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Will my new bike take my weight or should I return it ?

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Will my new bike take my weight or should I return it ?

Old 12-17-21, 05:48 AM
  #1  
dgrhddan
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Will my new bike take my weight or should I return it ?

hi guys and girls
My partner bought me a bike as a gift and im worried my weight will break or effect the bikes parts, the main reason i wanted a bike was to loose weight
i contacted the shop and they said the bike should be able to hold up to 20 stone and i am 23 stone so the question is should i return the bike and look for another one? the specs of the bike are below

Frame: 6061 heat treated aluminium
Fork: 63mm travel SR Suntour SF20-NEX -RS 700C w/preload adjuster
Front Derailleur: Shimano FD-TX800-TS6
Rear Derailleur: Shimano RD-TX800
Shifters: Shimano Altus SL-M315
Speed: 24
Crankset: 48T/38T/28T alloy crankset w/ 73-122mm bottom bracket
Cassette: 11-32T 8 speed cassette
Chain: KMC Z-8.3 8 speed chain
Brakes: Clarks Cloud hydraulic disc brakes
Tyres: WTB Nano Comp 700x40C
Pedals: Included

thanks for any advice in Advance
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Old 12-17-21, 06:04 AM
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shelbyfv
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Being a gift, I'd say ride it and fix stuff if/when it breaks. Your partner put some thought into it so be appreciative and enthusiastic even if it's not exactly what you would have preferred. At 322lbs you are unlikely to break anything other than the rear wheel. FWIW, cycling is fun but not a good way to lose weight. Walking is better for that.
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Old 12-17-21, 06:18 AM
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livedarklions
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I have some experience with this, having bought a bike for a 350 pound person in the last couple years.

Those weight limits are stated for liability purposes. I think if there's going to be any part failures it will likely be repairable issues with the wheels not staying true. The 40c tires were a good idea on that count.
Also, the hydraulic brakes are good, braking is harder with weight.

No question that your weight will wear the bike faster, but that's what the bike is for. It takes the stress of your weight so you can be more mobile and active. If you're comfortable on the bike and it's an enjoyable (or at least tolerable) workout, wearing the bike out is probably worth it. When you lose the weight, you may very well want something different anyway.

I lost about 150 pounds a few years ago, and I rode a bit when I was at 320 pounds. I didn't find it easy, so my first suggestion is to be very patient with yourself, it's better to be slow and do it regularly than to push yourself into something you can't sustain and walk away from in frustration. It really does get easier as the pounds come off, but in my experience, that's gradual.

I don't think a catastrophic failure of the bike is likely at all, if that's what you're worried about.
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Old 12-17-21, 06:21 AM
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
Being a gift, I'd say ride it and fix stuff if/when it breaks. Your partner put some thought into it so be appreciative and enthusiastic even if it's not exactly what you would have preferred. At 322lbs you are unlikely to break anything other than the rear wheel. FWIW, cycling is fun but not a good way to lose weight. Walking is better for that.

Having been that weight at one point in my life, walking at that weight for any significant distance can be a nightmare. Cycling is good in that it doesn't stress the joints and feet.
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Old 12-17-21, 06:37 AM
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Congratulations on having a partner who cares about your health and gave you a very nice gift!

I too have lost substantial weight (90 lbs) over the years and for me, cycling has been my main form of exercise. I did have to replace a rear wheel, and if you do so, come back here for advice.

You may want to check out the "Clydesdales" section of this site as well.
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Old 12-17-21, 06:51 AM
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Your biggest issue is going to be wheels, especially rear. You may want to ride the bike a bit and then have the shop true and tension the wheels. The key to it is having the spokes properly tensioned.
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Old 12-17-21, 06:54 AM
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Sounds like a reasonable spec'd hybrid. You should be fine with it, just make sure the tyres are pumped up to the higher quoted figure and don't do anything too rough with it (jumping up and down curbs etc).
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Old 12-17-21, 10:47 AM
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None of that parts list is of any use for weight limits. Tell us exactly what bike it is and how many spokes.
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Old 12-17-21, 12:09 PM
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Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
Your biggest issue is going to be wheels, especially rear. You may want to ride the bike a bit and then have the shop true and tension the wheels. The key to it is having the spokes properly tensioned.
This, plus having enough spokes on the wheels. But wheels aren't that expensive compared to the rest of the bike, and those 40 tires should soak up most of the bumps that could crack something like the frame.

Last edited by LAJ; 12-18-21 at 12:45 PM. Reason: Clean Up
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Old 12-17-21, 12:19 PM
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OP, enjoy the bike. As others have stated, getting the spokes properly tensioned will help. When I bought my Surly Long Haul Trucker, I had the spokes de-tensioned, the re-tensioned properly. I had it done before I picked it up. Machine built wheels are not always tensioned properly. I have had that bike on multiple fully loaded tours, and a many miles of commuting, and loaded errand riding since 2011, and the wheels are still true.

Ride the bike and enjoy. Cheers

Last edited by LAJ; 12-18-21 at 12:46 PM. Reason: Clean Up
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Old 12-17-21, 12:22 PM
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Go with 36 Spokes and have them Checked.
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Old 12-17-21, 01:43 PM
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You'll be fine. The bike will be fine. Just don't go out and run a BMX race with it or pretend you are in those x-games doing flips and styling for the cameras.
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Old 12-17-21, 02:09 PM
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It will be fine. You may experience medium/long term durability issues with the wheels, esp. the rear wheel - bearings may get rough and spokes may start to break. Luckily, neither of these issues are critical safety failures, and you can generally ride home to safety after they happen. Save your pennies and get a more robust wheel built when/if the original one starts to fail.

Otherwise, make sure the tires are pumped up appropriately - 40 mm wide tires don't need a whole lot of pressure, even for heavier riders, but make sure you aren't pinching the tire against the rim when you hit bumps - and ride the bike.
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Old 12-17-21, 03:27 PM
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23 stone, huh? I had to google that. Now if you had said you weigh 5438 stick, I would have known exactly what that means.***


All seriousness- I would ride the bike. Wheels may suffer depending on how you ride(lift off the saddle when you hit curbs, bumps, etc), but I wouldnt think twice about riding the bike. Enjoy the hobby!
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Old 12-17-21, 03:28 PM
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With the proper diet you would be surprised at what bike riding can do for weight loss. Great advice on what to do as far as the bike and comfort. Don't get frustrated. When I start in again after a winter layoff or an accident like last year I am tempted to go all out and I ALWAYS suffer for it. Take you rime and listen to your body.

Ride, explore, have fun. A bike should be fun.
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Old 12-17-21, 03:41 PM
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Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
fify

6061 aluminum has a resistance to failure of 45,000 psi. If something's going to fail on the bike, it's almost certainly not the frame.
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Old 12-17-21, 03:47 PM
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
23 stone, huh? I had to google that. Now if you had said you weigh 5438 stick, I would have known exactly what that means.***


All seriousness- I would ride the bike. Wheels may suffer depending on how you ride(lift off the saddle when you hit curbs, bumps, etc), but I wouldnt think twice about riding the bike. Enjoy the hobby!

How many stones in a fortnight?

That's generally good advice for everyone on the bumps and curbs, but I remember having a few spoke mishaps when I was heavy. It really was no big deal and think this is really good advice.
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Old 12-17-21, 03:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Rdmonster69 View Post
With the proper diet you would be surprised at what bike riding can do for weight loss. Great advice on what to do as far as the bike and comfort. Don't get frustrated. When I start in again after a winter layoff or an accident like last year I am tempted to go all out and I ALWAYS suffer for it. Take you rime and listen to your body.

Ride, explore, have fun. A bike should be fun.

For me, one of the best things about biking is you can give yourself a little more motivation by setting a reasonably distant destination to stop at, like a coffee place or whatever. I find I do a lot more riding that way than if I just ride a loop or something repetitive.
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Old 12-17-21, 04:02 PM
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Congrats on your new bike. Merry Christmas!

Rear wheels on inexpensive bikes are notorious. There are fortunately a lot of options to upgrade when it becomes a problem.

You are going to bottom out that suspension fork, probably. If you have a preload knob dial it in all the way. I'll look up later if there is a harder spring to buy - there might not be or it might be hard to find for sale but worth a look.

Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
23 stone, huh? I had to google that. Now if you had said you weigh 5438 stick, I would have known exactly what that means.***
I work in a business where we most often use US customary units for one big thing but if you buy the much smaller thing it comes in grams. That's frustrating but I'm thankful it does not come in grains or drams or pennyweights or troy ounces all of which are US customary units in current use somewhere.
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Old 12-17-21, 04:39 PM
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Let me briefly cover how structures (such as bike frames and bikes) are specified, designed, and built.

First, no product manager who knows his business is going to specify a weight limit that's what the lawyer is going to label a product. He (or she) will throw some margin on the design specification above what the product will be labeled. Second, no engineer worth his salt is going to design a frame that's specified at (for instance) 280 pounds, or 20 stone, to hold only 280 pounds before it breaks. The engineer is going to add design margin, and probably a factor of safety. So the frame that started out to carry a 280 pound perhaps will have a 25% margin and design spec of 350 pounds going to the engineer, who'll add a 30% margin and a 50% safety factor, so the design going to the manufacturer should hold 680 pounds before it breaks. The manufacturer will need to test one or more frames to failure to qualify his build material and process, so he'll add a factor of safety of 10%. Now the frame should not fail with a load of less than 750 pounds.

Now of course shock loads will be higher than static loads. Stuff like 1/2" cracks or 1" deep potholes should mostly be soaked up by those 40 mm wide tires. Now the product manager may think the bike will be ridden over 4" rocks; the liability insurance company will make sure that's accounted for, so the design spec may be 450 pounds going to the engineer, and the qualification should hold up to a 960 pound static test load. Riding off ledges? People will do stupid stuff that breaks frames; don't do that.

Can a 320 pound rider safely ride a bike spec'ed at 280 pounds? If he's smart, it very unlikely to be a problem. Don't ride off curbs, down stairs, or jump off handrails. Will the frame break? If you ride it long and hard enough, it might. Take off 100 pounds over the next couple years, and it's more likely you'll back over it with a car than ride it until it breaks. Or it might last until the heat death of the sun.

Please note these numbers are all for illustration, and should not be taken as engineering guidance. Professional guidance costs extra.

Last edited by LAJ; 12-18-21 at 12:44 PM. Reason: Clean Up
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Old 12-18-21, 07:25 AM
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Lots of good, and mostly supportive, advice in this thread. Hope the OP takes advantage of it.
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Old 12-18-21, 07:40 AM
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While the rear wheel will break faster, it shouldn't be catastrophic/dangerous.
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Old 12-18-21, 07:49 AM
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
Being a gift, I'd say ride it and fix stuff if/when it breaks. Your partner put some thought into it so be appreciative and enthusiastic even if it's not exactly what you would have preferred. At 322lbs you are unlikely to break anything other than the rear wheel. FWIW, cycling is fun but not a good way to lose weight. Walking is better for that.
I lost over 175 lbs using cycling as my activity of choice along with a better diet. Running, or just plain walking was hard on my knees, back, and ankles. Cycling on the other hand, was not. They only thing I did was have the rear wheel trued on my initial bike and then eventually got a better made wheelset.
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Old 12-18-21, 07:59 AM
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Originally Posted by dgrhddan View Post
hi guys and girls
My partner bought me a bike as a gift and im worried my weight will break or effect the bikes parts, the main reason i wanted a bike was to loose weight
i contacted the shop and they said the bike should be able to hold up to 20 stone and i am 23 stone so the question is should i return the bike and look for another one? the specs of the bike are below

Frame: 6061 heat treated aluminium
Fork: 63mm travel SR Suntour SF20-NEX -RS 700C w/preload adjuster
Front Derailleur: Shimano FD-TX800-TS6
Rear Derailleur: Shimano RD-TX800
Shifters: Shimano Altus SL-M315
Speed: 24
Crankset: 48T/38T/28T alloy crankset w/ 73-122mm bottom bracket
Cassette: 11-32T 8 speed cassette
Chain: KMC Z-8.3 8 speed chain
Brakes: Clarks Cloud hydraulic disc brakes
Tyres: WTB Nano Comp 700x40C
Pedals: Included

thanks for any advice in Advance
Should be fine, as someone that started out at 375 lbs, I rode a Trek 7300 and the wheels held up fine, but I did have to get them trued often and I did break a spoke or two, but not a huge ordeal. I ended up getting a stronger wheelset made down the road, but I ended up losing over 175 riding my bike. Congrats and good luck. Check out the Clydesdale forum, lots a great info there for the larger rider.

This was the original bike I started riding on, but after I rebuilt it and converted to a commuter. After I had about 4000 miles on it, I had these wheels built and put another 8000 miles on this bike until I sold it to a kid that needed some transportation.

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Old 12-18-21, 08:15 AM
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I agree with what most people have already said in here about the weight rating. You should be fine as long as your bike is assembled well, and the wheels are tuned nicely. Even then, I have seen a great many morbidly obese people riding cheapo Huffy beach cruisers and those bikes seem to be doing just fine. Just take a week of vacation to St. Augustine and see for yourself. I'd wager those bikes were ridden as soon as the got home, without much thought to proper assembly and wheel-tuning. Now add the much-higher quality of your new bike, you'll probably be just fine if you dont beat the hell out of it. I also want to disagree with those that say that cycling is a poor way to lose weight. I'll agree with that but only if I can add that its a great way to get your body back into motion. Motion is lotion, and if you move move move, you'll start to groove groove groove. Getting back on a bike is a good way to get your ass off the chair. Its all got to start somewhere, and getting on a bike is a great way to start your recovery to a thinner you, and better health. Couple that with some intermittent fasting, and light keto diet, and the weight will melt off.
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