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SAS shoes for riding in the rain

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SAS shoes for riding in the rain

Old 07-29-21, 11:13 AM
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ciclista_pazza
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SAS shoes for riding in the rain

I recently developed Morton's Neuroma, which is a painful condition that makes walking painful without the right shoes, inserts, etc. The only shoes I can wear these days that don't hurt my feet are SAS shoes. I've seen some mention of these shoes on this site by other cyclists and was wondering if those who wear them while biking could tell me how they do in the rain and how they do generally with biking. The shoes are unfortunately pretty expensive, and so far I can't bring myself to wear them in the rain and am wearing my rain shoes for now. My rain shoes don't hurt my feet too much since there's not much support, but I don't like the idea of wearing them regularly for cycling and worry they will wear down before long.

In Arizona, we get an annual monsoon season where there is generally a period of torrential rain each afternoon, so this is pretty intense rain I'll be riding in during the summers. I've tried asking on sites like Amazon or Zappos for feedback, and most customers said the SAS shoes do well in the rain, but I'm not sure those people wear them in the conditions that regular cyclists encounter on a daily basis. Any feedback from those who ride in SAS shoes would be appreciated.

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Old 07-29-21, 03:28 PM
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Could you wear galoshes over the shoes, something like this: Amazon.com : Nirohee Silicone Shoes Covers, Shoe Covers, Rain Boots Reusable Easy to Carry for Women, Men, Kids. (Gray, M) : Sports & Outdoors
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Old 07-29-21, 07:34 PM
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Originally Posted by ciclista_pazza View Post
. , but I'm not sure those people wear them in the conditions that regular cyclists encounter on a daily basis. Any feedback from those who ride in SAS shoes would be appreciated.
I don't think regular cyclists ride in the rain, unless commuting when there's no choice. My experience in New Mexico was the rains arrived typically around 11AM and I'd plan my rides to be done before then. It avoided the heat as well. Why not ride earlier and avoided the rain, then there's no issue as to how the shoes hold up when wet.
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Old 07-29-21, 10:31 PM
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Is there something unique about SAS shoes that makes them suitable for Morton's Neuroma? I have several foot issues (very narrow, bony feet with high arches, plantar fasciitis, metatarsal pain, etc.) but get by with some commonly available shoes from Adidas, Under Armour and a small independent running shoe company in Austin, Atreyu.

Some advisers suggest low drop or zero drop shoes for Morton's Neuroma. Most running shoes have a heel/toe drop of around 10mm. That includes most of my Adidas and Under Armour shoes. Atreyu's basic model has 6mm drop and the thickest, plushest insole I've seen as original equipment, about 5mm and very comfortable. With most shoes -- running, walking and cycling -- I replace the original insoles with ProFoot Miracle insoles, by far the best aftermarket insole I've tried. But after a break-in period, during which I used the ProFoot Miracle insoles in addition to the Atreyu original insole, I'm now just using the Atreyu insole. That was partly because I only resumed jogging around January and it took a few months to strengthen and toughen my feet to the point I no longer needed extra arch support and cushioning for the metatarsals and heels.

If there's a Ross, Marshalls or comparable discounter near you, they often carry very good quality shoes for around $15-$35 from Adidas, Under Armour, Nike, Reebok, Puma, Brooks and others. These are usually discontinued, new/old stock that's a year to three years old, but brand new, often in original packaging. I try them on in the store to be sure they'll work for me. Occasionally I'll buy online but it's very hit or miss so I prefer to try shoes in person.

I did buy the Atreyu online since that's the only way to buy them. At $75 for a single pair it was a reasonable risk based on the mostly positive reviews. They look a bit like old school Keds or Converse, but tweaked to be suitable for running. Very lightweight, around 6 oz each. My main criticism is they're too wide for me, but it's hard to find shoes that fit my A/B width feet right out of the box. Since the Atreyus are soft running shoes, I only needed to lace them up more snugly to fit. They'd be fine for anyone with normal feet, around C or D width.

The other problem was some pressure on the cuboid on my left foot. The stock Atreyu footbed and insole put slightly too much pressure on the lateral/outer edge of my midfoot, causing some tenderness on the cuboid, the little rounded projection just beside the ankle. I pulled out the Atreyu insole (gently, it's partially secured by detachable adhesive) and carefully trimmed the outer edge in a slight arc shape, a little at a time, trying the shoe between trimmings. After trimming a bit, I've gone about 75 miles of walking and jogging with no problems. Again, that's just a quirk of my feet, not a fault with the Atreyu shoe.

Another reason I keep mentioning the Atreyu is that, besides being a good shoe for running, jogging and walking, it turned out to be a very good casual cycling shoe with the iSSi Thump platform pedals on my hybrid. Very grippy. The Atreyu sole ins't as firm as, say, the Five Ten Freeriders, but is dense and resilient enough to provide adequate support. I don't feel the protruding grip pins on the pedals through the shoes.
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Old 07-30-21, 09:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
I don't think regular cyclists ride in the rain, unless commuting when there's no choice. My experience in New Mexico was the rains arrived typically around 11AM and I'd plan my rides to be done before then. It avoided the heat as well. Why not ride earlier and avoided the rain, then there's no issue as to how the shoes hold up when wet.
I don't have a vehicle and I commute to work every day, so avoiding the rain is not an option. I live in Tucson and my experience during monsoon season is the rains arrive in the late afternoon, usually on my commute home. I wish I could set my own hours for work but don't have that luxury. Would be nice though!

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Old 07-30-21, 09:21 AM
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Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
Is there something unique about SAS shoes that makes them suitable for Morton's Neuroma? I have several foot issues (very narrow, bony feet with high arches, plantar fasciitis, metatarsal pain, etc.) but get by with some commonly available shoes from Adidas, Under Armour and a small independent running shoe company in Austin, Atreyu.

Some advisers suggest low drop or zero drop shoes for Morton's Neuroma. Most running shoes have a heel/toe drop of around 10mm. That includes most of my Adidas and Under Armour shoes. Atreyu's basic model has 6mm drop and the thickest, plushest insole I've seen as original equipment, about 5mm and very comfortable. With most shoes -- running, walking and cycling -- I replace the original insoles with ProFoot Miracle insoles, by far the best aftermarket insole I've tried. But after a break-in period, during which I used the ProFoot Miracle insoles in addition to the Atreyu original insole, I'm now just using the Atreyu insole. That was partly because I only resumed jogging around January and it took a few months to strengthen and toughen my feet to the point I no longer needed extra arch support and cushioning for the metatarsals and heels.

If there's a Ross, Marshalls or comparable discounter near you, they often carry very good quality shoes for around $15-$35 from Adidas, Under Armour, Nike, Reebok, Puma, Brooks and others. These are usually discontinued, new/old stock that's a year to three years old, but brand new, often in original packaging. I try them on in the store to be sure they'll work for me. Occasionally I'll buy online but it's very hit or miss so I prefer to try shoes in person.

I did buy the Atreyu online since that's the only way to buy them. At $75 for a single pair it was a reasonable risk based on the mostly positive reviews. They look a bit like old school Keds or Converse, but tweaked to be suitable for running. Very lightweight, around 6 oz each. My main criticism is they're too wide for me, but it's hard to find shoes that fit my A/B width feet right out of the box. Since the Atreyus are soft running shoes, I only needed to lace them up more snugly to fit. They'd be fine for anyone with normal feet, around C or D width.

The other problem was some pressure on the cuboid on my left foot. The stock Atreyu footbed and insole put slightly too much pressure on the lateral/outer edge of my midfoot, causing some tenderness on the cuboid, the little rounded projection just beside the ankle. I pulled out the Atreyu insole (gently, it's partially secured by detachable adhesive) and carefully trimmed the outer edge in a slight arc shape, a little at a time, trying the shoe between trimmings. After trimming a bit, I've gone about 75 miles of walking and jogging with no problems. Again, that's just a quirk of my feet, not a fault with the Atreyu shoe.

Another reason I keep mentioning the Atreyu is that, besides being a good shoe for running, jogging and walking, it turned out to be a very good casual cycling shoe with the iSSi Thump platform pedals on my hybrid. Very grippy. The Atreyu sole ins't as firm as, say, the Five Ten Freeriders, but is dense and resilient enough to provide adequate support. I don't feel the protruding grip pins on the pedals through the shoes.

Thanks! I should have mentioned that I have extremely wide feet. I'm female but I actually needed to order a men's triple wide shoe at SAS as no other shoes in women's or men's sizes worked for me and I tried countless options. My previous shoes being too narrow was part of what led to my developing Morton's Neuroma in the first place. So insanely expensive shoes are it for me now.
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Old 07-30-21, 04:27 PM
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If SAS casual/athletic shoes are made like most, they should be fine in the rain. I wash my running shoes -- Adidas, Under Armour, etc. -- by dunking them in a bucket of cool/lukewarm water with ordinary laundry soap. Soak for awhile, sponge off or scrub as necessary, air dry. No problems. I wouldn't use hot water or a hot air dryer, though.

And my clipless cycling shoes have been soaked in heavy rain a few times. No problems. While they look like leather, they're all synthetic materials.
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Old 07-30-21, 04:53 PM
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Originally Posted by ciclista_pazza View Post
I don't have a vehicle and I commute to work every day, so avoiding the rain is not an option. I live in Tucson and my experience during monsoon season is the rains arrive in the late afternoon, usually on my commute home. I wish I could set my own hours for work but don't have that luxury. Would be nice though!
I suffer from "hot foot" which is a Neuroma under the point where the small toe meets the metatarsal. My podiatrist tells me it's mostly due to stretching of the assorted ligaments and tendons that comes with age, thus there's less support provided for the middle of the foot, I will on occasion use inserts that support the foot, but also have migrated to a shoe that has a stiff midsole, carbon Shimano SH-XC-7's in this case. Thus better support in the middle of the foot. If I were commuting and got wet regularly, I might end up with 2 pairs of shoes, wear one pair while the other dry's out.
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Old 07-30-21, 05:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
I suffer from "hot foot" which is a Neuroma under the point where the small toe meets the metatarsal. My podiatrist tells me it's mostly due to stretching of the assorted ligaments and tendons that comes with age, thus there's less support provided for the middle of the foot, I will on occasion use inserts that support the foot, but also have migrated to a shoe that has a stiff midsole, carbon Shimano SH-XC-7's in this case. Thus better support in the middle of the foot. If I were commuting and got wet regularly, I might end up with 2 pairs of shoes, wear one pair while the other dry's out.
Thanks! For me, the issue is not so much the shoes getting wet, which I know will happen and I'm ok with alternating with the rain shoes later in the day if I need to, but I'm worried the expensive SAS shoes won't hold up to getting wet all the time since they are fancy pants orthotic shoes Just curious if other people on this site have experience with this particular shoe and riding when it rains. I've seen people on this forum mention that they wear those shoes biking but I haven't seen anything about how they do in the rain. Since they cost a fortune, I just wanted to see if anyone can give me some tips before I take the plunge. If they will be destroyed by rain, I'll try to just continue to use the rain shoes during Arizona's monsoon season and try to avoid any riding in the rain with the SAS shoes.
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Old 07-31-21, 11:50 AM
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I've been using SAS shoes for a while, as I have foot issues from a series of surgeries when I was young and a rather nasty accident and complications a decade or so ago. They've been the only ones I've found that come in wide enough sizes and give enough support.

Since getting back to riding I've mainly used an older pair of Move Ons, especially in wet and cold weather, as they have fairly flat bottom soles and not much venting. They've worked decently well--I wear warm socks when it's cold--but I don't have much for comparison. They stay a bit drier without vent holes, but when water gets in around the foot it stays there. I got caught in a heavy downpour a few weeks ago and felt water sloshing around in the shoes.

I mainly wear a set of Journeys for daily wear and ride a lot in them. They're more like traditional sneakers, with vents and a more treaded bottom. They work fairly well. The sole doesn't grab the pedal spikes as well, and they're cooler, but water at least has a way to escape.

I used to wear 'Bout Times, which were a lot like the Move Ons, but not since I've gotten back to riding.

Wish I could offer more, but I hope that helps a bit.
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Old 08-03-21, 09:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Sertsa View Post
I've been using SAS shoes for a while, as I have foot issues from a series of surgeries when I was young and a rather nasty accident and complications a decade or so ago. They've been the only ones I've found that come in wide enough sizes and give enough support.

Since getting back to riding I've mainly used an older pair of Move Ons, especially in wet and cold weather, as they have fairly flat bottom soles and not much venting. They've worked decently well--I wear warm socks when it's cold--but I don't have much for comparison. They stay a bit drier without vent holes, but when water gets in around the foot it stays there. I got caught in a heavy downpour a few weeks ago and felt water sloshing around in the shoes.

I mainly wear a set of Journeys for daily wear and ride a lot in them. They're more like traditional sneakers, with vents and a more treaded bottom. They work fairly well. The sole doesn't grab the pedal spikes as well, and they're cooler, but water at least has a way to escape.

I used to wear 'Bout Times, which were a lot like the Move Ons, but not since I've gotten back to riding.

Wish I could offer more, but I hope that helps a bit.
Thanks very much! This is helpful. Sorry not to reply sooner - didn't see this response.
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Old 08-03-21, 09:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Sertsa View Post
I've been using SAS shoes for a while, as I have foot issues from a series of surgeries when I was young and a rather nasty accident and complications a decade or so ago. They've been the only ones I've found that come in wide enough sizes and give enough support.

Since getting back to riding I've mainly used an older pair of Move Ons, especially in wet and cold weather, as they have fairly flat bottom soles and not much venting. They've worked decently well--I wear warm socks when it's cold--but I don't have much for comparison. They stay a bit drier without vent holes, but when water gets in around the foot it stays there. I got caught in a heavy downpour a few weeks ago and felt water sloshing around in the shoes.

I mainly wear a set of Journeys for daily wear and ride a lot in them. They're more like traditional sneakers, with vents and a more treaded bottom. They work fairly well. The sole doesn't grab the pedal spikes as well, and they're cooler, but water at least has a way to escape.

I used to wear 'Bout Times, which were a lot like the Move Ons, but not since I've gotten back to riding.

Wish I could offer more, but I hope that helps a bit.
Sorry - I meant to ask - how have the SAS Move On shoes done after the rain? Do you notice the SAS shoes breaking down with exposure to rain?
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Old 08-03-21, 12:05 PM
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Originally Posted by ciclista_pazza View Post
Sorry - I meant to ask - how have the SAS Move On shoes done after the rain? Do you notice the SAS shoes breaking down with exposure to rain?
After drying out they were fine. I haven't noticed any breaking down after getting wet, and I've worn then in snow and rain quite a bit. There's some patina on the brass eyelets on one pair, but they're fairly old and have been through a lot.
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Old 08-03-21, 12:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Sertsa View Post
After drying out they were fine. I haven't noticed any breaking down after getting wet, and I've worn then in snow and rain quite a bit. There's some patina on the brass eyelets on one pair, but they're fairly old and have been through a lot.
Thank you! That's extremely helpful to know.
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Old 08-03-21, 12:53 PM
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sounds like a shoe cover over your favorite shoe tucked under rain pants would be the easiest solution. I've experimented with these options & can share specifics but not sure if that is necessary. what size shoe do you wear? how long is your commute? do you work every day?
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