it comes to spirit and vibe. Naturally the music tends more to AC/DC than to Ravi Shankar, but there's hiphop, the reggae meadow was one of the earlier additions to the initially small festival (Luckily we've never known black or white music here, it was just American music). Anyway, more than 200.000 equivalents of hillbillies and rednecks drinking heavily for 3 days, many doing coke too, and no fights worth mentioning, just because it's a music festival.

So what authorities feared that would happen with so many young people having fun didn't happen back then and doesn't happen now, and not because they were and are hippies but because people just want to have fun and be nice to eachother, it just took hippies to remind us of that and set the example. Imo that has had a meaning far beyond music festivals in the sense that several generations since Woodstock believe that that's normal, which it is of course, but still. .

I knew Hendrix well before I watched the whole Woodstock film when it was it's 20th anniversary was which included one of Hendrix' best btw. That was after as a 15-year old I lend a lot of records from my neighbours who had been hippies, and had a lot from that time. From Melanie Safka to Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young. Most of it has never become my favourite music, but the freedom and urgency to do something new was still impressive, allthough a bit overshadowed by Hendrix who already was and always remained a favourite. So I'm happy with the generation, I'm grateful to the people that took risks and made it happen, they changed the world for the better a little and that's quite an achievement.
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Old 05-21-21, 11:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Deal4Fuji View Post
I was more into Little League baseball than Woodstock at 11, but I always paid attention to music on the radio and any media attention given to it. I think the movie Taking Woodstock give a pretty realistic capture of the impact on the locals and the different perceptions people had on it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I5DXIs1z2zQ
I found it available for streaming on the Peacock service.
Funniest line from a local so far:

"They're going to be high on drugs, robbing us during the day, and raping our cattle at night!"
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Old 05-21-21, 11:49 PM
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Love Jimi Hendrix the guitar tone trips me out and being cold sober. Timeless music watching the sunrise from the bottom of the sea.
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Old 05-22-21, 12:25 AM
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Over the decades I've cooled a bit on Hendrix, mostly because I was so saturated in his music in my teens that I don't need to hear it again.

Meanwhile I've developed a greater appreciation for other bands at Woodstock. At the time, in the very early 1970s, many of my friends were into CSN and, later, CSNY. I wasn't at the time. But over the past few years I've given a listen to their work as a group and as solo acts and revised my impressions. I can still take only small doses of Neil Young, Graham Nash and, especially, the increasingly insufferable David Crosby (who's burned every possible bridge with the other members because he's a raging jackass).

But I've come to appreciate the virtuosity and versatility of Stephen Stills. I only knew him from a handful of songs that got radio play. But my jogging/walking playlist includes quite a bit of Stills solo work and with Manassas. Manassas may have been one of the very few supergroups that really lived up to the hype. I finally realized that with few exceptions, CSN was mostly Stephen Stills, with a few contributions from the other guys. And the songs contributed by Crosby and Nash haven't worn well, while Stills' work is timeless.

That was a pleasant surprise, after dragging myself out of the familiarity of Hendrix, Santana and others.
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Old 05-22-21, 05:45 AM
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Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
Over the decades I've cooled a bit on Hendrix, mostly because I was so saturated in his music in my teens that I don't need to hear it again.

Meanwhile I've developed a greater appreciation for other bands at Woodstock. At the time, in the very early 1970s, many of my friends were into CSN and, later, CSNY. I wasn't at the time. But over the past few years I've given a listen to their work as a group and as solo acts and revised my impressions. I can still take only small doses of Neil Young, Graham Nash and, especially, the increasingly insufferable David Crosby (who's burned every possible bridge with the other members because he's a raging jackass).

But I've come to appreciate the virtuosity and versatility of Stephen Stills. I only knew him from a handful of songs that got radio play. But my jogging/walking playlist includes quite a bit of Stills solo work and with Manassas. Manassas may have been one of the very few supergroups that really lived up to the hype. I finally realized that with few exceptions, CSN was mostly Stephen Stills, with a few contributions from the other guys. And the songs contributed by Crosby and Nash haven't worn well, while Stills' work is timeless.

That was a pleasant surprise, after dragging myself out of the familiarity of Hendrix, Santana and others.
I enjoyed reading your personal assessment of CSN(Y), Cank!

My feelings about Crosby mirror yours. He's a very talented individual who did whatever he bloody well wanted, regardless of anyone else's feelings. If a clinical psychologist ran a series of tests on him, I would not be surprised that he could be diagnosed with mild psychopathy spectrum. Our paradigms about psychopathy typically include Norman Bates shower scenes, but take a minute to realize that most people don't know that psychopathy is much more common than you think. Real psychopathy is characterized by boldness, lack of empathy to others, and egotistical traits, then Crosby's behavior would make sense. He did whatever he wanted, whenever he wanted, and with whomever he wanted, and alienated everyone who cared about him along the way. If mental health diagnosis and treatment was as advanced then as it is now, he could have gotten some help and may not have needed to take as many drugs as he did.
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