Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Father’s Day mystery Stumpjumper. Info appreciated y’all

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Father’s Day mystery Stumpjumper. Info appreciated y’all

Old 06-21-20, 07:23 AM
  #1  
LBCwanabe 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 365
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 75 Post(s)
Liked 195 Times in 85 Posts
Father’s Day mystery Stumpjumper. Info appreciated y’all

It appears to have faded anodized bars? What year y’all suppose? The Seller was nice enough to hold for a week before I could make the 70 miles. He said he was the original owner and it was original throughout. Thanks for looking


LBCwanabe is offline  
Old 06-21-20, 07:48 AM
  #2  
Bianchi84
Senior Member
 
Bianchi84's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Concord, NC
Posts: 559

Bikes: 1984 Bianchi Tipo Corsa, 1985 Cannondale SM600 (24/26)

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 177 Post(s)
Liked 186 Times in 114 Posts
It's an interesting mix of components with Shimano cranks and rings but Suntour Derailleur. The under-stay U-brakes make for a stiff mounting area but might be mud-magnet. I wondering what those pedals are. The bike looks cool! Best of luck and lots of fun with it!
Bianchi84 is offline  
Old 06-21-20, 07:52 AM
  #3  
eeuuugh
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 127

Bikes: Aerotek 4000, Huffy Nel Lusso, Fuji Del Rey

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 56 Post(s)
Liked 44 Times in 22 Posts
It's a 1986. Awesome bike!
eeuuugh is offline  
Old 06-21-20, 07:54 AM
  #4  
stardognine
Senior Member
 
stardognine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Arid Arizona, for now.
Posts: 2,797

Bikes: 1995 Cannondale Killer V

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 732 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 308 Times in 225 Posts
I can’t quite read the RD, is that XC Sport? 🤔 Metal U-brakes are better than plastic, lol. 😁👍
stardognine is offline  
Old 06-21-20, 08:53 AM
  #5  
LBCwanabe 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 365
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 75 Post(s)
Liked 195 Times in 85 Posts
Originally Posted by eeuuugh View Post
It's a 1986. Awesome bike!
Frame appears to be tig welded w/o lugs. when I google 1986 model they are all lugged?

I've found a pic of a green 1987 that is outfitted with same components.

Last edited by LBCwanabe; 06-21-20 at 08:58 AM.
LBCwanabe is offline  
Old 06-21-20, 05:51 PM
  #6  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 25,129

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 136 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4791 Post(s)
Liked 2,344 Times in 1,386 Posts
Originally Posted by LBCwanabe View Post
Frame appears to be tig welded w/o lugs. when I google 1986 model they are all lugged?

I've found a pic of a green 1987 that is outfitted with same components.
I’d say 1988. Here’s one. 1986 to about 1990 is the “mistake” years for most mountain bikes. The “mistake” being the under the chainstays U-brake.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 06-21-20, 06:00 PM
  #7  
LBCwanabe 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 365
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 75 Post(s)
Liked 195 Times in 85 Posts
Originally Posted by Bianchi84 View Post
It's an interesting mix of components with Shimano cranks and rings but Suntour Derailleur. The under-stay U-brakes make for a stiff mounting area but might be mud-magnet. I wondering what those pedals are. The bike looks cool! Best of luck and lots of fun with it!
LBCwanabe is offline  
Old 06-21-20, 07:36 PM
  #8  
clubman 
Youngman Grand
 
clubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 8,060

Bikes: roadsters, club bikes, fixed and classic

Mentioned: 117 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2024 Post(s)
Liked 1,322 Times in 858 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
I’d say 1988. Here’s one. 1986 to about 1990 is the “mistake” years for most mountain bikes. The “mistake” being the under the chainstays U-brake.
Perhaps they weren't optimal but mistake is too harsh. I rode knee deep in TO's 4 season crud with the DX low mount U-brake for over 4 years . If you spray 'stuff' on them every so often, prise out the crud, change brake pads, clean your rims, they worked very well, better than most rear road calipers. Wide profile canti's at the front made sure you were stopping even better. Got my money out of them: the bike lives on today with a friend, still stopping fine..

That Stumpys great value at that price to me.

Last edited by clubman; 06-21-20 at 07:44 PM.
clubman is offline  
Likes For clubman:
Old 06-21-20, 08:40 PM
  #9  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 25,129

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 136 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4791 Post(s)
Liked 2,344 Times in 1,386 Posts
Originally Posted by clubman View Post
Perhaps they weren't optimal but mistake is too harsh. I rode knee deep in TO's 4 season crud with the DX low mount U-brake for over 4 years . If you spray 'stuff' on them every so often, prise out the crud, change brake pads, clean your rims, they worked very well, better than most rear road calipers. Wide profile canti's at the front made sure you were stopping even better. Got my money out of them: the bike lives on today with a friend, still stopping fine..

That Stumpys great value at that price to me.
Companies certainly thought they were a mistake. They dropped them like hot potatoes and even went back to cantilevers. Most brake systems can still be found on various quality bikes even now. Center pull calipers (Mafac style) are very rare but Paul still makes a version of them. Cantilevers are still available on a wide range of bikes. Disc brakes have replaced linear brakes but you can still find new bikes with v-brakes. The only place you’ll find u-brakes are on some freestyle BMX bikes. Nobody else wants to touch them.

From what I can see, the Stumpjumper only had them for that model year.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 06-21-20, 08:59 PM
  #10  
clubman 
Youngman Grand
 
clubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 8,060

Bikes: roadsters, club bikes, fixed and classic

Mentioned: 117 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2024 Post(s)
Liked 1,322 Times in 858 Posts
Just saying, they worked, even though they were pilloried. That fact that they didn't meet market expectations and got dumped doesn't diminish their intrinsic value.
I get the history lesson, I lived it and rode through it.
clubman is offline  
Old 06-21-20, 09:40 PM
  #11  
TenGrainBread 
Senior Member
 
TenGrainBread's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 2,589

Bikes: Cherubim, Alps, a few Schwinns

Mentioned: 52 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1072 Post(s)
Liked 409 Times in 258 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Companies certainly thought they were a mistake. They dropped them like hot potatoes and even went back to cantilevers. Most brake systems can still be found on various quality bikes even now. Center pull calipers (Mafac style) are very rare but Paul still makes a version of them. Cantilevers are still available on a wide range of bikes. Disc brakes have replaced linear brakes but you can still find new bikes with v-brakes. The only place you’ll find u-brakes are on some freestyle BMX bikes. Nobody else wants to touch them.
U-brakes work great. They are, after all, simply beefed up centerpull brakes, a design specced on millions of bikes over the last century. While centerpulls have lost popularity since the early 80s, it's not due to their braking performance but rather due to the ease of setup and marketability of sidepull brakes. In my opinion they are often more rigid than sidepulls and therefore offer slightly better braking performance. As to u-brakes, yes, the under-the-chainstay placement of mountain bike u-brakes in 1986-1988 was not the best idea, but the brakes themselves are great. Cantilever brakes offer more mud clearance and are a bit lighter, but generally do not offer better braking performance than u-brakes. In the vintage mountain bike world, some of the most sought-after bikes from the late 80s and early 90s are those with variations on u-brakes, by that time mostly mounted on the seatstays: Cunningham's lever-link brakes, WTB Speedmaster roller cams, and many other "boutique" brakes that boasted amazing performance compared to cantis, if you were willing to spend some time learning how to set them up. As far as BMX goes, u-brakes are the standard and there is quite a booming industry with hundreds of companies offering their own models.

By the way, centerpulls are still being made by a few more manufacturers than Paul. Rene Herse and Dia Compe both still manufacture them, for example. Dia Compe has at least 4 models under its own branding, plus they manufacture two separate models for a Japanese company called Grand Bois. Not to mention their full line of BMX u-brakes, starting with the cheaper cast Diatech "Magic" brakes up through their famous forged 990 model line from the late 80s, followed by their top-of-the-line "Box" U-brake which is fully CNC-machined.

Last edited by TenGrainBread; 06-22-20 at 08:40 AM.
TenGrainBread is offline  
Old 06-21-20, 10:05 PM
  #12  
mechanicmatt
Hoards Thumbshifters
 
mechanicmatt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Signal Mountain, TN
Posts: 1,137

Bikes: '87 Bruce Gordon Chinook, '08 Jamis Aurora, '86 Trek 560, '97 Mongoose Rockadile, & '91 Trek 750

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 222 Post(s)
Liked 293 Times in 176 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Companies certainly thought they were a mistake. They dropped them like hot potatoes and even went back to cantilevers. Most brake systems can still be found on various quality bikes even now. Center pull calipers (Mafac style) are very rare but Paul still makes a version of them. Cantilevers are still available on a wide range of bikes. Disc brakes have replaced linear brakes but you can still find new bikes with v-brakes. The only place you’ll find u-brakes are on some freestyle BMX bikes. Nobody else wants to touch them.

From what I can see, the Stumpjumper only had them for that model year.
I'm with you here, I rode plenty of bikes with them back in the day. They 'worked', they were not great and still are not great. Bad location and bad leverage.
mechanicmatt is offline  
Old 06-22-20, 08:31 AM
  #13  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 25,129

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 136 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4791 Post(s)
Liked 2,344 Times in 1,386 Posts
Originally Posted by clubman View Post
Just saying, they worked, even though they were pilloried. That fact that they didn't meet market expectations and got dumped doesn't diminish their intrinsic value.
I get the history lesson, I lived it and rode through it.
I choose not to ride through it. I broke a mountain bike frame in 1988 and refused to go the under the chainstay U-brake fashion of the day. I found a Bianchi Grizzly with cantilever brakes and rode it until the U-brake fad passed.

Originally Posted by TenGrainBread View Post
U-brakes work great. They are, after all, simply beefed up centerpull brakes, a design specced on millions of bikes over the last century. While centerpulls have lost popularity since the early 80s, it's not due to their braking performance but rather due to the ease of setup and marketability of sidepull brakes. In my opinion they are often more rigid than sidepulls and therefore offer slightly better braking performance. As to u-brakes, yes, the under-the-chainstay placement of mountain bike u-brakes in 1986-1988 was not the best idea, but the brakes themselves are great. Cantilever brakes offer more mud clearance and are a bit lighter, but generally do not offer better braking performance than u-brakes. In the vintage mountain bike world, some of the most sought-after bikes from the late 80s and early 90s are those with variations on u-brakes, by that time mostly mounted on the seatstays: Cunningham's level-link brakes, WTB Speedmaster roller cams, and many other "boutique" brakes that boasted amazing performance compared to cantis, if you were willing to spend some time learning how to set them up. As far as BMX goes, u-brakes are the standard and there is quite a booming industry with hundreds of companies offering their own models.
I wouldn’t consider the Cunningham nor the Speedmaster nor any other roller cam brake to be a “U-brake”. They are more like a modified linear brake than a U-brake. And, while they are mounted on the same bosses as U-brakes (whoever thought that was a good idea?), I don’t recall ever seeing them mounted under the chainstay in a place that collects mud.

The different boss mount location and different boss dimensions contributed to killing U-brakes as well. The brilliance of linear brakes is that they could be fitted on most any of the millions of bikes that existed before. And, as they are easier to set up than cantilever, many people embraced them. The brakes you referred to may be great brakes but they aren’t brakes that can be used on nearly all bikes. You have to have the right bike to use them.

By the way, centerpulls are still being made by a few more manufacturers than Paul. Rene Herse and Dia Compe both still manufacture them, for example. Dia Compe has at least 4 models under its own branding, plus they manufacture two separate models for a Japanese company called Grand Bois. Not to mention their full line of BMX u-brakes, starting with the cheaper cast Diatech "Magic" brakes up through their famous forged 990 model line from the late 80s, followed by their top-of-the-line "Box" U-brake which is fully CNC-machined.
I used Paul’s as an example, not an exhaustive list.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 06-22-20, 09:11 AM
  #14  
obrentharris 
Senior Member
 
obrentharris's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Point Reyes Station, California
Posts: 3,840

Bikes: Indeed!

Mentioned: 79 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1136 Post(s)
Liked 1,795 Times in 644 Posts
Nice Stumpjumper. I hope you have a lot of fun riding it!

I rode with a roller cam brake under the chainstays for 12 years. On our steep terrain I was willing to trade the better braking control and stopping power for the increased mud accumulation.
I rode in the mud all one winter, then had to ride in my own erosion gullies all the rest of the year. After that I stay off the trails when they are at their muddiest.



Brent
obrentharris is offline  
Old 06-22-20, 09:16 AM
  #15  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 19,282

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 168 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5411 Post(s)
Liked 2,210 Times in 1,432 Posts
The u brakes are definitely not great for riding off road but they're fine for gravel and trail riding. I have a late 80s Stumpjumper Comp with a u brake that I commute on regularly.

bikemig is offline  
Old 06-22-20, 11:08 AM
  #16  
fleslider 
Senior Member
 
fleslider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Fort Collins, CO
Posts: 1,496

Bikes: 1974 Paramount ~ 1974 Raleigh Pro ~ 1977 Pro-Tour ~ 1978 TX900 ~ IronMan 85,87:E/M,88:M/Pro,89:E ~ 98 Peugeot Festina Replica

Mentioned: 89 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 469 Post(s)
Liked 122 Times in 70 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
I wouldn’t consider the Cunningham nor the Speedmaster nor any other roller cam brake to be a “U-brake”. They are more like a modified linear brake than a U-brake. And, while they are mounted on the same bosses as U-brakes (whoever thought that was a good idea?), I don’t recall ever seeing them mounted under the chainstay in a place that collects mud.
Like alot of things in the industry there are things that didnt work out well or they found something that worked better in this case U-brakes , Yes they didnt work well well when things were muddy etc. but they were still effective. I always liked them as i was a young teenager when they came out. i remember drooling over the 1987 Diamond back Arrival in the LBS and wanting that Deore XT U-brake. but anyways yes they weren't the greatest and today I wouldnt volunteer to go on a muddy ride with them or any seroius kind of offroad riding with a U-Brake bike. now maybe my Karakoram with a seat stay mounted U-Brake. I dont think of them as a mistake just a revision of many made to the MTB's over the years! like the URT suspension ,the wide rims.

just for the record here are two bikes i own that have under chainstay Roller Cam brakes


1986 Fisher

Kind of hard to see but theres a roller cam behind that Shimano 600 triple cranks

1986 Trek 850
__________________
fleslider is offline  
Old 06-22-20, 04:37 PM
  #17  
cs1
Senior Member
 
cs1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Clev Oh
Posts: 7,077

Bikes: Specialized, Schwinn

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 211 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 13 Posts
Originally Posted by eeuuugh View Post
It's a 1986. Awesome bike!
I was thinking 86 or 87.
cs1 is offline  
Old 06-22-20, 05:23 PM
  #18  
madpogue 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Madison, WI USA
Posts: 5,657
Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1861 Post(s)
Liked 950 Times in 714 Posts
Markings are a close match to my '87 RockHopper. Serial number should narrow it down.
madpogue is offline  
Old 07-06-20, 06:33 PM
  #19  
LBCwanabe 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 365
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 75 Post(s)
Liked 195 Times in 85 Posts
Update:
the rear gx26 wheel had busted spoke holes at the hub. Lucky for me I had a spare While waiting for the front brake cable hanger to ship I disabled the front brakes and took it for a spin. I also added some bosco bullmoose bars, Shimano levers and thumbies. In this configuration the closest thing I can compare it to is a wheelbarrow. I mean this in the most sincere flattering way.





LBCwanabe is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.