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Trek Bike- help. New to Cycling

Old 06-17-22, 11:03 AM
  #1  
ITA92
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Trek Bike- help. New to Cycling

Hello,

I am just getting into cycling and got an opportunity to get a 2021 TREK Edmonda in a 56 cm. However when doing a size fit on the Trek website, it痴 says I知 a 58cm, but if I drop my inside leg by a cm it then says I知 a 56cm.

really could do with any advice if a 56cm would be okay, or should I go for a 58?

thanks

Ian
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Old 06-17-22, 11:45 AM
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No one can answer this for you over the internet.

If you're buying at a shop, ask them to do a bike fit; if it's a private party sale, take along a knowledgeable friend who can judge the fit.
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Old 06-17-22, 11:52 AM
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Originally Posted by ITA92 View Post
Hello,

I am just getting into cycling and got an opportunity to get a 2021 TREK Edmonda in a 56 cm. However when doing a size fit on the Trek website, it痴 says I知 a 58cm, but if I drop my inside leg by a cm it then says I知 a 56cm.

really could do with any advice if a 56cm would be okay, or should I go for a 58?

thanks

Ian
A bike that price you'd definitely need to be riding it for a test ride, on pavement or on a trainer, to see how it fits. Like the other poster said, bring a friend who "knows" to judge the fit.

Generally fit charts show "overlap" between the bike sizes based on your height or inseam. When you say it drops a size with one centimeter less, do you mean you go from "no overlap" to "overlap" on the sizes on the fit chart? Or is it already overlapping the 56/58 and the cm less makes it totally into the 56 size?
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Old 06-17-22, 01:13 PM
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Some if not many people can ride several different sizes of bike comfortably. I'd go for the size on the lower end. But the real way to figure it out is to ride both size frames for 10 miles or better. Then you'll have a real good idea which is best. Doesn't have to be the exact tier level bike you want, but it does need to be the same brand and year model frame.

Parking lot trials don't work quite as well. You just don't get the same experience nor time in the saddle.

If you can't test ride the bike and you have to buy it there, then trust the shop sales person to do you right. They do after all want your repeat business... I hope. Maybe get all the shop people to give you an opinion.
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Old 06-17-22, 01:38 PM
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FWIW, it's a lot easier to make a slightly too-small frame fit bigger with a longer stem and seat post than the other way around.
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Old 06-17-22, 02:42 PM
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Inside Leg

FYI Inside leg for a bicycle is measured differently than for pants.

Basic story is a thin book against a wall and pulled up into groin as if it were a bike seat (try google for lots of How To's)
Then measure to the top of the book.

Barry
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Old 06-18-22, 09:01 AM
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I'm 6 feet even and ride an Emonda in size 56. I could ride a 58 but prefer the smaller of the 2.
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Old 06-18-22, 10:07 AM
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Ig you're new to cycling, then you probably shouldn't be looking at the likes of the Emonda just yet. If you're absolutely, positively adamant that it's a road bike that you see yourself on, perhaps you should kick things off with a Domane. Ideally, though, you should really ditch road bikes altogether at this early stage and figure things out on an FX - better yet, get a folding bike with a highly adjustable seatpost abd and handlepost; the wide range of easy adjustability will help you figure out what works best for you, and only then should you consider moving on to better things, such as a proper road bike (or not.)
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Old 06-18-22, 10:09 PM
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Originally Posted by sjanzeir View Post
Ig you're new to cycling, then you probably shouldn't be looking at the likes of the Emonda just yet. If you're absolutely, positively adamant that it's a road bike that you see yourself on, perhaps you should kick things off with a Domane. Ideally, though, you should really ditch road bikes altogether at this early stage and figure things out on an FX - better yet, get a folding bike with a highly adjustable seatpost abd and handlepost; the wide range of easy adjustability will help you figure out what works best for you, and only then should you consider moving on to better things, s
uch as a proper road bike (or not.)
That's an interesting digressing paragraph of advice.
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Old 06-18-22, 10:20 PM
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sjanzeir
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Originally Posted by Outrider1 View Post
That's an interesting digressing paragraph of advice.
But you digress.
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Old 06-20-22, 11:55 PM
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I am 511 (down from 6 over the years). I have a 58cm Domane and a 56cm Madone. Both work well for me, but I would probably go with 56cm for future bikes.

Mike
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Old 06-21-22, 01:19 AM
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Originally Posted by caloso View Post
FWIW, it's a lot easier to make a slightly too-small frame fit bigger with a longer stem and seat post than the other way around.
No, not really. Depends on if you are looking for a more relaxed or more aggressive fit.

The most difficult thing to adjust is the saddle-handlebar drop. To me, the major limiting factor - whether small or large - is head tube length. Let's say you go with the smaller frame option. You can only adjust the handlebars upwards about 30-40mm. So a short head tube might limit you there. Sure you can adjust the smaller bike's saddle upwards quite a bit, and the reach quite a bit with a longer stem. But unless you're willing to use a steep upward angled stem, you're out of luck if you need to raise the handlebars.

Same thing holds for the larger frame option. You can lower the seat quite a bit, and go pretty short with the stem. But if you want an aggressive position, there's only so far you can drop the stem downwards. Again, it's head tube length, not saddle height or stem length that's the limiting factor.

I personally prefer the larger option if between two, as do many (most?) non-racers who don't want a really aggressive low handlebar position. People who prefer lower handlebars, of course, the opposite.

But it's not true that the smaller frame is always the more adjustable option.
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