Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Framebuilders
Reload this Page >

MIG Welding A Frame

Notices
Framebuilders Thinking about a custom frame? Lugged vs Fillet Brazed. Different Frame materials? Newvex or Pacenti Lugs? why get a custom Road, Mountain, or Track Frame? Got a question about framebuilding? Lets discuss framebuilding at it's finest.

MIG Welding A Frame

Old 03-24-10, 06:58 PM
  #1  
PistaRider311
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
PistaRider311's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: slo, ca
Posts: 207

Bikes: Bianchi Pista, Schwinn Varsity (fixed), Mongoose Dirt Jumper.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
MIG Welding A Frame

Hey. First post in framebuilding. I'm going to be building a steel frame with the framebuilding club at my school (Cal Poly SLO). I've been MIG welding for about 10 years (I'm plenty good, and have welded plenty of thin material), and I'm wondering if I can MIG weld a regular diamond frame rather than TIG weld it. I have literally zero TIG welding experience and would rather not learn, though it is possible, if I want to put in the time (I have access to my school's TIG welders).

If it is ok to MIG the frames, how thick does the tubing have to be?

Any other tips are gladly welcome. Thanks in advance.
PistaRider311 is offline  
Old 03-24-10, 07:24 PM
  #2  
artimus
Senior Member
 
artimus's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: The Darkside......
Posts: 219

Bikes: 2001-Brodie Spark, 2005-Trek 2200

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The short answer is no. There is not enough control of filler and heat with a MIG welder. Seeings how you have the TIG equipment handy, learn to use it, you won't regret it.
artimus is offline  
Old 03-25-10, 02:49 AM
  #3  
rodar y rodar
weirdo
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Reno, NV
Posts: 1,962
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Here`s an ancient thread about MIG and bike frames. Some info might be outdated since it`s been a good three days since anybody posted to it.

https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...and-Head-tubes
rodar y rodar is offline  
Likes For rodar y rodar:
Old 03-25-10, 12:15 PM
  #4  
unterhausen
Randomhead
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Happy Valley, Pennsylvania
Posts: 22,014
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 1,625 Times in 1,167 Posts
made me laugh
unterhausen is offline  
Old 03-25-10, 07:30 PM
  #5  
rodar y rodar
weirdo
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Reno, NV
Posts: 1,962
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Yeah, sarcasm is usually fun, but I try to keep it at bay because I usually feel bad later- especially with no practical way of searching back posts any more.

Pista, I`d say that if MIG is what you have available, you may as well get some cheap materials and give it a shot. Hopefully you`ll glean something ot of that thread, even if it`s mostly links to other sites. I know it doesn`t specifically give the info you were asking about, but as you`ve undoubtedly noticed, there just isn`t a whole lot of MIGging going on in the steel bike world, so some imagination, experimenting, and guesswork will be needed.
rodar y rodar is offline  
Old 03-26-10, 10:59 AM
  #6  
PistaRider311
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
PistaRider311's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: slo, ca
Posts: 207

Bikes: Bianchi Pista, Schwinn Varsity (fixed), Mongoose Dirt Jumper.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanks for an actual answer with some information. What's the downside to MIGging frames? I've done plenty of thin wall welding. Does it create too much heat and distort the frame or something?
PistaRider311 is offline  
Old 03-27-10, 11:52 AM
  #7  
PaPa
Senior Member
 
PaPa's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Idaho
Posts: 496
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by PistaRider311 View Post
What's the downside to MIGging frames? I've done plenty of thin wall welding. Does it create too much heat and distort the frame or something?
Against my better judgment, I'm gonna respond. Please bare-in-mind, that this repetitive "welding thinwall with MIG" Q&A is starting to grind on me a little - especially when those asking claim, "no problems welding thin wall", but turn right around and litter forums by asking if they can.

To be crystal clear, it isn't usually the MIG, in-and-of-itself that's the problem - it is the human under the hood that ultimately bares the responsibility of success. There is exceptions of course, but generally speaking, there's nothing wrong with using a quality MIG on bike frames... providing you can consistently prevail the elevated complexities of joining thin wall tubing + compound geometries + all position welding.... all at the same time. So in lieu of hammering a keyboard... why not go try it?
PaPa is offline  
Old 03-27-10, 10:24 PM
  #8  
Nessism
Senior Member
 
Nessism's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 2,993

Bikes: Homebuilt steel

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 601 Post(s)
Liked 145 Times in 114 Posts
My first custom build frame was made by a guy named John Waite that MIG'd lots of frames together. This was in the early 90's and he typically used SLX which is .9 on the butted ends. As long as you don't go too thin on the tubes I'm sure you can build yourself a perfectly serviceable frame with MIG.
Nessism is offline  
Likes For Nessism:
Old 03-28-10, 12:57 PM
  #9  
NoReg
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 5,115
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
One problem you can't escape with MIG is cold starts. With MIG a lot of stuff is happening at the same time and is automated, which is why it is so fast. So the arc forms off the filler metal which immediately is advanced into the forming pool. If one is repairing sheet metal that is largely aesthetic aero in nature, then the fact that there is a tiny portion of the weld that is less that perfect is unlikely to be an issue. With high end structural work, like bikes and airframes, this isn't acceptable. With GAS welding or TIG, the torch heats the puddle to max penetration depth, and full liquid state before the filler is advanced into the puddle. So this problem with MIG does not exist.

The proper sequence with bike welding is likely to involve 4 tacks and 4 starts, that means 8 areas in the tube where the welding heat may not be perfect (and there is little likelihood that it is perfect as the process progresses either, since there is no independent control throughout). Overwelding the tacks is a whole other nightmare...

With MIG robotic welding of bikes, I can imagine that they might program the process to control the heat, and they could theoretically overcome the start-up heat, or minimize the starts and stops required. I don't know how they actually do it but process control is at least theoretically possible.

If you are flux shielding your MIG welds, not gas shielding them, then there are a series of other problems to deal with.

Obviously MIG is not suitable to custom bike making, but whether one can skate by on a home project for the fun of it is a different mater.
NoReg is offline  
Old 03-28-10, 07:25 PM
  #10  
unterhausen
Randomhead
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Happy Valley, Pennsylvania
Posts: 22,014
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 1,625 Times in 1,167 Posts
Distortion is a real problem with any process. But the real issue about asking this question in this forum is that nobody that posts here on a regular basis uses MIG on bike frames. So we're all just speculating. My way of thinking is that if there were any merit to using MIG on bike frames, people would be doing it. But I'll be the first to admit joining methods are subject to non-technical prejudices.
unterhausen is offline  
Likes For unterhausen:
Old 03-29-10, 10:20 PM
  #11  
PistaRider311
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
PistaRider311's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: slo, ca
Posts: 207

Bikes: Bianchi Pista, Schwinn Varsity (fixed), Mongoose Dirt Jumper.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by PaPa View Post
Against my better judgment, I'm gonna respond. Please bare-in-mind, that this repetitive "welding thinwall with MIG" Q&A is starting to grind on me a little - especially when those asking claim, "no problems welding thin wall", but turn right around and litter forums by asking if they can.

To be crystal clear, it isn't usually the MIG, in-and-of-itself that's the problem - it is the human under the hood that ultimately bares the responsibility of success. There is exceptions of course, but generally speaking, there's nothing wrong with using a quality MIG on bike frames... providing you can consistently prevail the elevated complexities of joining thin wall tubing + compound geometries + all position welding.... all at the same time. So in lieu of hammering a keyboard... why not go try it?
Thanks for the backhanded attempt at help.

Originally Posted by Nessism View Post
My first custom build frame was made by a guy named John Waite that MIG'd lots of frames together. This was in the early 90's and he typically used SLX which is .9 on the butted ends. As long as you don't go too thin on the tubes I'm sure you can build yourself a perfectly serviceable frame with MIG.
Originally Posted by Peterpan1 View Post
One problem you can't escape with MIG is cold starts. With MIG a lot of stuff is happening at the same time and is automated, which is why it is so fast. So the arc forms off the filler metal which immediately is advanced into the forming pool. If one is repairing sheet metal that is largely aesthetic aero in nature, then the fact that there is a tiny portion of the weld that is less that perfect is unlikely to be an issue. With high end structural work, like bikes and airframes, this isn't acceptable. With GAS welding or TIG, the torch heats the puddle to max penetration depth, and full liquid state before the filler is advanced into the puddle. So this problem with MIG does not exist.

The proper sequence with bike welding is likely to involve 4 tacks and 4 starts, that means 8 areas in the tube where the welding heat may not be perfect (and there is little likelihood that it is perfect as the process progresses either, since there is no independent control throughout). Overwelding the tacks is a whole other nightmare...

With MIG robotic welding of bikes, I can imagine that they might program the process to control the heat, and they could theoretically overcome the start-up heat, or minimize the starts and stops required. I don't know how they actually do it but process control is at least theoretically possible.

If you are flux shielding your MIG welds, not gas shielding them, then there are a series of other problems to deal with.

Obviously MIG is not suitable to custom bike making, but whether one can skate by on a home project for the fun of it is a different mater.
Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
Distortion is a real problem with any process. But the real issue about asking this question in this forum is that nobody that posts here on a regular basis uses MIG on bike frames. So we're all just speculating. My way of thinking is that if there were any merit to using MIG on bike frames, people would be doing it. But I'll be the first to admit joining methods are subject to non-technical prejudices.
Thanks for the information guys. I guess what I was going for when asking this question was personal experience, but no one seems to have ever actually done it themselves (as unterhausen pointed out), so I'm just getting a lot of speculation/guesses/opinion, which is totally cool, because that's all you can give someone when you haven't actually tried it yourself.
PistaRider311 is offline  
Old 03-29-10, 10:40 PM
  #12  
unterhausen
Randomhead
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Happy Valley, Pennsylvania
Posts: 22,014
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 1,625 Times in 1,167 Posts
If you become an expert at it you can come back here and answer questions. I think many people here hate seeing unanswered questions, I know I do.
unterhausen is offline  
Old 03-30-10, 12:42 AM
  #13  
PaPa
Senior Member
 
PaPa's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Idaho
Posts: 496
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
PistaRider311,

I'm genuinely sorry you feel my response was personal... it was NOT. Just to clear the air, take a moment and go back and look at your 'entrance' to the Frame Builders forum.

1. You are a student (or admittedly have access to) not only a variety of welding equipment, but more importantly, access to certified, IN-PERSON instructors.

2. You make it known that you have "10 years experience" welding thin wall. If this were genuinely true (maybe it is, but I don't know that) then .035" shouldn't pose much a problem for you, and therefor you needn't waste your time asking total strangers if you can. So what did the CC instructor say about bike tubes?.. or did you even bother to ask him?

3. You obviously posted prior to doing a search. Had you searched, you would've discovered at least 38 'MIG welding' threads (some more informative than others). But the most disturbing part was, in your apparent haste, you overlooked the most recent thread titled, "MIG welding and Head tubes" - a thread so recent, it was, and still is listed on the first page when you enter the Frame Builders forum. And had you read as far as post #7 in that specific thread, you would've instantly acquired the answer to your initial question.

And then you take offense when some of us get a little cranky.

FYI, I acquired my first AWS, GMAW FC 'cert' in pipe, and shortly after in SMAW on 7018LH (also in pipe) in the fall of 1980 - 'twas a bow-dunk, high school night class in Arlee, Montana (I was not a HS student) and went on to add 8 more AWS 'certs' to my measly list of credentials over the last 29-1/2 years...

But does that imply that I'm an all-knowing expert in MIGing thin wall tube?.... ... absolutely NOT! What it does mean, is that my 29 years under-the-hood blessed me with the wisdom to know when GMAW is suitable.. and when it's not. So in that light, you are correct, I likely don't have the GMAW wisdom you seek because just like the many other talented torches here on BF, I've taken the time to broaden my talents... and learn more efficient and cost effective ways to do it...

Last edited by PaPa; 03-30-10 at 05:50 AM.
PaPa is offline  
Old 03-30-10, 02:20 PM
  #14  
NoReg
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 5,115
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
"Thanks for the information guys. I guess what I was going for when asking this question was personal experience, but no one seems to have ever actually done it themselves (as unterhausen pointed out), so I'm just getting a lot of speculation/guesses/opinion, which is totally cool, because that's all you can give someone when you haven't actually tried it yourself."

It's a little more than that in my case since I have spent at least 5 years trying to build quality bikes in the home shop environment with redneck methods. So I have tried everything from stick welding to.. OK except MIG. For two reasons as regards the latter, have basically had my fun doing it with stick, and I think in individual hands MIG is the least suited.

Also I would point out that while I enjoy speculating as much as the next person, the stuff about cold starts is plain fact, and is why MIG is allowed on certain jobs, and less so on high end structural stuff.

"But the real issue about asking this question in this forum is that nobody that posts here on a regular basis uses MIG on bike frames."

Another issue that bothers me even more is that while these newbie(s are welcome) questions always go into their pant size and what their girlfriend ate for breakfast details, they very rarely give one any real info on what the person is trying to do. They spend a lot of time describing them, and not the job. At least in this case he mentioned tubbing wall size. So OK, I'm sure you can weld with MIG a bike frame with 1/8" walls. In fact, it is pretty obvious from looking at factory stuff that crap welding works fine even with the 35-65 thou tubing welding. The problem is since we don't know the actual details it is hard to speculate and everyone is forced off onto tangents about what is good for the craft or what they did on the summer vacation.


Hey PAPA did they call it GMAW back in the 70s. I hate it when some kind of industry body changes all the letters and adds more without really adding anything to the general understanding. Congrats on the certs!
NoReg is offline  
Old 08-07-14, 01:33 PM
  #15  
PistaRider311
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
PistaRider311's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: slo, ca
Posts: 207

Bikes: Bianchi Pista, Schwinn Varsity (fixed), Mongoose Dirt Jumper.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
To all: I built this frame in 2010 and it is still holding up fine. See thread here for more details. All done using a standard Lincoln MIG welder with Argon shielding gas. Pulse welds only, and I only burned a couple minor holes, easy to patch. This frame has withstood a fair amount of abuse (3-4 foot drops, curb hopping, stairs, etc) with no signs of fatigue stress (welds or tubes). Just FYI.

Rider Weight: 155 lbs
Frame Material: 4130 Aircraft Cro-Moly from Aircraft Spruce (very very highly recommend dealing with these guys)
1.5 x 0.049" Tubing
90 ksi Yield Strength
Safety Factor (worst case loading): 3.0



Attached Images
File Type: jpg
1.jpg (48.9 KB, 352 views)
File Type: jpg
2.jpg (57.7 KB, 357 views)
PistaRider311 is offline  
Likes For PistaRider311:
Old 08-08-14, 11:31 PM
  #16  
MassiveD
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 2,437
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 31 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
You should put some video on youtube. Always nice to have some data points.
MassiveD is offline  
Old 04-08-21, 08:12 AM
  #17  
PistaRider311
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
PistaRider311's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: slo, ca
Posts: 207

Bikes: Bianchi Pista, Schwinn Varsity (fixed), Mongoose Dirt Jumper.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by gam123 View Post
ok
ok
PistaRider311 is offline  
Old 04-08-21, 08:48 AM
  #18  
unterhausen
Randomhead
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Happy Valley, Pennsylvania
Posts: 22,014
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 1,625 Times in 1,167 Posts
You quoted a spammer. How's that frame holding up?

I didn't read through the thread to see if I knew this back in 2010, but some recumbent manufacturers use MIG. I think it's mostly for thick section materials and they use more conventional processes for most of the frame.
unterhausen is offline  
Old 04-08-21, 01:56 PM
  #19  
WVDingo
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
How'd it turn out?

I would also like to know if you wound up MIG on the frame. I've recently go an interest in piddling with building my own frame out of 4130.

I built a Mini Baja buggy for WVU with TIG back in 2009. Knowing what I know now, MIG would have been great for that! Tubing was a mix of .065 and .035. 0.035 is just under 0.9, which is what a lot of your ends are on bottom and top tubes. Strength obviously isn't an issue with MIG. That's used to build rock bouncers. Machine setup is critical.

I got a good laugh out of the theoreticals. I've never welded a bicycle frame but I do deal with welding specification in my job. The good thing about MIG is that you would get less distortion. The most intelligent comment was the guy talking about how much it matters about the guy under the hood. But that's also true with TIG. I have witnessed welders put WAY too much heat into a metal with TIG. Put the work into fitup of the tubes to minimize any gaps. Most of the welds on a bike frame are fillet welds, so penetration isn't much of an issue either.

BTW y'all I've been hobby welding TIG for 20 years now and just started MIG last year with a Titanium 140 from Harbor Freight. Great machine for the home shop. But I'm pretty new to the MTB scene so...
WVDingo is offline  
Old 04-08-21, 04:44 PM
  #20  
guy153
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Posts: 606
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 212 Post(s)
Liked 123 Times in 101 Posts
Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
You quoted a spammer. How's that frame holding up?

I didn't read through the thread to see if I knew this back in 2010, but some recumbent manufacturers use MIG. I think it's mostly for thick section materials and they use more conventional processes for most of the frame.
A lot of low-end Walmart style bikes are MIG welded, sometimes by robots probably. Probably 1mm wall rolled up mild steel tubing.
guy153 is offline  
Old 04-08-21, 05:40 PM
  #21  
unterhausen
Randomhead
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Happy Valley, Pennsylvania
Posts: 22,014
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 1,625 Times in 1,167 Posts
Originally Posted by WVDingo View Post
I would also like to know if you wound up MIG on the frame. I've recently go an interest in piddling with building my own frame out of 4130.
Welcome to the forum. Sorry your post didn't show up right away. You can see his frame above and there is a link to another thread showing it as a bike.


There have to be good reasons why people don't use MIG on thinner tubing. We need someone that was around in the '80s when they first started welding mountain bikes instead of using lugs.
Maybe the issue has been unexamined the whole time because TIG is a lot better looking than MIG. Or maybe it comes down to what people can perform better on joints like those found on a bike frame. You certainly see TIG on a lot of high-end welding outside the bike industry. I don't think motorsports analogies are really very informative. Sure, there are off-road vehicles that are welded together in a very similar way to a bike frame, but they aren't as structurally marginal as a welded bike frame. One would hope.

I think walmart bikes are made from tubing thicker than 1mm, I have been cutting some up to make bike racks and they are incredibly heavy. Even in pieces. Don't drop that head tube on your foot.

Last edited by unterhausen; 04-08-21 at 07:18 PM.
unterhausen is offline  
Old 04-09-21, 02:37 AM
  #22  
guy153
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Posts: 606
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 212 Post(s)
Liked 123 Times in 101 Posts
Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
Welcome to the forum. Sorry your post didn't show up right away. You can see his frame above and there is a link to another thread showing it as a bike.


There have to be good reasons why people don't use MIG on thinner tubing. We need someone that was around in the '80s when they first started welding mountain bikes instead of using lugs.
Maybe the issue has been unexamined the whole time because TIG is a lot better looking than MIG. Or maybe it comes down to what people can perform better on joints like those found on a bike frame. You certainly see TIG on a lot of high-end welding outside the bike industry. I don't think motorsports analogies are really very informative. Sure, there are off-road vehicles that are welded together in a very similar way to a bike frame, but they aren't as structurally marginal as a welded bike frame. One would hope.

I think walmart bikes are made from tubing thicker than 1mm, I have been cutting some up to make bike racks and they are incredibly heavy. Even in pieces. Don't drop that head tube on your foot.
Head tubes are thicker than 1mm even on nice bikes. I'm sure you're right the other tubes are thicker. I'm just going by the "Mistral Tourist" (which was brazed but low end PG tubing with a visible seam) that I turned into the fitting bike. It was 1mm.

As for MIG on thin tubing, in the motorsport world people are generally using at least 1.6mm or 2mm CrMo or 3mm mild steel-- twice as thick as a bike frame. Advice to the OP is to try it and see what happens. If you can get a clean weld on there without blowing holes then move on to some break tests. If you can break your welds they're not good enough.

Some pictures were posted in this thread of a frame made with 0.049" tubing and as you can see he basically did a series of spot welds that weren't even really joined up. I'm sure his bike worked out fine and I don't mean to criticize but you really want a continuous weld.

One difference between the 1980s and now is that some of the higher end welding machines may have got better. They mostly use inverters and have all kinds of clever double-pulse modes and things. I don't have one and don't do MIG (I graduated from flux-core straight to TIG) so I don't know but it may be that some of that stuff can help. Bike building tends to be quite conservative because once you've got good at one of these processes it's a bit of an art and becomes a lot of fun-- I don't know of any other industry that's still brazing things with oxy-acetylene torches! So just because nobody makes nice hand-made frames with MIG doesn't necessarily mean it's not possible.
guy153 is offline  
Old 04-09-21, 07:11 AM
  #23  
unterhausen
Randomhead
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Happy Valley, Pennsylvania
Posts: 22,014
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 1,625 Times in 1,167 Posts
The OP tried it, he posted pictures just a little bit up the thread.

The thread was bumped by a spammer, it's a zombie thread

Bike building tends to be quite conservative because once you've got good at one of these processes it's a bit of an art and becomes a lot of fun-- I don't know of any other industry that's still brazing things with oxy-acetylene torches! So just because nobody makes nice hand-made frames with MIG doesn't necessarily mean it's not possible.
I touched on the conservatism angle a couple of times in this thread, the first time was 11 years ago. When they first started welding mountain bike frames, it was a big departure. There are many books and magazine articles written up until then about how you don't want to buy a welded bike because it's a sign of low quality and thick tubing. Lots of consumer "education" to overcome. Now people are used to perfectly uniform "stack of dimes" welds and I don't think mig ever looks that nice. So it would be a hard sell. But I mentioned recumbent makers that use MIG, they don't use it on the whole frame. There must be a reason for that. And the big factories don't mig together nice bikes either. If they felt comfortable that it would pass the required testing those bikes would be mig welded.

Somebody is out there brazing besides the bike industry or we wouldn't be able to buy filler.
unterhausen is offline  
Old 04-09-21, 09:53 AM
  #24  
unterhausen
Randomhead
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Happy Valley, Pennsylvania
Posts: 22,014
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 1,625 Times in 1,167 Posts
Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
The thread was bumped by a spammer, it's a zombie thread
Some of the people in this thread that made posts that might inflame others are no longer around to defend themselves so I'm going to close it.
unterhausen is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
bikebasket
Framebuilders
5
03-18-18 07:38 PM
calstar
Framebuilders
14
03-19-13 11:22 PM
roburrito
Framebuilders
9
05-13-12 05:21 AM
stryped
Framebuilders
23
07-12-11 05:01 PM
Nocturnus
Framebuilders
25
06-04-11 05:48 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.